Scouting/BSA/Metalwork Merit Badge

From Wikibooks, open books for an open world
< Scouting‎ | BSA
Jump to: navigation, search
The requirements to this merit badge are copyrighted by the Boy Scouts of America. They are reproduced in part here under fair use as a resource for Scouts and Scouters to use in the earning and teaching of merit badges. The requirements published by the Boy Scouts of America should always be used over the list here. If in doubt about the accuracy of a requirement, consult your Merit Badge Counselor.
Reading this page does not satisfy any requirement for any merit badge. Per National regulations, the only person who may sign off on requirements is a Merit Badge Counselor, duly registered and authorized by the local Council. To obtain a list of registered Merit Badge Counselors, or to begin a Merit Badge, please contact your Scoutmaster or Council Service Center.
Blacksmith at work02.jpg

Requirement 1[edit]

Read the safety rules for metalwork. Discuss how to be safe while working with metal. Discuss with your counselor the additional safety rules that apply to the metalwork option you choose for requirement 5.

SHEET METAL SAFETY
Paying attention to what you are doing and wearing the proper gear is critical in metalworking. When sheet metal is cut, a small chip of metal may fly anywhere -- possibly into your eye. Sharp edges on metal can cause cuts. Hot metal can cause painful burns. The rules listed below apply to all four metalworking options.
  1. Always work with direct adult supervision.
  2. Always wear safety goggles or safety glasses, leather gloves, and a shop apron.
  3. Handle sheet metal with care. It can cause serious cuts.
  4. Treat every cut immediately, no matter how minor.
  5. Remove all burrs from the sheet metal before attempting further work on it.
  6. Use a brush--not your hands-to clean the work area.
  7. Do not run your hands over the surface of sheet metal that has just been cut or drilled. The burrs can cut.
  8. Place scrap pieces of sheet metal in a scrap box right away.
  9. Do not use tools that are not in first-class condition. Avoid hammers with loose handles or chisels with worn or misshapen heads.
  10. Use a broom and dustpan to sweep the shop floor. Do not leave slivers of metal on the worktable or the shop floor.
SAFETY WITH THE PICKLING TANK
If you select the silversmith option to complete your Metalwork merit badge, you have additional safety rules to learn. Follow these guidelines when using the pickling tank, and integral step in the silversmithing process.
  1. Always use the pickling tank with adult supervision.
  2. Always wear eye protection, a shop apron, and rubber gloves when working with the pickling tank and solution.
  3. Use the pickling tank in a well-ventilated space, and do not breathe fumes from the pickling solutions.
  4. Never pour water into the pickling tank solution; pour the pickling solution into the water.
  5. Keep small children and pets away from the pickling tank.
  6. Always store the pickling tank with its lid tightly secured.
  7. Plainly mark the contents of the pickling tank.
SAFETY WITH MOLTEN PEWTER
If you select the founder option to complete your Metalworking merit badge, you will be working with molten pewter. You must know a few more safety rules:
  1. Always work with direct adult supervision.
  2. Have at least one fire extinguisher handy when using the melting pot.
  3. Place a sheet of metal under the metal pot and the mold-pouring area to prevent accidental splatters from burning your worktable.
  4. Wear safety glasses, leather gloves, long pants, boots, and a shop apron when pouring metal. Be sure to pull your pant legs down over the top of your boots. Do not wear shorts, sandals, or water shoes.
  5. Do not set a pouring ladle down with its handle extending past the edge of the workbench.
  6. Do not put moist or wet metal in the melting pot. Bubbles caused by escaping steam will cause the molten metal to splash out the crucible, possibly causing painful burns.
  7. Do not eat while casting metal.
  8. Always wash your hands after handling metal.
SAFETY WITH HOT STEEL
If you choose the blacksmith option to complete your Metalwork merit badge, you will be working with orange- or yellow-hot steel. Here are some special rules you must follow:
  1. Always work with direct adult supervision.
  2. Have at least one fire extinguisher handy at all times.
  3. Wear safety glasses, leather gloves, a shop apron, long pants, and boots when working in a blacksmith shop. Be sure to pull your pant legs down over the tops of your boots. Do not wear shorts, sandals, or water shoes.
  4. Put hot metal in an out-of-the-way place to cool.
  5. Use tongs to pick up a dropped object. Although it might not glow, it may still be 1000 degrees.

Requirement 2[edit]

Define the terms native metal, malleable, metallurgy, alloy, nonferrous, and ferrous. Then do the following:

A. Name two nonferrous alloys used by pre-Iron Age metalworkers. Name the metals that are combined to form these alloys.
B. Name three ferrous alloys used by modern metalworkers.
C. Describe how to work-harden a metal.
D. Describe how to anneal a nonferrous and a ferrous metal.

Requirement 3[edit]

Do the following:

A. Work-harden a piece of 26- or 28-gauge sheet brass or sheet copper. Put a 45-degree bend in the metal, then heavily peen the area along the bend line to work-harden it. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point in this unworked piece of metal.
B. Soften the work-hardened piece from requirement 3a by annealing it, and then try to remove the 45-degree bend. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point.
C. Make a temper color index from a flat piece of steel. Using hand tools, make and temper a center punch of medium-carbon or high-carbon steel.

Requirement 4[edit]

Find out about three career opportunities in metalworking. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

Requirement 5[edit]

After completing the first four requirements, complete at least ONE of the options listed below.

A. Option 1 – Sheet Metal Mechanic/Tinsmith[edit]

1. Name and describe the use of the basic sheet metalworking tools.
2. Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet metal. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
3. Make two objects out of 24- or 26-gauge sheet metal. Use patterns either provided by your counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. Construct these objects using a metal that is appropriate to the object's ultimate purpose, and using cutting, bending, edging, and either soldering or brazing.
a. One object also must include at least one riveted component
b. If you do not make your objects from zinc-plated sheet steel or tin-plated sheet steel, preserve your work from oxidation.

B. Option 2 – Silversmith[edit]

1. Name and describe the use of a silversmith's basic tools.
2. Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet silver. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
3. Make two objects out of 18- or 20-gauge sheet copper. Use patterns either provided by your counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. Both objects must include a soldered joint. If you have prior silversmithing experience, you may substitute sterling silver, nickel silver, or lead-free pewter.
a. At least one object must include a sawed component you have made yourself.
b. At least one object must include a sunken part you have made yourself.
c. Clean and polish your objects.

C. Option 3 – Founder[edit]

1. Name and describe the use of the basic parts of a two-piece mold. Name at least three different types of molds.
2. Create a sketch of two objects to cast in metal. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
3. Make two molds, one using a pattern provided by your counselor and another one you have made yourself that has been approved by your counselor. Position the pouring gate and vents yourself. Do not use copyrighted materials as patterns.
a. Using lead-free pewter, make a casting using a mold provided by your counselor.
b. Using lead-free pewter, make a casting using the mold that you have made.

D. Option 4 – Blacksmith[edit]

1. Name and describe the use of a blacksmith's basic tools.
2. Make a sketch of two objects to hot-forge. Include each component’s dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
3. Using low–carbon steel at least 1/4-inch thick, perform the following exercises:
a. Draw out by forging a taper.
b. Use the horn of the anvil by forging a U-shaped bend.
c. Form a decorative twist in a piece of square steel.
d. Use the edge of the anvil to bend metal by forging an L-shaped bend.
4. Using low-carbon steel at least 1/4-inch thick, make the two objects you sketched that require hot-forging. Be sure you have your counselor's approval before you begin.
a. Include a decorative twist on one object.
b. Include a hammer-riveted joint in one object.
c. Preserve your work from oxidation.


External links[edit]

Earning Merit Badges in the Boy Scouts of America
Professions and Trades
Animal Science | Architecture | Automotive Maintenance | Dentistry | Drafting | Electronics | Engineering | Farm Mechanics | Game Design | Graphic Arts | Home Repairs | Journalism | Landscape Architecture | Law | Medicine | Metalwork | Plumbing | Programming | Public Health | Pulp and Paper | Salesmanship | Surveying | Textile | Truck Transportation | Veterinary Medicine | Woodwork
Earning Merit Badges in the Boy Scouts of America
American Business | American Cultures | American Heritage | American Labor | Animal Science | Animation | Archaeology | Archery | Architecture | Art | Astronomy | Athletics | Automotive Maintenance | Aviation | Backpacking | Basketry | Bird Study | Bugling | Camping | Canoeing | Chemistry | Chess | Citizenship in the Community | Citizenship in the Nation | Citizenship in the World | Climbing | Coin Collecting | Collections | Communications | Composite Materials | Cooking | Crime Prevention | Cycling | Dentistry | Digital Technology | Disabilities Awareness | Dog Care | Drafting | Electricity | Electronics | Emergency Preparedness | Energy | Engineering | Entrepreneurship | Environmental Science | Family Life | Farm Mechanics | Fingerprinting | Fire Safety | First Aid | Fish and Wildlife Management | Fishing | Fly Fishing | Forestry | Game Design | Gardening | Genealogy | Geocaching | Geology | Golf | Graphic Arts | Hiking | Home Repairs | Horsemanship | Indian Lore | Insect Study | Inventing | Journalism | Kayaking | Landscape Architecture | Law | Leatherwork | Lifesaving | Mammal Study | Medicine | Metalwork | Mining in Society | Model Design and Building | Motorboating | Moviemaking | Music | Nature | Nuclear Science | Oceanography | Orienteering | Painting | Personal Fitness | Personal Management | Pets | Photography | Pioneering | Plant Science | Plumbing | Pottery | Programming | Public Health | Public Speaking | Pulp and Paper | Radio | Railroading | Reading | Reptile and Amphibian Study | Rifle Shooting | Rowing | Safety | Salesmanship | Scholarship | Scouting Heritage | Scuba Diving | Sculpture | Search & Rescue | Shotgun Shooting | Signs, Signals & Codes | Skating | Small-Boat Sailing | Snow Sports | Soil and Water Conservation | Space Exploration | Sports | Stamp Collecting | Surveying | Sustainability | Swimming | Textile | Theater | Traffic Safety | Truck Transportation | Veterinary Medicine | Water Sports | Weather | Welding | Whitewater | Wilderness Survival | Wood Carving | Woodwork