Scouting/BSA/Archery Merit Badge

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The requirements to this merit badge are copyrighted by the Boy Scouts of America. They are reproduced in part here under fair use as a resource for Scouts and Scouters to use in the earning and teaching of merit badges. The requirements published by the Boy Scouts of America should always be used over the list here. If in doubt about the accuracy of a requirement, consult your Merit Badge Counselor.
Reading this page does not satisfy any requirement for any merit badge. Per National regulations, the only person who may sign off on requirements is a Merit Badge Counselor, duly registered and authorized by the local Council. To obtain a list of registered Merit Badge Counselors, or to begin a Merit Badge, please contact your Scoutmaster or Council Service Center.
Archery competition.jpg

Requirement 1[edit]

Do the following:

A. State and explain the Range Safety Rules.
1. Three safety rules when on the shooting line.
2. Three safety rules when retrieving arrows.
3. The four whistle commands used on a range and their related verbal commands.
B. State and explain the general safety rules for archery. Demonstrate how to safely carry arrows in your hands.
C. Tell about your local and state lfws for owning and using archery tackle.

Requirement 2[edit]

Do the following:

A. Name and point out the parts of an arrow.
There are five simple parts to the arrow. The Shaft, Knock, Fletching, Index Fletching, and Tip.
B. Describe three or more different types of arrows.
Carbon arrows are light but less stiff. Aluminum arrows are slightly heavier than carbon arrows but they are stiffer and break less easily. Wooden arrows are traditional but they break too easily to use in higher power recurve bows or compound bows.
C. Name the four principle materials for making arrow shafts.
The four materials are Wood, Carbon Fiber, Fiberglass, and Aluminum.
D. Do the following:
1. Make a complete arrow from a bare shaft using appropriate equipment available to you.
OR
2. To demonstrate arrow repair, inspect the shafts and prepare and replace at least three vanes, one point, and one nock. You may use as many arrows as necessary to accomplish this. The repairs can be done on wood, fiberglass, or aluminum arrows.
E. Explain how to properly care for and store arrows.

Requirement 3[edit]

Do the following:

A. Explain the proper use, care, and storage of, as well as the reasons for using tabs, arm guards, shooting gloves, and quivers.
B. Explain the following terms: cast, draw weight, string height (fistmele), aiming, spine, mechanical release, freestyle, and barebow.
C. Make a bowstring using appropriate materials.

Requirement 4[edit]

Explain the following:

A. The importance of obedience to a range officer or other person in charge of a range.
B. The difference between an end and a round.
An end is the number of arrows you will shoot from your quiver.  A round is the number of ends you will shoot.
C. The differences among field, target, and 3-D archery.
D. How the five-color Federation Internationale de Tir a l'Arc (FITA) target is scored.
E. How the National Field Archery Association (NFAA) black-and-white field targets and blue indoor targets are scored.
F. The elimination system used in Olympic archery competition.

Requirement 5[edit]

Do ONE of the following options:

Option A - Using a Recurve Bow or Longbow[edit]

A. Name and Point to the parts of the recurve bow or longbow you are shooting.
B. Explain how to properly care for and store recurve bows and longbows.
C. Show the ten steps of good shooting for the bow you are shooting.
D. Demonstrate the proper way to string a recurve bow or longbow.
E. Using a bow square, locate and mark with dental floss, crimp-on, or other method, the nocking point on the bowstring of the bow you are using.
F. Do ONE of the following:
1. Using a recurve bow or longbow and arrows with a finger release, shoot a single round of one of the following BSA, USA Archery, or NFAA rounds:
a. An NFAA field round of 14 targets and make a score of 60 points.
b. A BSA Scout field round of 14 targets and make a score of 80 points.
c. A Junior 900 round and make a score of 180 points.
d. An FITA/USA Archery indoor round I and make a score of 80 points.
e. An NFAA indoor round and make a score of 50 points.
(The indoor rounds may be shot outdoors if this is more convenient.)
OR
2. Shooting 30 arrows in five-arrow ends at an 80-centimeter (32-inch) five-color target at 10 yards and using the 10 scoring regions, make a score of 150.
OR
3. As a member of the NAA’s Junior Olympic Archery Development program (JOAD), achieve the level of green, purple, and gray stars as part of a JOAD Club indoor or outdoor season with your chosen style of archery equipment
OR
4. As a member of the NFAA's Junior Division, earn a Cub or Youth 100-score Progression patch.

Option B - Using a Compound Bow[edit]

A. Name and point to the parts of the compound bow you are shooting.
B. Explain how to properly care for and store compound bows.
C. Show the ten steps of good shooting for the compound bow you are shooting.
D. Explain why it is necessary to have the string or cable on a compound bow replaced at an archery shop.
E. Locate and mark with dental floss, crimp-on, or other method, the nocking point on the bowstring of the bow you are using.
F. Do ONE of the following:
1. Using a compound bow and arrows with a finger release, shoot a single round of ONE of the following BSA, NAA,or NFAA rounds:
a. An NFAA field round of 4 targets and make a score of 70 points.
b. A BSA Scout field round of 14 targets and make a score of 90 points.
c. A Junior 900 round and make a score of 200 points.
d. An FITA/USA Archery indoor round I and make a score of 90 points.
e. An NFAA indoor round and make a score of 60 points.
(The indoor rounds may be shot outdoors if this is more convenient.)
OR
2. Shooting at an 80-centimeter (32-inch) five-color target at 15 yards and using the 10 scoring regions, make a minimum score of 160. Accomplish this in the following manner:
Shoot 15 arrows in five-arrow ends, at a distance of 10 yards
AND
Shoot 15 arrows in five-arrow ends, at a distance of 15 yards.
OR
3. As a member of the NAA’s Junior Olympic Archery Development program (JOAD), achieve the level of green, purple, and gray stars as part of a JOAD Club indoor or outdoor season with your chosen style of archery equipment
OR
4. As a member of the NFAA's Junior Division, earn a Cub or Youth 100-score Progression patch.


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