Cookbook:Dehydrated Broth

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Dehydrated broth, also called bouillon from the French term for broth, is stock or broth that has been concentrated and/or dehydrated. This increases the shelf life and reduces its storage footprint, making it a convenient alternative to fresh broth. It can be reconstituted in water to make liquid broth or used as a dry seasoning. Broth made from rehydrated cubes tastes different from fresh broth due to its higher salt content and the flavor change from the extended boiling process.

Composition[edit | edit source]

Dehydrated bouillon is typically made by dehydrating vegetables, stock, a small portion of solid fat, salt, and various seasonings. Depending on the brand, country, and specific flavor, they may also contain ingredients such as hydrolyzed vegetable protein, yeast extract, monosodium glutamate, cassava, and mushrooms.

Types[edit | edit source]

Bouillon is typically available as a cube, powder, or paste. A bouillon cube (US) or stock cube (UK and Australia) is formed into a small cube about 15 mm wide. Bouillon powder is similar, but it is easier to sprinkle and dissolves faster. Bouillon paste contains a small amount of water and may require refrigeration. Common brands include Oxo, Knorr, Rose Hill, Jumbo brand (Gallina Blanca), Maggi, Hormel's Herb-Ox, Wyler's, Goya, and Kallo.

Uses[edit | edit source]

Dehydrated broth is used in a variety of cuisines worldwide. Maggi brand bouillon cubes are widely-used in West African cuisine.

Gallery[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]