Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...e5/2. Nf3/2...Nc6/3. Bb5/3...f5/4. Nc3/4...fxe4/5. Nxe4/5...d5/6. Nxe5/6...dxe4/7. Nxc6/7...Qg5/8. Qe2/8...Nf6/9. Nxa7

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< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. e4‎ | 1...e5‎ | 2. Nf3‎ | 2...Nc6‎ | 3. Bb5‎ | 3...f5‎ | 4. Nc3‎ | 4...fxe4‎ | 5. Nxe4‎ | 5...d5‎ | 6. Nxe5‎ | 6...dxe4‎ | 7. Nxc6‎ | 7...Qg5‎ | 8. Qe2‎ | 8...Nf6
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Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defence
a b c d e f g h
8{{{square}}} black rook{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black bishop{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black bishop{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black rook8
7{{{square}}} white knight{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn7
6{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black knight{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king6
5{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white bishop{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black queen{{{square}}} black king5
4{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king4
3{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king3
2{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white queen{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn2
1{{{square}}} white rook{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white bishop{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white rook1
a b c d e f g h

9...Bd7 is the main line. Black preserves castling rights and denies the a7-knight the chance of exchanging itself on c8, which would be the coward's way out. It looks as though the move overworks the f6-knight, but in fact there are tactical reasons why grabbing the e4-pawn doesn't lead to any advantage.

9...Kd8 invites 10.Nxc8 and it looks like White has no problems, but Black has a glimmer of hope based on the fact that g2 is still hanging. German correspondence player Peter Leisebein is the main champion of this line.

9...c6? 10.Nxc6! means the c8-bishop will have to go to d7 anyway, but with one fewer Black pawn on the board.