Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...e5/2. Nf3/2...Nc6/3. Bb5/3...f5/4. Nc3/4...fxe4/5. Nxe4/5...d5/6. Nxe5/6...dxe4/7. Nxc6/7...Qd5/8. c4/8...Qd6

From Wikibooks, open books for an open world
< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. e4‎ | 1...e5‎ | 2. Nf3‎ | 2...Nc6‎ | 3. Bb5‎ | 3...f5‎ | 4. Nc3‎ | 4...fxe4‎ | 5. Nxe4‎ | 5...d5‎ | 6. Nxe5‎ | 6...dxe4‎ | 7. Nxc6‎ | 7...Qd5‎ | 8. c4
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Ruy Lopez, Schliemann Defence
a b c d e f g h
8{{{square}}} black rook{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black bishop{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black bishop{{{square}}} black knight{{{square}}} black rook8
7{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn7
6{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white knight{{{square}}} black queen{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king6
5{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white bishop{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king5
4{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king4
3{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king3
2{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn2
1{{{square}}} white rook{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white bishop{{{square}}} white queen{{{square}}} white king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white rook1
a b c d e f g h

9. Nxa7+ was first played in Gligoric-Heidenfeld 1960. It's not entirely clear how Black is going to punish White for simply grabbing a second pawn and holding on to it - on the contrary, White still has the threat of Qh5+ on the board, so it may be Black that gets the punishment.

9. Qh5+ was played against Günther Möhring, the originator of the 7...Qd5 variation, in two Hungarian tournaments in the 1980s. As is usually the case for loud forcing moves, it's actually a little more drawish than the alternative. Black will probably come out of the looming queen trade with castling rights still intact, which isn't the case in the 9. Nxa7+ line.