Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...c6/2. d4/2...d5/3. e5/3...Bf5/4. Bd3/4...Bxd3/5. Qxd3/5...e6

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< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. e4‎ | 1...c6‎ | 2. d4‎ | 2...d5‎ | 3. e5‎ | 3...Bf5‎ | 4. Bd3‎ | 4...Bxd3‎ | 5. Qxd3
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Caro-Kann Defence - Advance Variation
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation (FEN)

rn1qkbnr/pp3ppp/2p1p3/3pP3/3P4/3Q4/PPP2PPP/RNB1K1NR

Caro-Kann Defence - Advance Variation[edit]

White can play 6. Be3, to prevent c5, which would open black's play. 6. Nc3 was played in the seminal 1927 defeat that Aron Nimzowitsch (playing as White) suffered at the hands of José Capablanca in one of their games at the New York 1927 tournament, and which led to the Advance variation falling from favour for white for a long time.

Theory table[edit]

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation.

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 Bf5 4.Bd3 Bxd3 5.Qxd3 e6

6
Be3
Nc3

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References[edit]