Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...c5/2. Nf3/2...Nc6/3. d4/3...cxd4/4. Nxd4/4...Nf6/5. Nc3/5...e5/6. Ndb5/6...d6

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< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. e4‎ | 1...c5‎ | 2. Nf3‎ | 2...Nc6‎ | 3. d4‎ | 3...cxd4‎ | 4. Nxd4‎ | 4...Nf6‎ | 5. Nc3‎ | 5...e5‎ | 6. Ndb5
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Sveshnikov Sicilian
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation (FEN)

r1bqkb1r/pp3ppp/2np1n2/1N2p3/4P3/2N5/PPP2PPP/R1BQKB1R

Sveshnikov Sicilian[edit]

Moves:1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 e5 6.Ndb5 d6

A little fact that is often forgotten by Sveshnikov players: the d5 square is genuinely weak and likely to remain so. Black's activity doesn't come easy but as compensation for taking on that weakness - an important distinction. White therefore has a logical mini-plan: occupy d5, preferably with a knight, preferably one that can't be instantly captured.

The immediate Nd5 has its followers, as the e-pawn is clearly immune from capture due to Nbc7+. This line was chosen four times by Fabiano Caruana in the World Chess Championship 2018 match against Magnus Carlsen. After Black plays 7...Nxd5, the nice outpost vanishes after 8.exd5 (8.Qxd5 a6 9. Nc3 Be6 is miserable - capturing on d5 with the queen is usually a sign that something's gone wrong). One plan for black is to play 8...Nb8 with ...Nd7 and ...f5 to follow. In their match, Carlsen also tried 8...Ne7 9.c4 Ng6.

White more often pins down the f6 knight with Bg5 - it's important to see this move as a means of increasing control of d5, rather than just pinning a knight out of boredom.

Theory table[edit]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 e5 6.Ndb5 d6

7 8 9 10 11
Bg5
a6
Na3
b5
Bxf6
gxf6
Nd5
f5
Bd3
Be6
+=
Nd5
Nxd5
exd5
Nb8!
c4
a6
Nc3
Bf5
=
a4
a6
Na3
Be7
Be3
Be6
=

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References[edit]

  • Batsford Chess Openings 2 (1989, 1994). Garry Kasparov, Raymond Keene. ISBN 0-8050-3409-9.