Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...Nf6/2. e5/2...Nd5/3. d4/3...d6/4. c4/4...Nb6/5. exd6/5...cxd6/6. Nc3

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< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. e4‎ | 1...Nf6‎ | 2. e5‎ | 2...Nd5‎ | 3. d4‎ | 3...d6‎ | 4. c4‎ | 4...Nb6‎ | 5. exd6‎ | 5...cxd6
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Alekhine's Defence
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation (FEN)

rnbqkb1r/pp2pppp/1n1p4/8/2PP4/2N5/PP3PPP/R1BQKBNR

Alekhine's Defence[edit]

Black would very much like to put pressure on the d-pawn with ...Nc6 and ...Bg7. Playing 6...Nc6 now however runs into d4-d5, maybe even on the next move, and the knight will find itself kicked around the board. So Black is in most games patient, and plays 6...g6 to prepare 7...Bg7.

6
...

g6

=

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References[edit]