Chess Opening Theory/1. b4/1...e5/2. Bb2/2...Bxb4

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< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. b4‎ | 1...e5‎ | 2. Bb2
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Sokolsky Opening
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

rnbqk1nr/pppp1ppp/8/4p3/1b6/8/PBPPPPPP/RN1QKBNR

Sokolsky Opening[edit]

2...Bxb4[edit]

Black takes the undefended pawn which almost definitely causes 3. Bxe5 from white. Now not only has black lost a central pawn for a flank pawn, but black also has to worry about white's threat on g7. However, white can play 3. f4!?. After this point, black can safely gain a more or less equal game with 3... d6 4. fxe5 dxe5 5. Bxe5 , where black has a slight advantage (due to white's weakened kingside and missing f-pawn), but has traded two central pawns for two flank pawns, which therefore reduces the advantage to almost nothing. On the other hand, black can accept the gambit with 3... exf4!?, where it results in wild play after 4. Bxb7 Qh4+! 5. g3 fxg3 6. Bg2! gxh2+ 7. Kf1 hxg1=Q+ 8. Kxg1 Qg3 9. Bxh8, where white has a rook and a pawn for a knight and three pawns. The board is wide open and both sides have possibilities. Nevertheless, computer evaluation has suggested that 3...Nh6! gives black a small advantage.

Theory table[edit]

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation

1. b4 e5 2. Bb2 Bxb4
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Bxe5
Nf6
Bxf6
Qxf6
=
...
f6
Bd4
=
f4!?
exf4!?
Bxb7
Qh4+!
g3
fxg3
Bg2!
gxh2+
Kf1
hxg1=Q+
Kxg1
Qg3
Bxh8
...
f4!?
d6
fxe5
dxe5
Bxe5
Nf6
Bxf6
Qxf6
=
f4!?
Nh6!
Bxe5
O-O!
e3
Nf5
Bd3
d5
Bxf5
Bxf5
Ne2
Nc6
O-O
Nxe5
=/+

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References[edit]

[1]