The Future of Feedback

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Primary Contributors: Douglas B. and Dwight W. Allen

iFeedback: The Future of Feedback[edit]

Why iFeedback[edit]

  • Accelerating and continuous change
  • Globalization
  • Teamwork and collaboration
  • Necessary for learning
  • Empowered individuals are more productive
  • Flattened organizations
  • Trust


Follow-on[edit]

Speed and flexibility


Principles of Effective Feedback[edit]

  • All learning is based on feedback and encouragement
  • Attention is the prerequisite
  • The importance of both intentional and non-intentional learning
  • Incidental learning
  • Serendipitous learning
  • Unexpected learning
  • Fortuitous learning
  • Service learning
  • Professional expertise
  • Just in time learning
  • Learning on demand
  • Secrets of 2+2


Common Shortcomings of Traditional Feedback Tools[edit]

  • Feared
  • Ineffective
  • Not timely
  • Laundry list
  • Generic, without useful detail
  • Little or no built-in follow-up or consequence
  • Not prioritized


Making Feedback a Habit[edit]

  • Overcoming fear of feedback
  • Learning to crave feedback
  • Understanding the value of real-time feedback
  • Learning to give successful feedback


2+2: An example of real-time feedback[edit]

  • The five secrets
    • Balanced
    • Timely
    • Focused
    • Specific
    • Follow-up

The Foundations of iFeedback[edit]

  • Data Entry
  • Digital Data
  • On-line Editing
  • Data Retrieval
  • Search Engines
  • Information Management
  • Information Access
  • Knowledge Generation
  • Assessment
  • Change


iLoops: Iterative Knowledge[edit]

  • Software version updates
  • Literary themes and plots
  • Movie remakes
  • Renovate and rebuild
  • Hybrids
  • Art and architecture styles
  • Open source
  • Wikis

iRoadblocks[edit]

  • Recognition and ownership
  • Fair compensation
  • Corruption and appropriation
  • Secrecy and proprietary rights
  • Confidentiality and privacy
  • Legal issues
  • Time
  • Access to technology
  • Confusion and messiness
  • Lack of stability
  • Compatibility
  • Keeping up and retraining


Next Steps[edit]

  • Embracing new technologies
  • Individual attitudes and skills
  • Management and administrative skills and attitudes
  • Organization change and development
  • Access to tools

See also[edit]

Contemporary Educational Psychology, especially Chapter 8, "Instructional Strategies".