Overview of Theology/Christian theology

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What is a modern Christian? Though society has become increasingly secularized, Christianity still believes in the God of the Bible as the one true faith. Scripturally, God testified to Hosea the prophet saying, "Yet I am the LORD thy God from the land of Egypt, and thou shalt know no god but me: for there is no Saviour beside me."

Though it comes from the same Abrahamic roots, Christianity differs from Islam and Judaism. Islam believes in a different perception of the God of the Bible, as well as the additional prophet Muhammad. Judaism is a religion that is said to have come from Abraham the father of Isaac. It is named for the Biblical tribe of Judah, and does not accept the New Testament, which is the basis of modern Christianity. The most influential Bible passage on Christian theology, besides John 3:16 is the Sermon on the Mount, contained in Matthew 5-7. These three chapters are the fundamental cornerstone for the apostles doctrine that we know to be Christianity. As a Jew, Jesus's lessons centered on the Law of Moses. According to Christian belief, we are not in bondage to the letter of the law but rather the law of Christ from the Sermon on the Mount.

Grace is a major concept of the faith, defined theologically as what we get when we are undeserving, sheerly from the forgiveness of God.