Easy Ido/Lesson two

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Verbs[edit]

Grammatical Form Verb Ending Example
Ido English
Present Tense Infinitive -ar vidar to see
Past Tense Infinitive -ir vidir to have seen
Future Tense Infinitive -or vidor to be going to see
Present -as vidas see
Past -is vidis saw
Future -os vidos will see
Imperative -ez videz look!
Conditional -us vidus would see

Note the correlations between the tenses of the infinitive and non-infinitive conjugations (future -o, past -i, present -a)

The verb "to be"[edit]

  • The verb "to be" is esar. Me esas (I am), Me esis (I was), Me esos (I will be).
  • You can just say es instead of esas if you feel like it. You use this verb all the time and that's why it has a short form.

Negative[edit]

To make a negative, just put ne before the verb. Me ne esas (I am not), ne flugas (doesn't fly), ne vidos (will not see).

Describing things with verbs[edit]

Active[edit]

  • Replacing -ar with -anta turns the verb into an adjective describing the thing that is doing an action. Fluganta uceli - flying birds. Kantanta viro - a singing man.
  • Replacing -ar with -inta turns the verb into an adjective describing the thing that has done an action. Fluginta uceli - birds that have flown. Kantinta viro - a man that has sung.
  • Replacing -ar with -onta turns the verb into an adjective describing the thing that is going to do an action. Flugonta uceli - birds that are going to fly. Kantonta viro - a man that is going to sing.

Passive[edit]

  • Replacing -ar with -ata turns the verb into an adjective describing the thing that is having something done to it. Drinkata aquo - water being drunk. Manjata pano - bread being eaten.
  • Replacing -ar with -ita turns the verb into an adjective describing the thing that had something done to it. Drinkita aquo - water that was drunk. Manjita pano - bread that was eaten.
  • Replacing -ar with -ota turns the verb into an adjective describing the thing that is going to have something done to it. Drinkota aquo - water that is going to be drunk. Manjota pano - bread that is going to be eaten.

Had and have[edit]

  • When saying things like "I have eaten," "I had gone," and "I will have sung," you use the endings -abas, -abis, and -abos. Me manjabas la pano (I have eaten the bread), me manjabis la pano (I had eaten the bread), me manjabos la pano (I will have eaten the bread).

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