Stunjelly

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Stunjelly
Characteristics
Alignment Neutral
Type Ooze
Publication history
First appearance Fiend Folio (1981)

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, the Stunjelly is an ooze. They are relatives of the Gelatinous cube that were created by a forgotten mage to act as sentries. Stunjellies resemble thick, grey, slightly transparent stone walls. Similar to the Gelatinous Cube, they do not have quite as amorphous forms as other oozes, and must retain their geometric, wall-esque shape. They live underground, and typically lurk in hallways, devouring all in their path.

Publication history[edit]

The stunjelly first appeared in first edition in the original Fiend Folio (1981).[1]

The stunjelly appeared in second edition in the Monstrous Compendium Fiend Folio Appendix (1992),[2] and reprinted in the Monstrous Manual (1993).[3] The massive stunjelly appears in Dungeon #75 (July 1999).

Characteristics and habits[edit]

Stunjellies attack, as their name suggests, by stunning (really more surprising) their victims. Adventurers walk by, sensing no danger due to the jelly looking like a wall, and when they have their back turned, the Stunjelly attacks with a anaesthetic pseudopod. The prey becomes paralyzed, and the jelly moves on top of them and engulfs them. Being not as acidic as other oozes, Stunjellies require brute strength to subdue prey. Their less-than-average acidity also means that they may have uncorrosed treasure, among other things, floating around inside them.

Stunjellies, due to having less amorphous forms than other Oozes and being unable to slip under doors into areas they are not desired, they are sometimes tolerated in dungeons to act as sentries, killing those that enter, or as janitorial creatures (they "clean up" by engulfing what is on the floor).

Stunjellies cannot speak, and they are regarded as neutral in alignment.

References[edit]

  1. Turnbull, Don, ed. Fiend Folio (TSR, 1981)
  2. Williams, Skip, et al. Monstrous Compendium Fiend Folio Appendix (TSR, 1992)
  3. Stewart, Doug, ed. Monstrous Manual (TSR, 1993)