Cookbook:Cuisine of Northern Ireland

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Cookbook | Recipes | Ingredients | Cuisines

Northern Irish food is generally heavily influenced by both Irish and British cuisine - A local interpretation of Irish stew consisting of either diced steak or minced beef is regularly eaten in the province, as is Fish and chips. However there are a few exceptions that are unique to Northern Ireland and difficult to find among either. A few examples include The 'Ulster Fry'- a Northern Irish interpretation of the English breakfast that traditionally includes Wheaten and/or Soda Bread. Another is 'pasties' often available at chip shops in Northern Ireland (not to confused with Cornish pasties), which consists of a burger-like patty made from minced pork and peppered vegetables deep fried in batter. It is often served in a bap and referred to as a 'pastie bap' or simply served with chips and referred to as a 'pastie supper'. A mainstay among Northern Irish dinners is 'Champ' - Or spring onions ('scallions' as they are often known as in the 6 counties) boiled in milk and mixed in with mashed potatoes with a bit of butter, often served as a compliment to a main ingredient such as steak or pork chops.