Circuit Idea/Bistable Mode of Current Inversion NIC

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Investigating the Bistable Mode of Negative Impedance Converters with Current Inversion


Circuit idea: Making the positive feedback dominate over the negative one.


INIC operating in bistable mode is a current-driven N-shaped true negative resistor.



Introduction[edit]

What a current inversion NIC to operate in bistable mode means[edit]

How to investigate the bistable mode of current inversion NIC[edit]

Fig. 1a: A hysteresis IV curve of current-driven INIC.
Fig. 1b: An N-shaped IV curve of voltage-driven INIC.


Investigating the circuit at ideal driving conditions[edit]

Increasing the input current[edit]

Negative input current, negative output voltage[edit]

Fig. 2a: Scanning the left bottom part (0 - 1) of the curve.
Fig. 2b: Sinking a current from INIC.


Zero input current, negative output voltage[edit]

Fig. 3a: Investigating the point 1 of the curve.
Fig. 3b: Sinking no current from INIC.


Positive input current, negative output voltage[edit]

Fig. 4a: Scanning the left top part (1 - 2) of the curve.
Fig. 4b: Injecting a current to INIC.


Voltage jump upward:[edit]

...start...[edit]
Fig. 5-1a: Investigating the starting point of the voltage jump.
Fig. 5-1b: Making the op-amp "jump" to the positive rail.


...middle...[edit]
Fig. 5-2a: Scanning the top jumping path (2 - 3).
Fig. 5-2b: The op-amp "jumps" to the positive rail.


...final[edit]
Fig. 5-3a: Investigating the final point of the voltage jump upward.
Fig. 5-3b: The op-amp "calms down" at the positive rail.


Positive input current, positive output voltage[edit]

Fig. 6a: Scanning the right top part (3 - 4) of the curve.
Fig. 6b: Injecting a big current to INIC.


Decreasing the input current[edit]

Positive input current, positive output voltage[edit]

Fig. 7a: Scanning the right top part (4 - 5) of the curve.
Fig. 7b: Injecting a current to INIC.


Zero input current, positive output voltage[edit]

Fig. 8a: Investigating the point 5 of the curve.
Fig. 8b: Injecting no current to VNIC.


Negative input current, positive output voltage[edit]

Fig. 9a: Scanning the right bottom part (5 - 6) of the curve.
Fig. 9b: Sinking a current from INIC.


Voltage jump downward:[edit]

...start...[edit]
Fig. 10-1a: Investigating the starting point of the voltage jump.
Fig. 10-1b: Making the op-amp "jump" to the negative rail.


...middle...[edit]
Fig. 10-2a: Scanning the bottom jumping path (6 - 7).
Fig. 10-2b: The op-amp "jumps" to the negative rail.


...final[edit]
Fig. 10-3a: Investigating the final point of the voltage jump downward.
Fig. 10-3b: The op-amp "calms down" at the negative rail.


Negative input current, negative output voltage[edit]

Fig. 11a: Scanning the left bottom part (7 - 0) of the curve.
Fig. 11b: Siniking a big current from INIC.


Investigating the circuit at real driving conditions[edit]

How to make INIC operate in bistable mode[edit]

What is the relation with the non-inverting comparator with hysteresis?[edit]

References[edit]


See also[edit]

Revealing the mystery of negative impedance
Investigating the linear mode of negative impedance converters with current inversion
Negative impedance converter from Wikipedia considers NIC with current inversion (INIC).

External links[edit]



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