User:Recent Runes/Grammar

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Subject pronouns[edit]

French has six different types of subject pronouns: the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd person singular and the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd person plural.

Number Person French English
singular 1st person je I
2nd person tu you
3rd person il, elle, on he, she, one
plural 1st person nous we
2nd person vous you
3rd person ils,
elles
they (masculine)
they (feminine)

The pronoun it does not exist in French. All masculine nouns (even those that are not human) are replaced by il. The same is true with feminine nouns and elle.

While the third person plural "they" has no gender in English, the French equivalents "ils" and "elles" do. However, when pronounced, they normally sound the same as "il" and "elle", so distinguishing the difference requires understanding of the various conjugations of the verbs following the pronoun. Also, if a group of people consists of both males and females, the male form is used, even with a majority of females — however, this sensibly yields to overwhelming majority: given a group of only one male to thousands of females, the female form would be used.

Examples:

  • Jack et Philipp jouent - Jack and Philipp play
    Ils jouent - They play (all-male group)
  • Jack et Lucy jouent - Jack and Lucy play
    Ils jouent - They play (mixed group)
  • Lucy et Dina jouent - Lucy and Dina play
    Elles jouent - They play (all female group)

Vous vs. tu[edit]

This is an important difference between French and English. English no longer distinguishes between the singular and the plural, formal version of "you", although "thou" used to be the informal singular version in the days of Shakespeare.

"Vous" is the plural form of "you". This is somewhat equivalent to "you all", "you guys", "all of you", except that it does not carry any familiarity when used with the plural. You'd use it to address your friends as well as when talking to the whole government at a press conference.

"Vous" is also used to refer to single individuals to show respect, to be polite or to be neutral. It is used when talking to someone who is important, someone who is older than you are, or someone with whom you are unfamiliar. This is known as Vouvoiement.

Conversely, "tu" is the singular and informal form of "vous" (you) in French. It is commonly used when referring to a friend or a family member, and is also used between children or when addressing a child. If it is used when speaking to a stranger, it signals disrespect. This is known as Tutoiement. If uncertain, it is best to begin by using "vous" and wait for the other person to suggest the use of "tu". The use of "vous" is less common in Quebequois than in French from France.

Grammatically, even the singular form of "vous" behaves as though it were a plural, so even if you are addressing only one person, you would still use verbal grammar consistent with addressing multiple people, similar to English (as in "you are", "you [all] are", "they are.") Nevertheless, related adjectives or past participles need to use singular or plural endings according to the actual number of people present.

Examples, addressing one person:

  • Tu gagnes - you win (informal)
  • Vous gagnez - you win (polite) - (also, to address many persons)
  • Tu es costaud - You are tough (informal)
  • Vous êtes accrocheur - You are determined (polite, male)
  • Vous êtes accrocheuse - You are determined (polite, female)

Examples, addressing many people:

  • Vous êtes forts - You are strong (informal or polite, male, many persons)
  • Vous êtes fortes - You are strong (informal or polite, female, many persons)

The pronoun on[edit]

The French third person "on" has several meanings, but most closely matches the now archaic English "one". While in English, "One must be very careful in French grammar" sounds old-fashioned, the French equivalent "On doit faire très attention à la grammaire française" is quite acceptable.

The subject pronoun on is similar to the English personal pronoun one, except that it is not so formal, and is more common. It has a number of uses:

  • It is used in the same ways as the English personal pronoun one: e.g.
    • It is used in expressing generalities: « C'est en jouant qu'on devient joueur. » ("It is by playing that one becomes a player.")
    • It is the implicit subject for an infinitive that has no other implicit subject: « penser qu'on a raison » ("to think that one is right," i.e. "to think oneself right").
  • Because of French's limited passive voice, it is often used as an empty subject when the agent is unknown or unimportant: « On nous l'a prété. » ("[On] loaned him to us" or "They loaned him to us" or "He was loaned to us.")
  • It is used as a less formal substitute for the subject pronoun nous (we). In this case, note that even though on always takes a third-person singular verb, it takes plural adjectives (« On est britanniques », "We're British"). Also, note that the other forms of nous (direct object, indirect object, and disjunctive) are not replaced by forms of on unless on is the subject as well. (Hence, « Ils nous l'ont donné », "They gave it to us," but « On se l'est donné », "We gave it to ourselves.")
  • It is not the number 1, and therefore is not used to mean "one of them." In French as in English, numbers can be used as pronouns — « Deux sont entrés et un est ressorti », "Two went in and one came back out" — but the number 1 is un(e), not on.

On does not have ordinary direct- and indirect-object pronouns, only the reflexive pronoun se. Similarly, its disjunctive-pronoun form, soi, is only used when on is the subject and soi refers to the same entity. The pronoun quelqu'un ("someone") can fill some of the roles of on, in the same way that one and someone are sometimes interchangeable in English.

In everyday language, “on” is used, instead of “nous”, to express “we”; the verb is always used in the 3rd person singular. For example, to say "We (are) meeting at 7 o'clock", you could say either “On se rencontre au cinéma à sept heures.” (colloquial) or “Nous nous rencontrons au cinéma à sept heures.” (formal) (there are two words "nous", meaning "we" and "ourselves"). For more, see the Wikipedia entry.

Use of titles instead of pronouns[edit]

Monsieur, Madame and Mademoiselle are the French equivalents of Mr, Mrs and Miss, but they are used more frequently in formal conversation and where in English we might use a personal pronoun. (see User:Recent Runes/Sentences for examples)

Direct Object Pronouns[edit]

Direct Objects[edit]

While the subject of a sentence initiates an action (the verb), the direct object is the one that is affected by the action. A direct object pronoun can be used to refer to the direct object of a previous sentence:

Pierre voit le cambrioleur. Pierre sees the burglar.
Pierre le voit. Pierre sees him.

The following table shows the various types of direct object pronouns:

Number Person French English
singular 1st person me, m' me1
2nd person te, t' you1
3rd person le, l' him, it
la, l' her, it
plural 1st person nous us1
2nd person vous you1
3rd person les them

Notes:

  • 1 me, te, nous, and vous are also used as indirect objects to mean to me, to you, to us, and to you respectively.
  • The pronoun form with an apostrophe is used before a vowel.
  • The direct object pronoun for nous and vous is the same as the subject.
  • When the direct object comes before a verb in a perfect tense, a tense that uses a past participle, the direct object must agree in gender and plurality with the past participle. For example, in the phrase Je les ai eus, or I had them, the past participle would be spelled eus if the direct object, les, was referring to a masculine object, and eues if les is referring to a feminine object.

l', le, la, and les[edit]

The words l', le, la, and les which are used to mean "the" are also used as direct object pronouns.

  • Il jette le ballon. - He throws the ball.

In the above sentence le ballon is the direct object.

You have learned earlier that names and regular nouns can be replaced by the subject pronouns (je, tu...). Similarly, direct objects, such as "le ballon", can be replaced by pronouns. These are a different set of pronouns (accusative). As in English, you would say "She gave him," and not "Her gave he." He/she are subjects used in the nominative case, while him/her are direct objects used in the accusative case.

  • le - replaces a masculine singular direct object ("him" or "it")
  • la - replaces a feminine singular direct object ("her" or "it")
  • l' - replaces le and la if they come before a vowel
  • les - replaces plural direct objects, both masculine and feminine

The direct object pronouns come before the verb they are linked to.

  • Il le jette. - He throws it.
  • Il les jettes. - He throws them.

Le, la, and les can replace either people or inanimate objects.

Direct object replacement[edit]

  • Il me supporte. - He supports me.
  • Il te supporte. - He supports you.
  • Il nous supporte. - He supports us.
  • Il vous supporte. - He supports you.

Place in sentences[edit]

  • These pronouns are placed before the verb that they modify
    • Je te bat. - I am beating you.
    • Je veux te battre. - I want to beat you.
  • If a perfect tense is used, these pronouns go before the auxiliary verb.
    • Je t'ai battu. - I have beaten you.

Indirect Objects[edit]

An indirect object is an object that would be asked for with To whom...? or From whom...?. It is called indirect because it occurs usually together with a direct object which is affected directly by the action:

Il donne du pain à Pierre. He gives some bread to Pierre.
Il lui donne du pain. He gives bread to him.

The following table shows the various types of indirect object pronouns:

Number Person French English
singular 1st person me, m' to me1
2nd person te, t' to you1
3rd person lui' to him, to her
plural 1st person nous to us1
2nd person vous to you1
3rd person leur to them

Notes:

  • 1 me, te, nous, and vous are also used as direct objects to mean me, you, us, and you respectively.
  • The pronoun form with an apostrophe is used before a vowel.
  • The indirect object pronoun for nous and vous is the same as the subject.
  • The indirect object pronouns do not agree with the past participle like the direct object pronouns do. When me, te, nous, and vous are used in a perfect tense, the writer must decide whether they are used as direct or indirect object pronouns. This is done by looking at the verb and seeing what type of action is being performed.

The bread is given by the man (direct). Pierre gets the given bread (indirect).

lui and leur[edit]

Indirect objects are prepositional phrases with the object of the preposition. An indirect object is a noun that receives the action of a verb.

  • Il montre le carton jaune à Jacques. - He shows the yellow card to Jack.
  • Il montre le carton jaune à Marie. - He shows the yellow card to Mary.
  • Il montre le carton jaune à Jacques et Marie. - He shows the yellow card to Jack and Mary.

Lui and leur are indirect object pronouns. They replace nouns referring to people and mean to him/her and to them respectively.

  • lui - replaces a singular masculine or feminine indirect object referring to a person
  • leur - replaces a plural masculine or feminine indirect object referring to a person

An example follows:

  • Il lui montre le carton rouge. - He shows the red card to him.
  • Il lui montre le carton rouge. - He shows the red card to her.
  • Il leur montre le carton rouge. - He shows the red card to them.

Whether lui means to him or to her is given by context.

In English, "He shows him the red card" is also said, and means the same thing.

When used with the direct object pronouns le, la, and les, lui and leur come after those pronouns.

  • Il le lui passe. - He passes it to him.

Note that while le, la, and les are used to replace people or inanimate objects, lui and leur are not used to replace inanimate objects and things.

Also note that unlike le and la, which are shortened to l' when followed by a vowel, lui is never shortened.

Indirect Object Replacement[edit]

  • Il m'appelle. - He calls to me.
  • Il te le donne. - He gives it to you.
  • Il nous le donne. - He gives it to us.
  • Il vous le donne. - He gives it to you.

The pronoun y[edit]

Indirect object pronoun - to it, to them[edit]

The French pronoun y is used to replace an object of a phrase introduced by a preposition.

  • Je crois en la montée. - J'y crois.
  • I believe in promotion. - I believe in it.

Note that lui and leur, and not y, are used when the object refers to a person or persons.

Replacement of places - there[edit]

The French pronoun y replaces a prepositional phrase referring to a place that begins with any preposition except de (for which en is used).

  • Les clubs promus vont en Ligue 1. - Les clubs promus y vont.
  • The promoted clubs go to Ligue 1. - The promoted clubs go there.

Note that en, and not y is used when the object is of the preposition de.

Idioms[edit]

  • Ça y est! - It's done!
  • J'y suis! - I get it!
  • Vous y êtes? - Are you ready?

En[edit]

To say 'some of it' without specifying the exact object, the pronoun 'en' can be used. Additionally, 'en' can mean 'of it' when 'it' is not specified. For instance, instead of saying J'ai besoin d'argent, if the idea of money has already been raised, it can be stated as 'J'en ai besoin'. This is because en replaces du, de la or des when there the noun is not specifically mentioned in that sentence.

Like with 'me', 'te' and other pronouns, en (meaning 'some') comes before the verb.

Tu joues du piano? Non, je n'en joue pas Do you play piano? No, I don't play it.
Vous prenez du poisson? Oui, j'en prends. Are you having fish? Yes, I'm having some.
Vous avez commandé de l'eau? Oui, nous en avons commandé. Did you order some water? Yes, we ordered some.

Replacement of a partitive construction[edit]

  • The pronoun en replaces a noun with a partitive article (l'article partitif: du, de la, de, des) at the front. In this case En goes always with the singular, even if there are many items adressed.
    • Je veux du temps de jeu. → J'en veux. - I want some playing time. → I want some.

Replacement of quantified nouns[edit]

If the quantity of the object is specified, "en" is used for the replacement of the noun.

Example: Il a acheté deux billets. → Il en a acheté deux. - He bought two tickets → He bought two (of them).

Note that no agreement is needed between the past participle (le participe passé) and the object (complément d'objet direct).

Replacement of phrases with de[edit]

  • The pronoun en replaces prepositional phrases beginning with de if the object of the preposition is referring to a thing or place.
    • Je viens de Paris. - I come from Paris.
    • J'en viens. - I come from it.
  • Note that stress pronouns, and not en are used if the object refers to a person or persons.

Pronoun order[edit]

Order chart[edit]

If a sentence uses no infinitive, the pronouns are embedded as follows:

Subject
Pronoun
(or noun)
Neg Direct or
Indirect
Direct Obj
Pronouns
Indirect
Objects
Neg
je
tu
il (elle)
nous
vous
ils (elles)
ne me
te
nous
vous
se (reflexive)
le
la
l'
les
lui
leur
y en conjugated
verb
pas
plus
etc...
past
participle

If a sentence uses an infinitive, the pronouns are embedded as follows:

Subject
Pronoun
(or noun)
Neg Neg Direct or
Indirect
Direct Obj
Pronouns
Indirect
Objects
je
tu
il (elle)
nous
vous
ils (elles)
ne conjugated
verb
pas
plus
etc...
past
participle
me
te
nous
vous
se (reflexive)
le
la
l'
les
lui
leur
y en infinitive

Order rules[edit]

  • When a sentence uses the indirect object pronouns me, te, nous, and vous with the direct object pronouns le, la, and les, me, te, nous, and vous go first.
    • Il me le donne. - He gave it to me.
  • When a sentence uses the indirect object pronouns lui and leur with the direct object pronouns le, la, and l', le, la, and les go first.
    • Il le lui donne. - He gave it to him/her.
  • When y is used in the same sentence as other pronouns, y goes after all of them with the exception of en.
    • Il m'emmène à l'entraînement. - He takes me to training.
    • Il m'y emmène. - He takes me there.
  • Y in conjunction with en is only used in a few cases.
    • Il y en a. - There exist several (of them).
    • Est-ce qu'il y a des billets? (Oui,) il y en a. (Non,) il n'y en a (pas/plus). - Are there any tickets (left)? Yes, there are. No, there aren't.
  • When there are two pronouns in a sentence, en always go last.

L'impératif[edit]

When expressing positive commands, there are several rules one must remember when using object pronouns. Theses are:

  • The pronouns are attached to the verb with a hyphen.
    • Retrouve-la. - Find it.
  • Me and Te become moi and toi.
    • Donnez-moi les résultats. - Give me the results.
  • Le, la, and les precede all other object pronouns.
    • Donnez-le-moi. - Give it to me.
  • For the second person singular form, an "s" is added if the object (in the pronoun form) begins with a vowel or "y".
    • Va aux vestiaires. - Go to the changing rooms. BUT Vas-y. - Go (there).
    • Vas-y. - Come on.

Possessive pronouns[edit]

Possessive pronouns are equivalent to "mine", "yours" etc and replace possessive adjective + noun sets. e.g.

  • Vous avez vos billets? - You have your tickets?
  • Oui, nous avons les nôtres. - Yes, we have ours.

Like the possessive adjectives "mon", "ma", "mes" etc. the possessive pronouns agree in gender with the noun that is being replaced, as shown in this table. (Note that "le", "la" and "les" are essential parts of the possessive pronouns.)


Grammar
Possessive Pronouns · Les pronoms possesifs
masculine singular masculine plural feminine singular feminine plural
mon copain
my friend
le mien
mine
mes copains
my friends
les miens
mine
ma copine
my friend
la mienne
mine
mes copines
my friends
les miennes
mine
ton copain
your friend
le tien
yours
tes copains
your friends
les tiens
yours
ta copine
your friend
la tienne
yours
tes copines
your friends
les tiennes
yours
son copain
his/her friend
le sien
his/hers
ses copains
his/her friends
les siens
his/hers
sa copine
his/her friend
la sienne
his/hers
ses copines
his/her friends
es siennes
his/hers
notre copain
our friend
le nôtre
ours
nos copains
our friends
les nôtres
ours
notre copine
our friend
la nôtre
ours
nos copines
our friends
les nôtres
ours
votre copain
your friend
le vôtre
yours
vos copains
your friends
les vôtres
yours
votre copine
your friend
la vôtre
yours
vos copines
your friends
les vôtres
yours
leur copain
their friend
le leur
theirs
leurs copains
their friends
les leurs
theirs
leurs copine
their friend
la leur
theirs
leurs copines
their friends
les leurs
theirs

Reflexive pronouns[edit]

Number Person French English
singular 1st person me, m' myself
2nd person te, t' yourself
3rd person se, s' himself, herself, oneself
plural 1st person nous ourselves
2nd person vous yourselves
3rd person se, s' themselves

Stressed pronouns[edit]

À + a stressed pronoun is used when the noun replaced is also the subject of the sentence. This usually occurs in sentences with être.

  • Elle est ta voiture? - Is that your car?
  • Oui, elle est à moi. - Yes, it is mine.
Number Person French English
singular 1st person moi me
2nd person toi you
3rd person lui, elle, soi him, her, one
plural 1st person nous us
2nd person vous you
3rd person eux,
elles
them (masculine)
them (feminine)

Relative Pronouns Qui and Que[edit]

Les pronoms relatifs qui et que

  • relative pronouns begin adjective clauses
    • the man that was here
    • the man that I saw
  • qui is the subject of the clause it introduces
    • Je vois l'homme qui l'a fait. - I see the man that did it.
    • L'homme qui l'a fait est ici. - The man that did it is here.
  • que is the direct object of the clause it introduces
    • Il est l'homme que j'ai vu. - He is the man that I have seen.
  • remember that in perfect tenses, the past participle agrees with the direct object in gender and plurality if the direct object comes before the verb
    • Elles sont les femmes que j'ai vues. - They are the women that I have seen.
  • If que is followed by a vowel, it is shortened to qu'.
    • Il est l'homme qu'il a vu. - He is the man that he has seen.
  • qui is never shortened, even when followed by a vowel
  • qui and que can modify both people and things
    • Je vois la voiture qui est cassé. - I see the car that is broken.
  • qui and que can modify both masculine and feminine nouns
  • qui and que can modify both singular and plural nouns
  • in the phrases ce qui and ce que, which literally mean that which, but more naturally mean what, ce is the noun.

References[edit]

Main page: w:French personal pronouns

Acknowledgements[edit]

This page is based on original text from French/Grammar/Pronouns dated 23rd October 2009.