History of wireless telegraphy and broadcasting in Australia/Topical/Publications/Australasian Radio World/Issues/1937 05

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Link to Issue PDF[edit]

WorldRadioHistory.com's scan of Australasian Radio World - Vol. 02 No. 01 - May 1937 has been utilised to create the partial content for this page and can be downloaded at this link to further extend the content and enable further text correction of this issue: ARW 1937 05

In general, only content which is required for other articles in this Wikibook has been entered here and text corrected. The material has been extensively used, inter alia, for compilation of biographical articles, radio club articles and station articles.

Front Cover[edit]

The Australasian Radio World

MAY 1, 1937; Vol. 2 - No. 1; Price, 1/-

Registered at the G.P.O., Sydney, for transmission by post as a periodical

Cover Photo: Photo of Dr. G. Builder, manager AWA Laboratory, Ashfield (See Page 8)

Highlighted Contents: 1937 Amateur Radio Show Review: More About the "International": The "1937 Empire All-Wave Three": Inverse Feedback Conquers Pentode Tone: Latest Shortwave News.

Inside Front Cover - Ever Ready Co. Ad[edit]

P.01 - Radiokes Ad[edit]

P.02 - Editorial Notes[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

In a news release recently to hand from the States, Mr. Alfred A. Ghirardi, noted radio writer, states that one important trend in radio today lies in the rapidly growing use by servicemen of the cathode ray oscillograph. Undoubtedly this new device is destined for a very important future in the radio service field. As a tool in the hand of a capable serviceman, its applications are almost endless, while just as important as its flexibility is its value as a time saver. In servicing as in any other profession, time means money, and any device that can locate faults in half an hour that otherwise might take half a day to find is a far more than worthwhile investment. According to Mr. Ghirardi, servicemen in the States are, as could be expected, using oscillographs chiefly for alignment work. However, other common uses include the measuring of capacity and inductance, testing overall receiver sensitivity and overall audio fidelity, localising audio distortion, and checking receivers for intermittent reception. Several progressive manufacturers of test equipment in this country have recently marketed oscillographs designed for service work. The price factor, often a problem with servicemen, has in one case at least been taken care of by the use of the latest type 913 1-inch cathode ray tube. This makes possible the marketing of a complete oscillograph for around £20 -a figure well within the means of most servicemen who regard the purchase of equipment of this type not as an expense, but an investment that will mean increased and more profitable business. Further trends in the radio industry that were noted by Mr. Ghirardi during a nation-wide trip include the new interest in progressive merchandising and business promotion methods by even small radio dealers, and the rapid growth of the use of public address and intercommunication systems, particularly for retail stores. Finally, Mr. Ghirardi also comments on the prevalence of parts departments in radio stores throughout the country, indicating renewed interest and activity on the part of experimenters.

P.02 - Contents Banner[edit]

The Australasian Radio World

Incorporating the

All-Wave All-World DX News

Managing Editor - A. Earl Read, B.Sc.

Vol. 2. - MAY, 1937 - No. 1.

P.02 - Contents[edit]

CONTENTS:

"Radio World" Guide To The Show ...................... 3

The 1937 Empire All-Wave Three ...................... 6

Assembling, Wiring And Aligning The 1937 International All-Wave Six ...................... 10

Radio Ramblings .......................................................................... 14

The Story Of Television (5) ..................................................... 18

Breaking Into The Amateur Game ............................................ 20

Keeping In Touch With Darwin .................................................. 23

25 Years In Amateur Radio (1) ................................................ 24

Seven-Valve Dual-Waver Gives Excellent Results .................... 26

Inverse Feedback Conquers "Pentode Tone"! ........................... 28

Image Frequency Interference On The Short Waves ............ 30

Round The N.Z. "B" Stations (3) ............................................ 32

Latest Radiokes Tri-Colour Dial A Striking Success ............ 35

The A.T.R.S. Bulletin ...................................................... 36

Radio Step By Step (8) ................................................................ 38

"Keep Up The Good Work" ........................................................ 40

All-Wave All-World DX News ................................................... 41

All-Continent Hook-Up In 15 Minutes ........................................ 42

Leaves From A Dxer's Log Book ..............................................43

DX Notes And News .................................................................. 45

North Suburban Radio Club News ............................................ 47

What's New In Radio ................................................................. 48

P.02 - Publication Notes[edit]

The "Australasian Radio World" is published monthly by Trade Publications Proprietary, Ltd. Editorial offices, 214 George Street, Sydney, N.S.W. Telephone BW6577. Cable address: "Repress," Sydney. Advertisers please note that copy should reach office of publication by 15th of month preceding that specified for insertion.

Subscription rates: 1/- per copy, 10/6 per year ( 12 issues) post free to Australia and New Zealand. Subscribers in New Zealand can remit by Postal Note or Money Order.

Printed by Bridge Printery, 214 George Street, Sydney, N.S.W., for the proprietors of the "Australasian Radio World," 214 George St., Sydney (Footnote P.48)

P.02 - "Radio World" Guide To The Show[edit]

P.06 - The 1937 Empire All-Wave Three[edit]

P.10 - Assembling, Wiring And Aligning The 1937 International All-Wave Six[edit]

P.14 - Radio Ramblings[edit]

P.18 - The Story Of Television ( 5)[edit]

P.20 - Breaking Into The Amateur Game[edit]

P.23 - Keeping In Touch With Darwin[edit]

P.24 - 25 Years In Amateur Radio (1)[edit]

P.26 - Seven-Valve Dual-Waver Gives Excellent Results[edit]

P.28 - Inverse Feedback Conquers "Pentode Tone"![edit]

P.30 - Image Frequency Interference On The Short Waves[edit]

P.32 - Round The N.Z. "B" Stations (3)[edit]

Round the N.Z. "B" Stations . . . . 3

2ZO Palmerston North. The third of a series of articles on New Zealand "B" stations, written for the "Radio World" by "THE SOUTHLANDER" ("The Southlander" was Merv Branks, then of Winton, later Invercargill - Ed.)

STATION 2ZO, Palmerston North, which was designed and built by its owner, Mr. J. V. Kyle, is unique among "B" class stations in New Zealand, inasmuch as it has always been operated by its owner entirely as a hobby. It has never transmitted sponsored programmes or advertising matter, while everyone connected with 2ZO gives his or her services in a purely voluntary capacity. Commenced Operations In 1930. 2ZO owes its existence to the many interested listeners who, after hearing Mr. Kyle operating his shortwave station ZL2AX, suggested that he should apply for a broadcast band license. Thus 2ZO came on the air in November 1930, transmitting on very low power until the arrival of higher-powered equipment and valves from overseas. These duly came to hand and the opening night was fixed for February 3, 1931. Strangely this happened to be the very day of the disastrous earthquake in the Hawkes Bay province, which adjoins the Palmerston North district. Immediately Mr. Kyle offered the use of his short-wave station to the authorities, and ZL2AX was kept in constant use for two days, sending and receiving messages to and from the afflicted area. The official opening had to be postponed in this emergency, but a most successful initial programme from the new transmitter took place on March 3. Listeners' Association Provides The Programmes. Associated with 2ZO today is a Listeners' Association of over 2,000 members, who provide the programmes for transmission and pay the running costs of the station. The power supply to the transmitter is from a 1,500-watt motor generator, direct coupled to a 3-phase 3 h.p. motor, with a separate exciter, also direct coupled. This apparatus, which is electrically shielded, is situated some distance from the transmitting room to eliminate any mechanical noise being picked up by the microphones. The power reaches the power control panel (the left hand panel shown in photo) and is smoothed out and filtered before being applied to the valves. Transmitter Is Crystal Controlled. The station was recently remodelled, incorporating crystal control and 100 per cent modulation. The oscillator panel is seen second from the left in the photograph, and the modulator panel, third from the left. Next is the speech amplifier cabinet with control panel in front. An electric turntable is used for records and there are two microphones, one a double-button type and the other a condenser mike. The power is 100 watts to the aerial. The antenna system is somewhat different to that of most stations, only one mast 51 feet high being used. The aerial is an umbrella type with a four-wire fan as centrepoise (sic, counterpoise). The station has two studios, one located beside the actual transmitting room and used for individual artists. The other, approximately a mile away, is situated in the Messrs. C. Ross Coy's. Buildings in The Square. Well furnished and fully equipped, this studio is large enough to accommodate a full orchestra as well as a large audience, and all concerts, etc. are broadcast from there. The whole station reflects credit on Mr. Kyle, who is one of the earliest amateurs in New Zealand, his radio experience dating back to 1911. 2ZO is also official publicity station for the New Zealand Amateur Transmitters' Association. The station is a dual one, in that by changing three coils and two radio frequency chokes, a changeover from b.c. to s.w., or vice versa, can be made in three minutes. Mr. Kyle has received reports of correct reception from Australia, over a distance of 1,450 miles, while the area effectively served is the lower half of the North Island and the upper portion of the South Island. (Note: Transmission times given in the accompanying panel are A.E.S.T.)

Photo of 2ZO[edit]

(Start Photo Caption) A general view of station 2ZO, Palmerston North, which is operated by its owner purely as a hobby. (End Photo Caption)

Main Features of 2ZO[edit]

CALL AND LOCATION: 2ZO, 50 Waldegrave Street, Pa1merston North, New Zealand. OWNER AND OPERATOR: J. V. Kyle. ANNOUNCERS: D. Spring, E. A. Shackleton, and owner. FREQUENCY: 1,400 k.c. POWER: 100 watts aerial rating. TRANSMISSION TIMES: Tuesday, 5-8.30 p.m.; Thursday, 6-8.30 p.m.; Sunday, 8.30-11 a.m. TYPE OF TRANSMITTER: 3-stage crystal M.O.P.A. ANTENNA: Umbrella type and counterpoise. RELIABLE RANGE OF DAY TRANSMISSION: 200 miles. AREA SERVED: Lower half North Island and upper half South Island. LONGEST DISTANCE VERIFIED REPORT: 1,450 miles. VALUE OF EQUIPMENT: £1,075.

P.35 - Latest Radiokes Tri-Colour Dial A Striking Success[edit]

P.36 - The A.T.R.S. Bulletin[edit]

P.38 - Radio Step By Step (8)[edit]

P.40 - "Keep Up The Good Work"[edit]

P.41 - All-Wave All-World DX News[edit]

P.42 - All-Continent Hook-Up In 15 Minutes[edit]

P.43 - Leaves From A Dxer's Log Book[edit]

P.45 - DX Notes And News[edit]

P.47 - North Suburban Radio Club News[edit]

P.48 - What's New In Radio[edit]