History of wireless telegraphy and broadcasting in Australia/Topical/Biographies/Alfred George Jackson/Notes

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Alfred George Jackson - Transcriptions and notes[edit]

Overview[edit]

1925 09 13 - Brief Biography[edit]

Brief biography of Alfred George Jackson

PERSONAL and Anecdotal. . . . Mr. Alfred George Jackson, well known in electrical circles, commenced the serious part of life as an apprentice to chemical engineering at Manchester, where he was born and educated. When he came to Australia he spent a few years in Sydney, Mount Morgan, Charters Towers, and other places, before he settled down in Brisbane as an electrician, and then started in business for himself. He became a partner with A. G. Harris (sic, Harriss), whom he afterwards bought out, and formed the business into a limited company with the sole rights of the Synchronome Electrical Company of Australasia Ltd. Mr. Jackson has the distinction of carrying out the first installation of electric lighting of shops in Charters Towers. In his younger days he was a champion lacrosse player in the Lancashire County team, and on one occasion played with the All England lacrosse team against the All American team at Manchester. He also played in interstate teams, representing both New South Wales and Queensland. [1]

1929 09 29 - Brief Biography[edit]

Brief biography of Alfred George Jackson

PERSONAL AND ANECDOTAL. . . . Closely associated with the progress of wireless in Queensland is Mr. A. G. Jackson, A.M.I.E.E. (London), who will celebrate the anniversary of his birthday on October 3. During the war he was one of the few who were allowed a licence for that period. Mr. Jackson is the managing director of the Synchronome Electrical Company of Australia Ltd., and a shareholder in various other companies. A native of Manchester, England, he received his education at the Manchester Grammar school and Owen's College, Victoria University, Manchester. In 1882 he commenced his professional career as an apprentice to chemical engineering, and came to Australia in 1887. After spending a few years in Sydney, Mount Morgan, Charters Towers, and other places Mr. Jackson finally settled in Brisbane, joining the staff of Barton and White as an electrician. Whilst in Charters Towers, Mr. Jackson carried out the first installation of electric lighting in that town. He started in business for himself as an electrical engineer in 1896, and in 1904 floated the business into a limited company. In his youthful days he was a prominent lacrosse player with the Lancashire County team, and represented England against the American team in Manchester in 1885. He also played in New South Wales and Queensland teams. Afterwards he took to bowls playing with South Brisbane and Balmoral clubs, and he was one of the promoters of the Wynnum club. [2]

1933 05 27 - Professional Biography[edit]

A rambling overview of the professional life of Alfred George Jackson

A NODDING ACQUAINTANCE with OLD FATHER TIME. By A. H. THOMAS. MR. JACKSON is now 70 years of age. But in his dealings with Father Time the associations seem to have been very happy for that dignitary has dealt very kindly with Mr. Jackson. His 70 years sit very lightly on his shoulders. Active in mind and body and with an outlook which still retains the burning zeal of the pure scientist rather than the baser mercenary motives of the man of business, he can look back over the years and tell a story which is fascinating in its manysidedness and in its variety. Mr. Jackson can still see romance in his work. His mind still moves sturdily to the impulse of a stiff mechanical or electrical problem. It still stirs his imagination. AN EGG STORY. It is this imagination in him which brings to light one remarkable story. The City Hall clock is a far more distinguished member of the clock aristocracy than most citizens realise. It has mechanical appliances which are found in no other clock in the world, and it is the biggest of Its kind in the Commonwealth. How did Mr. Jackson come to evolve some of this mechanism? Thereby hangs a tale. The history of science bristles with examples of discoveries made by accident. No fiction writer could have imagined the trend of events which led to the designing of certain appliances in that clock. For the imagination cannot jump in one bound from city hall clock mechanisms to — the preservation of eggs. In 1912 a gentleman approached the Queensland Government with a simple device for the preservation of eggs. It was so ridiculously simple that the Government decided to give it a trial. Arguing that an egg went bad merely because the yolk was allowed to come in direct contact with the shell, this man maintained that if the yolk was prevented from making this contact with the shell by mechanical means it would keep in good condition for an indefinite period. All that was required was a method of turning the egg over once in 24 hours. This man asked Mr. Jackson to devise a mechanism which would revolve a ship's tank containing 2,000 eggs once in 24 hours, by a slow continuous rotary motion. The machinery was designed and built and the experiment commenced. At the end of three months the eggs were found to be in perfect condition. It was in the designing of that mechanism which had peculiar features that Mr. Jackson was able to solve some of the most important mechanical difficulties in the construction of the City Hall clock 20 years later. BACK TO THE SEVENTIES. But we have jumped far ahead of our story. His story really begins in the late seventies when as a student at the Manchester University he saw and spoke through the first telephone ever brought to England and displayed purely as a scientific novelty. The line was "rigged" from one room to another and speech through the apparatus was considered the last word in scientific achievement. Then, in 1882, although arc lamps, with carbon points, had been in use for some time, Swan, the famous London electrician, demonstrated his first incandescent lamp in London, and in the same year Mr. Jackson saw the self-same demonstration in Manchester. People actually paid for admission to see a rather feeble electric lamp shedding a very meagre light. Even before that time, in the seventies, Mr. Jackson remembers a demonstration at which thousands attended, of an arc lamp, given on the roof of the Princess Theatre, Manchester, of some enormous candle power, but run from Bunsen batteries which did not last very long. The dynamo electric machine was not in use at that time. In 1879 Mr. Jackson made his first electromotor to run from batteries which being successful induced him to make others for his friends. The wonderful world clock by which time in any part of the globe can be seen at a glance. Top: The master clock at the City Hall. Right: The indicator Board in Mr. Jackson's office by which time faults in the City Hall clock are soon detected. (Start Photo Caption) Mr. Jackson photographed with his historic phonograph on August 20, 1891. (End Photo Caption) FIRST ELECTRIC PLANT. Then Mr. Jackson came to Australia. He was associated with the first electric lighting in Sydney, but his first installation of electric light that he undertook personally in Australia was in Charters Towers in 1887. In those days, of course, only arc lamps were is use for public lighting, and at one time it was necessary for the carbons in every street lamp to be changed daily. In 1890, after doing a good deal of work for electrical firms in Sydney, he came to Brisbane. Here he installed the first public night lighting in the State, to illuminate pony races at the Exhibition Ground (on its present site). The plant was erected on the hill overlooking the grounds, and eight or nine arc lamps in series illuminated the grounds. He tells an amusing story, which throws some light on the conditions under which pony racing was conducted at the time. One evening the man who was "running the show" got word that he was to be robbed of the takings late in the evening. He therefore instructed Mr. Jackson to switch off the light at a specified time for a few minutes. This was done, and the manager made his getaway in the dark. THE STORY OF THE PHONOGRAPH. The most fascinating section of Mr. Jackson's story, however, has to do with the first Edison phonograph brought to Queensland by the firm of Barton and White, which Mr. Jackson had joined in 1890. It was a phonograph typical of the early box and horn type with the cylindrical records. But the mechanical governor motor had not been thought of in those days and the machine was run by electricity off batteries. Hark, ye people who grumble today because a good electrical gramophone costs £50, Barton and White paid £200 for that little box of tricks. What is even more amazing, they got their money back in a week by public demonstrations during Exhibition Week in 1891. One Christmas Eve over £80 was taken. NOT SEALING WAX, BUT — Wise in their time and generation, Messrs. Barton and White quickly realised that the mere payment of admission to a room to hear the phonograph being played in the ordinary way was not good for business. So they fitted to the machine about a dozen gadgets which were in effect earphones, but which resembled more our modern doctor's stethoscope, two metallic terminals fitting right into the ears of the listener. (See photograph.) In this way a dozen people could listen at one time at a charge of 6d. or 1s. Often when business was brisk they were allowed to hear only half a record in this way when they were bustled out of the way to make room for others in the long waiting queue. "At the end of a long day," said Mr. Jackson, "you've no idea what those ear pieces were like. They wore thoroughly waxed I can tell you. But that was in the days before we had a Health Week." Then followed a triumphant tour of the State. Schools and public lecture halls were used, and there were some rare goings-on. The titbit of the evening was always the recording on a wax cylinder of the speech of the presiding Mayor or other civic dignitory, which was immediately played back to him, to the always obvious delight of the audience. In the sugar mills of the North they had the inspiration to record the kanaka lingo, and induced one man to sing one of the island ditties in his own language. When the song was played back to him consternation, fear, wonder, and delight were all registered in turn on his countenance. And so this triumph tour progressed. Some very interesting records were made of the McAdoo Singers at the Theatre Royal. Mr. Jackson also made it a practice to secure records of speeches by almost all the Queensland Governors of the period. These were preserved for some years for presentation to the Royal Society, but recent inquiries as to their whereabouts reveal that they have been lost. AN HISTORIC EVENT. One particularly interesting event in this period was the unusual demonstration at the annual conference of the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science in 1895. A newspaper of the time describes the events at the conclusion of the conference this way:— Towards the close of the conversazione two interesting records were taken on a phonograph, of which Mr. A. G. Jackson had control. The first to speak into the instrument was his Excellency the Governor. Sir Henry Norman said: "Gentlemen, you have given this entertainment in honour of the meeting of the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science. I heartily congratulate you on the success which has attended your efforts, and I think, on behalf of this great assemblage, I may venture to thank you most sincerely for the enjoyment and instruction and entertainment we have received." (Applause.) Mr. Brunton Stephens next recited into the phonograph the following verse, which he had composed for the occasion:— God said, Let there be light, They but fulfil, With banded aim, his first recorded will, Who pass, obedient to the prime command, The torch of science on from hand to hand. Subsequently many people listened to the records, that of the Governor's speech being particularly clear and distinct. What an interesting relic would be the record of Mr. Brunton Stephens reciting his lines, which, by the way, must be a stranger in most of the anthologies of Australian verse. That record, however, has gone the way of it fellows. Mr. Jackson said that when he was travelling by steamer he had great troubles, especially in the tropics, in preserving these wax cylinders. Once placed in the vicinity of the engine room or a funnel of a steamer they were reduced to mere grease. More than once this fate befell a cherished wax record of a prominent singer. These cylinders, made of beeswax, were remarkably durable. Mr. Jackson declares that he could play some of those records 500 times without any appreciable signs of wear and tear. It is more than we can say of the average gramophone record of today. THE CLOCK BUSINESS. But we have lingered too long with Mr. Jackson's famous phonograph. We pass on to what is perhaps the most absorbing of his activities, since it has occupied his almost entire attention for many years. It is his association with the clock business. It was in 1904 that he secured the Australian rights for the Synchronome system in Australia. The first tower clock in Queensland, that in the tower at the South Brisbane City Hall, was erected by Mr. Jackson in this year. He recalls that being a comparatively new man in the city, the civic authorities were inclined to distrust his workmanship and would not pay him a penny until six months after the installation. Clock installations in all the capital cities of Australia and New Zealand kept him busy for some years. The culminating point in this work was his design and construction of the City Hall clock. UNCANNY CONTROL. There are a number of features about the control of this clock which deserve special mention in this brief summary of Mr. Jackson's life and work. In the construction of it there are many astonishing features. But perhaps the most interesting of them all is a mere afterthought. When the clock was first started Mr. Jackson was worried by the people who rushed to his office to inform him that the minute hand on one dial of the clock was not in conformity with the others. The inventive brains of Mr. Jackson and his son, Mr. A. A. Jackson, did not idle long on the problem. Today if the hands of the City Hall clock do not correspond, Mr. Jackson, sitting at his office desk will know about it before the hour is out. By pressing a button he can hear the master clock ticking. Every hour, still sitting at his desk, he can check the City Hall clock with the Standard Eastern time at the Observatory. It is never allowed to vary more than two seconds. He can take up a telephone receiver and listen to the clock striking the hour. Every half minute a light flashes in Mr. Jackson's office. That tells him that the hands are in unison and that the clock is working satisfactorily. All this information and a great deal more besides, Mr. Jackson gleans from a small indicator-board installed in his office. His method of checking the clock at each hour is especially ingenious. In this indicator board, which is pictured on this page, we see the light on the left (A), the telephone receiver on the right (B). In the centre of the board is a little black button (C). By taking up the telephone receiver Mr. Jackson can hear the City Hall clock strike the first note of the hour (incidentally it is the first stroke which denotes the end of one hour and the beginning of the next). The little button when pressed connects the light with the standard eastern time at the Observatory. Thus the strike of the City Hall clock can be checked with the observatory time at any minute. The City Hall clock is never allowed to vary more than two seconds with this standard time. But that is not all that this indicator board tells Mr. Jackson. Above these three little appliances will be seen a series of shutters. Each shutter is connected with the public synchronome clocks in the city. At each hour the shutters drop. If they do not drop Mr. Jackson knows that something is amiss; moreover he knows at a glance which clock has gone astray. Sometimes these shutters all fall together like drilled soldiers in the one second. This indicates that the synchronisation throughout the series of clock faces is perfect. When engineers from all parts of Australia visited Brisbane recently for the engineering conference they expressed amazement at this device, and declared that in no other city in the Commonwealth was such a close check kept on public time pieces. Another great scientific curiosity inspected with the greatest admiration by the visiting engineers was Mr. Jackson's world clock. This clever device, which even some of the engineers found difficulty in understanding fully, makes it possible for one to tell at a glance the time in any part of the world, at any minute of the day. Mr. Jackson is most fascinating when one entices him to talk on his pet subject — time keeping. He will talk for hours about the City Hall clock. But let him digress on the subject of accurate time keeping and he will unfold a wondrous tale of scientific accuracies. He will show you a clock in his office which will run for a whole year without deviating more than 20 seconds from strictly accurate time. But when you gasp at that achievement he will tell of the clock he saw in the Woolwich Observatory kept in a specially constructed room where the temperature is kept constant, and where the pendulum actually swings in a vacuum. That clock does not deviate more than one hundredth of a second in a year. That to Mr. Jackson's mind is a really good clock. The natural aptitude which Mr. Jackson displays in his work lives again in his son, Mr. A. A. Jackson pictured on this page. It is he who attends the City Hall clock nowadays and sees that it retains the highest mechanical efficiency possible under the circum- (Start Photo Caption) Inset below: Mr. A. G. Jackson himself — 70 years old — still hale and hearty. (End Photo Caption) The time has come, the Walrus said, To write of synchronomic sums, Of Town Hall clocks and phonographs And lamps and pendulums. (With abject apologies to Lewis Carroll.) ON this page you may read of many things, not necessarily of shoes and ships and sealing wax, or even of cabbages and kings but of many interesting experiences of a man who has virtually seen the growth and development of modern science with his own eyes, and who played no small part in that development. He spoke over the first telephone ever brought to England. He saw the first incandescent electric lamp lit publicly in Manchester in 1882. He operated the first X-ray plant in Queensland for the medical profession. He was the first man to show Queensland people the wonders of the Edison phonograph, the forerunner of the modern gramophone. He built the first open air night lighting plant in Queensland. He is the pioneer of accurate and modern timekeeping in Australia and introduced the system of synchronome clocks into Australia and New Zealand. He built the first tower clock in Queensland in 1904. As the culminating point in his life work he designed and built our much prized City Hall clock — a modern masterpiece in time keeping. He is Mr. A. G. Jackson, of the famous Clock House in Elizabeth Street, Brisbane. (Start Photo Caption) Mr. A. A. Jackson, like Father like Son — (End Photo Caption)[3]

1935 08 27 - Brief Obituary[edit]

Brief obituary for Alfred George Jackson

DESIGNED CITY HALL CLOCK. Death of Mr. A. G. Jackson. WYNNUM, August 27. The death has occurred of Mr. A. G. Jackson, of Ashton Street, Wynnum, and of Clark House, Elizabeth Street, Brisbane, at the age of 72 years. Mr. Jackson, who was born in Manchester, was educated at the Manchester Grammar School, Owen's College and the Manchester University. He commenced work with Levensteins Ltd., the largest dye works in Manchester, and while there took a course at the London University, where he won a gold medal for dye research work. He also carried out experimental work on lamps. He came to Australia early in 1887 and after a short stay in Sydney moved to Charters Towers, where in 1887 he undertook his first personal installation of electric light in Australia, and one of the first installations in Queensland. In 1890 he took up business in Queensland with the firm of Barton and White. Mr. Jackson's life was full of incident, particularly in the way of science. He spoke on the first telephone ever brought to England. He saw the first incandescent, electric lamp lit publicly in Manchester in 1882. He operated the first X-ray plant in Queensland for the medical profession. He was the first man to show Queensland people the wonders of the Edison phonograph. He built the first open air night lighting plant in Queensland, was the pioneer of accurate and modern timekeeping in Australia and introduced the system of synchronome clocks into Australia and New Zealand. He built the first clock tower in Queensland in 1904, and as a culminating point in his life work designed and built the City Hall clock for Brisbane. KEEN SPORTSMAN. In his younger days Mr. Jackson took a keen interest in sport. He played lacrosse in England with Manchester County and for England on several occasions, once against America. When he came to Australia he played for both New South Wales and Queensland in intercolonial times. Later on he was a life member of both the Wynnum and Balmoral Bowling Clubs, also a member of the South Brisbane Club. In his business sphere he was a member of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, London, an associate member of the Institution of Engineers of Australia, a member of the Royal Society and the American Electro Chemical Society, a councillor of the Chamber of Manufacturers. He was also a member of the Masonic Club, the R.A.C.Q., the Royal Society of St. George. Mr. Jackson was a member of the Church of England and of the Wynnum North Progress Association. For some two years Mr. Jackson had not enjoyed the best of health, but the illness which resulted in his death on Sunday overtook him about a week ago.[4]

1935 08 28 - Brief Obituary[edit]

Brief obituary for Alfred George Jackson

OBITUARY. Mr. A. G. Jackson.— The designer and builder of the City Hall clock, Mr. Alfred George Jackson, died at his home in Ashton Street, Wynnum, on Sunday morning, at the age of 71 years. Mr. Jackson was born in Manchester, and was educated at the Manchester Grammar School and Owen's College, in the same city. He came to Australia in 1887, and first resided in Sydney. Several years later he came to Queensland. On Christmas Day, 1890 he married Miss Elizabeth Hart. He was one of the pioneers of the electrical trade in Queensland. In his early days, Mr. Jackson was a noted lacrosse player. He played for England against America in 1885, and after his arrival in Australia he played for New South Wales and Queensland. He was a life member of the Wynnum and Balmoral bowling clubs, and was a member of the Brisbane Masonic Club. Deceased was a councillor of the Queensland Chamber of Manufacturers, and a member of the Institution of Engineers (London), associate member of the Australian Institute of Engineers, American Electro Chemical Society, Royal Society of Queensland, Royal Society of St. George. He is survived by his widow, and one son, Mr. Arthur A. Jackson, Wynnum. M[5]

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Jackson appears in list of electors for Charters Towers

SUPPLEMENTARY ANNUAL ELECTORAL LIST. LIST of persons appearing to be qualified to vote at the Election of Members of the Legislative Assembly in the year 1887-8 for the Electoral District of Kennedy, within the division of Charters Towers. Dated this Eighth day of October, A.D. 1887. Objections to names on this List must be sent to the Electoral Registrar at Char-ters Towers, and to the persons objected to not later than the Twenty-fifth day of October, 1887. FRED. P. PARKINSON, Electoral Registrar.

  • Christian Name and Surname. Residence. Qualification. Situation of property in respect of which qualification arises.
  • Jackson, Alfred George; Charters Towers; Residence; Blank[6]

Jackson granted a homestead in Charters Towers

Warden's Court. YESTERDAY. (Before the Warden). G.F. HOMESTEADS. (On Adjournment.) . . . 765. Alfred George Jackson, 5a, at foot of the Northern Slope; approved of subject to existing rights and survey of roads.[7]

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1892 01[edit]

Alfred George Jackson is declared insolvent in forma pauperis

Insolvency. In Chambers on Wednesday afternoon, before Mr. Justice Real, Henry Theo. Kreibke, of Mitchell, storekeeper, and George Brownlee, of Sandgate, blacksmith, were adjudicated insolvent. The following were adjudicated insolvent in forma pauperis:— Charles Andrew Sweedman, of Brisbane, mariner; George Watson, of South Brisbane, labourer; William Daniel Cosshman, of Brisbane, commission agent; Walter Bertrand, of Brisbane, draftsman; Alfred George Jackson, of Brisbane, electrician; and Catherine Wilhelmina Walter, of Brisbane, a married woman living under a protection order. In all the above cases the first meetings were fixed for the 28th instant.[8]

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Jackson attends AGM of the Brisbane Lacrosse Club and is appointed vicecaptain

Lacrosse. The adjourned annual general meeting of the Brisbane Lacrosse Club was held last night at Lennon's Hotel. There was a good attendance. Mr. Ball reported that the club would be able to put a team in the field every Saturday during the season. The election of officers for 1892 resulted as follows:— President, Hon. T. Macdonald-Paterson, M.L.C.; vicepresidents, Messrs. J. A. Hayes, Geo. Markwell, F. A. McMullen, and Dr. Griffin; secretary, J. F. Maxwell; treasurer, R. W. Ball; captain, S. H. Adams; vicecaptain, A. G. Jackson; committee, Messrs. G. J. Grice, G. R. Ryder, S. Maxwell, and J. Hiron; union delegates (ordinary), Messrs. J. Maxwell and Adams, (special) A. G. Jackson and Ball. The captain, Mr. Adams, addressed the meeting, urging the members to take an individual interest in the club and the game. Arrangements were then made for the club's representation in the combined match to be played on Saturday next.[9]

1892 07[edit]

Detailed report of a Lacrosse game in which Jackson played for Brisbanes

SPORTING. . . . LACROSSE. Brisbanes v. Toowongs (Championship Flag Contest).— The above match was played in the Queen's Park on Saturday last. The following were the teams and their respective positions:— Brisbanes: S. H. Adams (captain), goal; A. G. Jackson, point; R. W. Bale, cover point; J. F. Maxwell, third man; F. Trundle, right defence; J. Hiron, left defence; E. Hewitt, centre; H. Sagar, right attack; G. I. Grice, left attack; T. P. Strickland, third man; S. J. Maxwell, second home; W. Maxwell, home. Toowongs: N. Benson, goal; M. Stanley (captain), point; — Gregory, cover point; T. Stanley, third man; H. Craig, right defence ; W. Craig, left defence; E. Stanley, centre: — Elcock, right attack; R. Benson, left attack; — Townley, third man; E. H. Macartney, second home; T. Neilson, home. The Toowong captain winning the toss chose to defend the goal at the river end. Play commenced at 3.30, the ball being faced off in the usual manner by the centres of the respective clubs. Play was for some time concentrated in the Brisbane's quarters, where some good play was shown by Macartney, Neilson, and Townley, who tried hard to score, but failed, owing to the stubborn defence of Adams, Jackson, Bale, and J. Maxwell. Macartney, from a pass by Neilson, shot at goal, but was well stopped by Adams, who, with a long throw, sent the ball well up the field. Sagar procured, and passed well up into the Toowong quarters, where some smart passing and dodgy play was shown by the Brisbane attacks, Strickland and S. Maxwell being most conspicuous. Strickland picked up smartly and passed to Sagar, who in turn passed to W. Maxwell, who with a smart shot sent the ball between the post, this being the first ball for the Brisbanes. The ball again set in motion, but soon a heavy shower fell, and the teams returned for a few minutes. But as the men were thoroughly soaked, it was thought advisable to proceed with the match. Some very fast play now ensued, the Toowong men rallying, Benson, Gregory, Craigs (2), and Elcock doing good work. E. Stanley from a scrimmage picked up and sent the ball down to Neilson, who with a smart shot sent the ball between the posts, making things equal. Half-time was piped, and the usual spell of ten minutes was indulged in. Play was again resumed, the ball being sent well up in Toowong quarters, where Strickland (Brisbanes) and T. Stanley (Toowongs) were doing excellent work. Strickland picked up and passed to W. Maxwell, who sent the rubber again through the posts, scoring second goal for the Brisbanes. The Toowongs were now on their mettle, rallying and working hard to avert defeat. Give and take play followed, and Strickland passing to S. Maxwell, the latter with a neat shot sent the rubber through the posts, this making the third goal for the Brisbanes. Some good centre play was shown, and Neilson shot at goal but was well stopped by Jackson (goal). Townley passed to Macartney, who shot at goal but failed to score, owing to the excellent goal-keeping of Jackson, who had taken Adams's place, Time was called with the score standing: Brisbanes, 3 goals; Toowongs, 1 goal. The Brisbanes are thus the winners of the first round for the championship flags. Both teams played an excellent game; in fact it was the best game of laorosse ever played here, not-withstanding the sloppy nature of the ground. Spills were very frequent. Messrs. E. H. Decker (referee), Good, and Stoops as goal umpires gave entire satisfaction.[10]

1892 08[edit]

Jackson appointed to the Queensland Lacrosse team to play NSW

Lacrosse. A meeting of the Lacrosse Union Committee was held last night at Lennon's Hotel. The Selection Committee handed in the following names of the Queensland team, subject, however, to alteration if considered advisable:— A. G. Jackson, E. H. Macartney, J. P. Strick-land, E. H. Decker, Wm. Maxwell, E. W. Stanley, T. Neilson, J. F. Chalk, M. Stanley, Talbot Stanley, W. J. Ewart, and T. J. Brown. Mr. Montague Stanley was unanimously elected captain of the Queensland team. The N.S.W. team will probably arrive by the Arawatta on the 19th instant.[11]

1892 09[edit]

Jackson's insolvency is concluded

Supreme Court. An application was made to his Honour Sir S. W. Griffith, C.J., yesterday morning in the Insolvency Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, for a certificate of discharge to be issued to Alfred George Jackson, of Brisbane, electrician. Mr. Fox (Messrs. Unmack and Fox), who ap-peared for the insolvent, applied under section 167 subsection 1 of the Insolvency Act. His Honour granted the certificate.[12]

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1894[edit]

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Jackson advertising for work under business name Jackson and Harriss

ELECTRIC and BRASSFINISHING WORK wanted.. Dentists' Tools and Scientific Instruments repaired and made to order. Jackson and Harriss, Adelaide street, near George-street.[13]

1894 03[edit]

See following - actual test of Jackson's fire alarm fuse

Fire Alarms. Telegraph Chambers. Successful Tests Yesterday. A hosereel and steamer, well horsed and manned by the smart men of the Brisbane Fire Brigade, cannot pass through the main thoroughfares of the city, when people are about, without causing a good deal of commotion. This was proved to be the case yesterday afternoon, and when a detachment of firefighters in "full fig" dashed up to the main entrance of the Telegraph Chambers shortly before 5 o'clock there was much excitement in Queen street, and a crowd quiokly gathered. The reassuring information was, however, soon disseminated that the building was not again in the hands of the fire fiend, and that the presence of the firemen was due only to a test that was being made of a fire alarm system installed in the Elizabeth street block by Messrs. Trackson Bros, electrical engineers. At the hour above mentioned a small party of city gentlemen assembled in the building at the invitation of the chairman of directors of the Telegraph Newspaper Company (Mr. George Cowlishaw). Among those present were aldermen from the Brisbane and South Brisbane councils, the town clerk (Mr. W. H. G. Marshall), and the superintendent of the Brisbane Fire Brigade, and Mr. T. Dickinson, engineer, of the Hydraulic Power Company, of Melbourne and Sydney, and several leading citizens. The men at the fire brigade station, it may be explained, knew that fire alarms were being placed in the building, but they did not know that a test of them was to be made yesterday. Much less did they know the time their presence would be summoned. The first test was made in the machine room, in the basement, where Superintendent Hinton applied a match to one of the alarms. From the time the alarm acted, which it did quickly, until a fully equipped horse reel was standing at the Queen street entrance only 2 minutes 20 seconds elapsed. Soon afterwards the steamer rolled round Grimes and Petty's corner, with every evidence of readiness for action, and it drew up near the reel only 10 seconds later. A few seconds later a length of hose was laid along the corridor of the Queen street block under the direction of Mr. Moorman (assistant superintendent), who only then learned the nature of the alarm. Good as this performance was, it was eclipsed when a second alarm, from the reporter's room, was given about half an hour afterwards. The reel this time arrived at the main entrance in 1 minute 52 seconds, and the steamer in 2 minutes 10 seconds. The latter, however, journeyed by way of George street, and was delayed en route by traffic. Some time afterwards a third alarm was unwittingly given, and the reel then made its appearance in even quicker time than on the two previous occasions.[14]

Jackson states that he developed an optimum fire alarm fuse while employed by Barton and White

Fire Alarms. To the Editor.— Sir,— I was pleased to read in your tonight's issue of the successful trial of your fire alarms, as whilst in the employ of Messrs. Barton and White, I developed this system to its present efficiency, and was the inventor of the fuse as now used in the Parliamentary Buildings and Government Printing Offices, as well as by yourselves. The efficiency of a fire alarm fuse consists in the rapidity with which it can take up the amount of heat necessary to raise it to the temperature at which it ought to act, and to its certainty of action at that temperature. After exhaustive trials I found the form of fuse as you have now adopted to be far and away the best for speed and certainty of action, and I feel sure if merchants knew there was a system on which they could rely, it would be more generally adopted, and protection from great damage by fire would be the result, on account of the rapid warning to the fire station, enabling the engines to arrive at the fire when their services are the most valuable, as shown by your tests today — Yours, &c., Alfred G. Jackson. March 9.[15]

1894 04[edit]
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Jackson holds senior position "Worshipful Master" in a Masonic affiliate

Protestant Alliance. Marquis of Downshire Lodge, No. 5.— Fortnightly meeting held in the Protestant Hall, Ann street, on Tuesday night, Bro. A. G. Jackson, W.M., in the chair. There was a fair attendance. Medical certificate and committee's report on a candidate were received, and he was duly initiated into the order. Bro. Lewens, from Sydney, and Bro. Huxham, from Taringa, were entertained as visitors. A hearty vote of thanks accorded. Auditors' report was read and received. Discussion on good and welfare, during which committee's. report re social to be held in the Protestant Hall on Tuesday, 31st instant, was received. Meeting closed at 10.20 p.m. Receipts £9 10s.[16]

1894 08[edit]

Jackson attends as chair a meeting of a Masonic affiliate

Protestant Alliance. Marquis of Downshire.— The usual fortnightly meeting of this lodge was held last evening at the Protestant Hall, Bro. A. G. Jackson, W.M., in the chair. The auditors' quarterly report and balance-sheet was received and adopted. One new member was initiated. Lodge dues received. £8 13s. [17]

1894 09[edit]

As previous

Protestant Alliance. Marquis of Downshire Lodge, No. 5.— Fortnightly meeting was held in the Protestant Hall, Ann street, on Tuesday night, Bro. A. G. Jackson in the chair. There was a good attendance. A hearty vote of welcome was accorded to Bro. Sammells as a visitor. During discussion on good and welfare of the order several members spoke re social, to be held next month. Receipts of the evening, £9 18s. Lodge closed at 9.45 p.m.[18]

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1895[edit]

1895 01[edit]

Jackson demonstrates phongraphic recording to the delight of the audience at the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science

THE SCIENCE CONGRESS. CONVERSAZIONE LAST EVENING. A BRILLIANT GATHERING. The conversazione held in the Centennial Hall in the evening in honour of the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science, and under the auspices of the members of the medical profession, the Royal Society, and the Royal Geographical Society, was in every sense a brilliant success. The large hall was thronged by a distinguished and fashionable attendance (including his Excellency and Lady Norman and party), who manifested a deep interest in the instruments and products of science exhibited in the various sections. The guests were received at the door by Dr. Little on behalf of the medical profession, Mr. R. L. Jack as representing the Royal Society, and Mr. J. P. Thomson, as representative of the Royal Geographical Society. In this connection it may be explained that Dr. Taylor, the recently appointed president of the Royal Society, was to have acted for that body, but waived his claim to do so in consideration of the fact that the work of organising the gathering, as far as his sooiely was concerned, had devolved upon Mr. Jack. The guests commenced to arrive shortly before 8 o'clock, and were at once ushered into the hall, which had been so arranged that the representatives of the various sciences could be the more conveniently viewed. The exhibits were placed on tables along each side of the building, and at each of those were one or two gentlemen interested, who vied with each other in explaining or demonstrating the many wonders to be shown. The end of the hall was almost wholly occupied by the lantern screen, upon which numerous interesting pictures were thrown and explained during the evening. Down the centre seats had been arranged, but these could not be conveniently used owing to the large attendance, which was estimated to number between 600 and 700. However, the gallery and the veranda at the side of the hall furnished pleasant retreats, and both these places were largely availed of. In the gallery also was stationed the Headquarters String Band under Herr Larsen, which discoursed music at appointed intervals. Each of the sections, of course, received a large share of attention at the hands of the guests, but the intense and continuous interest manifested at the tables where Bacteriology and Physiology were represented was particularly noticeable. The microscopic demonstrations there to be witnessed proved most fascinating, notwithstanding that the heat from the various lamps added somewhat to the already uncomfortably high temperature of the hall. The lantern exhibitions included sixteen views of Brisbane by Dr. Thomson illustrative of the growth of the city, results obtained by Mr. H. C.Russell in his investigations into the star depths, and representations of a great variety of microbes shown by Mr. C. J. Pound. Explanations of the various transparencies were given by the gentlemen named, and were attentively listened to. The exhibition of Geissler tubes was not a success owing to an unfortunate accident by which the electric current was diverted. During the evening Mrs. Gilbert Wilson sang "False and True," and Blumenthal's "Venetian Boat Song." Mr. E. W. Stanley contributed "My Queen," and Mr. D. B. McSwaine, "I would I were a King." The only instrumental item was a solo by Dr. W. S. Byrne — three dances from "Henry VIII." Dr. Byrne also acted as accompanist. The musical contributions added largely to the enjoyment of the evening. Perhaps one of the most interesting features of the proceedings was the taking of two phonographic records by Mr. A. G. Jackson. The first of these was a short speech by the Governor who, speaking into the receiver said, "Gentlemen,— You have given this entertainment in honour of the meeting of the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science. I heartily congratulate you on the success of you efforts, and I think on behalf of this great assembly I may venture to thank you most sincerely for the enjoyment and instruction, and entertainment which we have received." (Applause.) Mr. J. Brunton Stephens then spoke the following lines into the instrument:— "God said, Let there be light. They but fulfil With banded aim His first recorded will, Who pass, obedient to the prime command, The torch of Science on from hand to hand." The instrument for the remainder of the evening was besieged by ladies and gentlemen anxious to hear the voices reproduced. Refreshments were served out during the evening, the catering being under the management of Mr. Jean De Raeve. It is impossible to particularise the numerous exhibits which formed each sectional collection. All were particularly interesting, and in some instances had never before been shown in Brisbane. The first table was labelled "Electricity." On it were specimens of cable of different weight, transmitting and receiving instruments, and other apparatus such as the Electric Telegraph Department might be expected to supply. Perhaps the most interesting exhibit was a piece of wornout cable, lifted from the vicinity of Woody Island, after fifteen years' immersion. Attached to it was a growth of stone, which had formed all round the cable. At an adjoining table an electric fan and a model electric (overhead) tramway were shown. Entomology was exceedingly well represented by specimens furnished by Dr. Lauterer, Dr. Lucas, Mr. R. H. Relton, and Mr. Illidge. Mrs. Coxen had also a case of shells and coral. Dr. Lauterer's contributions were principally poisonous insects, reptiles, and spiders. Mr. Relton had no less than sixtynine species of water beetles, while Mr. Illidge showed a oase of beautiful timber-moths which, owing to the fact that they have to be hatched by the collector, are very rare. Dr. Lucas's cases contained for the most part butterflies, three cases being Australian and one African, the latter obtained by Mr. H. M. Stanley when at Mombassa. Included in the first named is an entirely new species caught by the doctor a few nights ago, and named by him Atkinsonia stigmoderoides. The peculiarity of the inseot is that it is imitative, in that, it draws itself into beetle form for safety. Adjoining was a table monopolised by inte-resting exhibits furnished largely by Mr. F. M. Bailey. Among these were books ranging in dato from 1686 up to the present time and showing the progress made in plant drawing and means of illustration. There was also on the table a section of nodule from the bunya pine — an excrescence which grows in the bark. This had been polished, and the beautiful marking of the timber was universally admired. Mr. Clement L. Wragge had in hand the Meteorological Section. His exhibits included the Stevenson thermometer screen with dry and wet bulbs, maximum and minimum thermometers, solar maximum thermometer in vacuo, thermograph, barograph, and a standard rain gauge capable of holding about 30in. of rain. Geography was represented chiefly by instruments from the Survey Office used in connection with trigonometrical survey. To the Astronomical Section was imparted a special interest by Mr. Russell's lantern exhibition. The exhibits comprised what was spoken of as the finest and most complete collection of photographs in Australia illustrative of the face of the heavens in all weathers. There were also photos. of icebergs, and all were taken by Mr. Russell himself. An orrery showing the solar system and a set of standard measures completed the collection. The Marine Department of Queensland had an interesting little exhibit in the form of the now familiar model of the Pile Light, a model of Cape Bowling-green Light; also a model of a conical buoy in position, and various lamps. The Bacteriological Section was the combined effort of Dr. Love and Mr. C. J. Pound, Government Bacteriologist. Two tables were called into requisition. On one of these were numerous cultivation tubes duly labelled, tubes of tubercle bacilli, diphtheria bacilli, a specimen of a tick-infected part of an animal, tetanus cultivation, an improved Cambridge rocking microtome, and by way of comparison a pirated American version of the instrument. The use to which this machine could be put, as well as the value of the other contents of the table, was explained by Dr. Love, Mr. Pound, and others, and the interest of the collection was thus materially heightened. Alongside was one of Rohrect's latest incubators for cultivation purposes, and the first of the kind imported into Queensland. The second table was utilised more for demonstrative purposes, numerous microscopes revealing to the eye many of the dangers to which human life is subject. There were also shown numerous instruments used by scientists in pathological research. The Physiological Section was no less absorbing. The microscope was here largely requisitioned. The finger, the hair, and other parts of the body were examined, and what were, perhaps, objects still more interesting, were those microscopes under which the circulation of the blood in two frogs (which had been put under the influence of an anaesthetic) was observable. Mr. W. Soutter and Mr. A. Meston alone occupied the ethnological field. Each had an exceedingly valuable collection, Mr. Soutter including among his an autograph letter of Leichhardt, the explorer. The next section was of a varied nature, and labelled "Chemistry." Numerous chemicals were subjected to microscopic influences. There was also a coloured stereoscopic cabinet, a machine for producing electric sparks (some of which were 4in. in length), and Lissajous apparatus for showing harmony in sound by means of combined pendulums. "Geology" was under the charge of Mr. W. H. Rands, who lucidly explained rock sections as he subjected them to the microscope. The walls of the hall were liberally decorated with photographs having reference to the various sections. There were, in addition, photographs lent by the Railway Department, and showing characteristic scenery met with in travelling on the Queensland railways.[19]

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Jackson and Harriss advertising their electric fans and dynamos

Messrs. Jackson and Harriss, of Adelaide-street, are now manufacturing a form of electric fan which should be very useful in the approaching hot weather. It is neat and elegant in appearance, and has some special advantages. By means of a flexible cord attached to the fan at one end, they may be instantly connected with existing light fittings, simply by the insertion of a plug in place of the ordinary lamp globe. The fan may thus be put on an office table or other convenient place, and when not required may be as quickly detached. The fan runs with remarkable steadiness, and the stand having rubber feet, it imparts no vibration to the table. These fan motors are made for either electric light or battery current of any voltage, and where electric light is not obtainable the battery motor for a few shillings a week will produce comfort and coolness. Messrs. Jackson and Harriss have now a quantity of these fan motors in stock, and should do a big business during the hot weather. Their workshops in Adelaide-street are in full swing, and steam power has been employed to enable them to get through the work in hand, consisting of dynamos and motors from one-eighth to five horse-power. Mr. Jackson states that his system of attaching fire alarms to the telephone wires, and so through the Exchange to the chief fire station, is now having an exhaustive trial by the department, and so far has given satisfaction.[20]

1895 10[edit]

Jackson included in supplementary annual electoral lists

Electoral Rolls. SUPPLEMENTARY ANNUAL ELECTORAL LISTS. SUPPLEMENTARY ANNUAL ELECTORAL LISTS of Persons appearing to be qualified to vote at the Election of Members of the Legislative Assembly in the year 1895, for the Electoral districts of BULIMBA and LOGAN, within the South Brisbane Divisions. Objections to Names on this List must be sent to the Electoral Registrar at South Brisbane, and to the persons objected to, not later than the twenty-fifth day of October, 1895. Dated this seventh day of October, 1895. F. J. MARLOW, Electoral Registrar. ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF BULIMBA (WITHIN THE SOUTH BRISBANE DIVISION).

  • Christian Name and Surname: Jackson, Alfred George
  • Age: 31
  • Place of Abode: Gotha street, twelfth house on left from Wickham street
  • Occupation: Electrician
  • Particulars of Qualification: Residence
  • Date when Claim Received by Electoral Registrar: 18 September, 1895
  • Polling District: blank[21]
1895 11[edit]

Jackson entertains the firemen of the South Brisbane Fire Brigade with his phonograph

Firemen and Phonograph. At the South Brisbane fire station last evening Messrs. Jaokson and Harriss gave a capital entertainment to the firemen, their wives, and children with a loud-speaking phonograph. Some of the productions were remarkably excellent, notably some records taken in London, every word of which was heard distinctly all over the room. The band selections also were excellent and much appreciated by the firemen. A vote of thanks was proposed by the superintendent and carried amidst applause.[22]

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Jackson demonstrates a phonograph at the Presbyterian Church, Thompson Estate

Entertainment. . . . A series of winter entertainments was begun in the Thompson Estate Presbyterian Church on Friday last, when Mr. A. G. Jackson, electric engineer, exhibited his loud-speaking phonograph, which reproduced nearly thirty records of music which had been played by bands in America, and songs and recitations which had been given in London, Sydney, Brisbane, and elsewhere several years ago. The records were given with a marvellous exactness.[23]

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1897[edit]

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1897 05[edit]

Jackson operates the lantern at a Centennial Hall concert

CENTENNIAL HALL. SATURDAY SHILLING CONCERTS. TONIGHT. TONIGHT. A MONSTER PROGRAMME. THE BEST SHILLING'S WORTH EVER SUBMITTED TO A BRISBANE AUDIENCE. Orchestra: Herr Rosendorff (leader), Italo Benvenuti, Geo. Bloomfield, J. Case, J. Coates, and V. G. Benvenuti, will play "The Festival," "Welcome," "Bersaglieri March." MRS. GILBERT WILSON WILL SING "The Sea of Life" and "Castles in the Air." MR. J. F. COLLIER "Ever Thine" and "Tom Bowling." MISS M. BRANDON "The Prima Donna" and "Come to Me." MR. J. GOOD "A Soldier's Song," and "For the Last Time." MR. D. J. CORRIGAN Will Recite "Phadrig Crohore," MR. J. C. BAIN, Who has been Specially Engaged, will Sing his Latest Successes, and MR. WALTER BENTLEY Will take the Audience on a Trip to Ireland (pictorially and humorously illustrated). Lantern Operators, Messrs. Jackson and Harriss. Accompanist, Mr. V. G. Benvenuti. 1s. To All Parts of Hall. 1s. Doors Open, to prevent the crush, at 7 o'clock. Performance at 8. Carriages 10 o'clock. [24]

As previous

SATURDAY SHILLING CONCERTS. The excellent programme submitted by the promoters of the Saturday Concerts now being given weekly in the Centennial Hall attracted a large audience on Saturday evening. The appreciation with which the various items were received testified to the fact that notwithstanding all the other attractions the concerts supply a want. The vocalists on Saturday were — Mrs. Gilbert Wilson, Mrs. Busby, and Messrs. J. Good and J. F. Collier. Mrs. Wilson sang Schubert's "Who is Sylvia?" and "Robin Adair," the former of which was enthusiastically applauded, necessitating an encore. Mrs. Busby also achieved a good deal of success in her numbers — the old but ever-popular "Ben Bolt" and " Tit-for-Tat." Mr. Good chose two of Jude's compositions, "Plymouth Sound," which is always sure of a good reception when well rendered, and "The Landlord's Daughter," also a pretty number. He was in excellent voice, and gave an admirable interpretation of both. The same may be said of Mr. Collier, who sang, "I watch for thee on starless night" and "Alice, where art thou?" The remainder of the programme was filled by Mr. J. C. Bain, whose comic interludes convulsed the audience. They were entitled, "The Temperance Man" and "Ada's Serenade." By request, Mr. Walter Bentley repeated his pictorially-illustrated "Twenty Minutes of Scotch Humour," concluding with a recital of Burns's poem, "The Cottar's Saturday Night," also illustrated by lantern views. Mr. W. A. Caflisch acted as accompanist throughout, while Messrs. Jackson and Harriss manipulated the lantern. The entertainment proved most enjoyable The fourth concert of the series will be given on Saturday next, when further novelties are promised.[25]

1897 06[edit]

Jackson and Harriss operate the lantern at the Centennial Hall Shilling Concerts

SATURDAY SHILLING CONCERTS. — CENTENNIAL HALL. The Jubilee Programme, To-night, 19th June. LAST NIGHT OF HER MAJESTY'S SIXTY YEARS' REIGN. ONE SHILLING TO ALL PARTS OF THE HALL. NOTE ARTISTS' NAMES!! CONTRAST WITH RIVAL SHOWS!! BEST SHILLING'S WORTH IN THE WORLD. MRS. GILBERT WILSON Will Sing — "Because of Thee," "A Summer Shower," and take part in Duet from "Gondoliers." Mr. C. J. BOTTGER will Sing — " My Dreams," "Something Sweet to Tell," and take part in Duet from "Gondoliers." Mrs. J. CALLAGHAN will Sing — "Alas Those Chimes" and "Forget Not to Forget." Mr. J. F. COLLIER will Sing — "Mary Adeane" and "Like a Soldier Fall." "Mr. J. C. BAIN will Sing — "The Jubilee Scotchman," "Faces," "Mother-in-law," "He'd Never Done Before." Mr. R. KAYE will act as Accompanist. THE CAMBRIAN CHOIR (Stage specially built for 100 Voices) — "I was Tossed by the Winds," "Since First I Saw Your Face," "The Stars that above us are Shining," "Sleep My Darling," and the National Anthem. And as a Special Item in this Great Bill, HER MAJESTY QUEEN VICTORIA'S RECORD REIGN, Pictorial Illustrations of Persons, Incidents, and Places, with Portraits of her Majesty, just received from London, explained by MR. WALTER BENTLEY. Lantern Operators: Messrs. JACKSON and HARRISS, "GOD SAVE THE QUEEN." ONE SHILLING TO ALL PARTS OF HALL. Doors open at 7. Commencing 8.[26]

1897 07[edit]
1897 08[edit]
1897 09[edit]
1897 10[edit]
1897 11[edit]
1897 12[edit]

1898[edit]

1898 01[edit]
1898 02[edit]
1898 03[edit]
1898 04[edit]

Jackson and Harriss provide limelight effects for sale by Qld Blind and Deaf and Dumb Institution at Centennial Hall

QUEENSLAND BLIND AND DEAF AND DUMB INSTITUTION. CENTENNIAL HALL. SALE OF WORK. TOMORROW (WEDNESDAY), at 3 p.m. Opening Ceremony by Lady Lamington. Sale Continued until 10 p.m. THURSDAY from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Come to the Opening, and See the Elephant and Six Blind Men of Hindoostan. RIDES for the CHILDREN on Elephant, Tableaux by Blind and Deaf and Dumb Children, with Limelight Effects, under the superintendence of Messrs. Jackson and Harriss, Adelaide-street; and Various Amusements. Admission for the Whole Term of Sale, 6d. Gifts from Geraldton, Mackay, Roma, Warwick, Toowoomba, &c.[27]

Jackson and Harriss provide limelight effects for Promenade Concert

GRAND CONCERT. PROMENADE CONCERT. Instrumentalists: HEADQUARTERS STRING BAND Will Perform each Evening from 7.30 to 8. Also during the Concert. Herr ROSENDORFF (Violin), Mr. S. JESSOP, Piccolo Solos, Mr. E. J. BOAST, Cornet Solos. With Orchestral Accompaniments. Miss E. OFFER and Miss A. COATES, Piano. VOCALISTS: MISS MILDRED SAUNDERS, Mrs. J. G. McNab Mr.W. H. Longbottom Miss Sturgess Mr. H. Wainwright Miss Norris Mr. W. Kaye Miss Bailey Mr. D. B. McGavin. RECITATIONS, Etc., by Mr. STURGESS. LIVING PICTURES, Under the Direction of Miss Sturgess. With LIMELIGHT EFFECTS By Messrs. Jackson and Harriss. ADMISSION, 1s. G. K. SEABROOK, Secretary.[28]

Jackson appointed a first associate of the Qld Electrical Association at its first annual meeting

QUEENSLAND ELECTRICAL ASSOCIATION. The Queensland Electrical Association held its first annual general meeting last night; there was a full attendance. The following officers were elected:— President, Mr. J. Hesketh; vicepresident, Mr. J. S. Badger; members of council, Messrs. E. C. Barton, R. O. Bourne, and C. H. Caspersonn; hon. secretary and treasurer, Mr. J. P. Power (Post and Telegraph Department, Brisbane); auditors, Messrs. F. Currey and J. H. Durant. The first associates of the association are — Messrs. G. A. Augstein, J. S. Badger, E. C. Barton, G. H. Boundy, R. O. Bourne, J. R. Bradford, C. H. Caspersonn, T. H. Cowl, F. Currey, E. F. Curtin, F. S. Dooner, J. Dorsett, J. H. Durant, J. Hesketh, A. G. Jackson, G. F. Matthews, L. Mirabel, W. Mott, W. Munt, J. D. Murphy, J. Power, E. W. Smith, S. H. Smith, and H. F. Wilkins. The rules are framed to admit of any person engaged in the electrical profession being elected to the society as students, associates, or members. It is hoped that the above roll will be much enlarged before the next meeting. All information regarding the association can be obtained from the hon. secretary.[29]

1898 05[edit]
1898 06[edit]

Jackson and Harriss reappointed as electricians to South Brisbane Fire-Brigade

South Brisbane Fire-Brigade. First Board Meeting. The first regular meeting of the year of the South Brisbane Fire Brigade Board was held at the municipal chambers yesterday afternoon, when there were present: Ald. A. F. Luya (chairman), Ald. J. K. Duncan, and Messrs. W. Yaldwyn, Charles O'Reilly, and A. J. Carter. Accounts to the amount of £169 2s. 6d. were passed for payment. Ald. Duncan and Messrs. O'Reilly and Carter were appointed Finance Committee of the board for the ensuing year. Mr. G. Smith was elected as superintendent, and Mr. Cummings assistant. Mr. John W. Hill was chosen as secretary. The former electricians (Messrs. Jackson and Harriss) were reappointed for the ensuing year. Messrs. Wylie and Poole were elected auditors. This concluded the business.[30]

1898 07[edit]
1898 08[edit]

Alfred George Harriss handles the lantern work at a photography exhibition for Jackson and Harriss

Amateur Photography. Intercolonial Exhibition. Successful Display. The exhibition of photographs which was opened under the auspices of the Queensland Amateur Photographic Society yesterday afternoon is by far the largest and most successful that has yet been seen in Queensland, a fact which is all the more remarkable too, seeing that the whole of the pictures shown are the work of bonafide amateurs. The exhibition is being held in a large vacant warehouse in Adelaide street, opposite the Normal schools, and though the large room is poorly lighted so far as an exhibition of pictures is concerned, it serves very well the purpose of displaying the 230 competitive and the 350 non-competitive pictures. Reviewing the exhibits generally, visitors to the exhibition will be at once struck with the presence amongst competitive exhibits of quite a number of views of New Zealand mountain and lake scenery, which from the very nature of the subjects and the delightful atmospheric effects so generally present in New Zealand scenery seem to enter into an unequal competition with Queensland or Australian views. The general rules and conditions for the competitions provided that no restrictions should be imposed as to date of production, or as to previous exhibition of the pictures and as the competition was quite an open one to all bonafide amateurs, the Wellington Camera Club and the Dunedin Photographic Society have not failed to avail themselves of the opportunity to come in with their pictures. For many reasons it might have been desirable to have had a section of the exhibition for Australian exhibitors, or at least Alpine scenery might have been dealt with as a class quite distinct from bush scenes or ordinary landscape. The bulk of the exhibits consist of what is known as quarter-plate, giving small pictures about 4 inches by 3 inches and half-plate size, giving pictures about 6 inches by 5 inches. The mounting and framing on the whole are good and appropriate. Class I.— Landscape. The judges had a difficult task before them in dealing with the exhibits in Class I., Landscape. The pictures of Queensland and Australian exhibitors were some of them remarkably fine, so that even confined to these the task would be none too easy, but then came the disturbing element above referred to, of the Alpine pictures from New Zealand. It may be safely said that the amateurs who produced the best of the views not Alpine could have produced results quite as good as their New Zealand brother amateurs if they had the opportunity. From a purely picture point of view there might not be much difficulty in awarding the principal prizes to the New Zealand Alpine views, but then arises the question, how far has photographic technique to be considered in such an exhibition as this. Being a "photographic" exhibition it may naturally be inferred that photographic technique should have a preponderating influence with the judges and that one of the principal, if not the chief question for them should be — How far has the competitor succeeded in making photographic arts and methods serve to produce the most pleasing and artistic picture. The class "landscape" is divided into two sections — "A" pictures over half plate and "B" pictures half plate and under. In section "A" there were only about 22 exhibits and about a third of these were sent in by New Zealand exhibitors, but in section B the number of exhibits was much greater, showing that the bulk of the amateurs are workers with the half-plate size or the more humble quarter-plate camera. In section "A" the choice of the judges rested on a New Zealand Alpine scene, by J. Richardson, of the Dunedin Photographic Society. The view is one of "Elfin Bay" and the feature which constitutes the charm to the picture is the delightful rendering of the reflections on the placid surface of the water. The dark mass of foliage and its reflection are very finely rendered from a photographer's point of view, while the distant hills and their reflection are a delicate echo of the other. The scene is one which inspires with feelings of calm and peacefulness. The picture is well balanced and both from a photographic and an artistic point of view deserves, the special attention of the judges. A neighbouring picture by the same amateur — a view of Lake Wakatipu — is spoiled by being badly mounted, while the prominence of a most inartistic foreground, in which appears a solitary figure, are disturbing factors, in the picture, which would have been improved by a liberal trimming down. But there are pictures in this section which, in their own way and from a photographic point of view, hold their own against their New Zealand competitors. Mr Bostock, of Ipswich, has two well executed and pretty pictures. One is "A Selector's Hut" and the other a view on the Brisbane River. Mr E. H. Alder has made a nice picture in a view of Caloundra Head, but the introduction of the figure is questionable. A picture in this section which is attractive rather from a topographic aspect than otherwise — for it cannot lay any claim to artistic or photographic excellence — is the one entitled "The Divers Rest", in which is depicted the burial place of divers who have met their deaths, presumably in the Torres Strait pearl fishery. Mr Moffat's view of a scene on the Brisbane River at Redbank forms a pretty picture and has many points which commend it. In the other section — B — of the landscape class, there is a much wider range of pictures, but still here again the New Zealanders are again to the front with their Alpine scenery. The little picture, No. 28, "An Autumn Evening, Rere Lake", is a very dainty one and the atmosphere is most charmingly indicated and in another little picture beside it, a platinotype print of a view of Mount Earnshaw, the cloud effects are very fine. These two are probably the best among the Alpine views in this section. Mr Bostock has made a very pleasing picture of a view on Lockyer Creek, near the Gatton college. As a photograph the picture, which is an ordinary silver print, approaches perfection, while, from the artist's point of view, the photographer has made about the best possible out of the scene. This picture, with three other pictures to be referred to immediately, should present themselves to the judges for final selection. One of the others is "A Bend of Moggill Creek", by J. J. Campbell. The view is well selected and Mr Campbell has so deftly applied the resources of the photographer, that he has produced a photograph that is well nigh perfect. The detail is clearly yet artistically defined and the only fault, if any, is that the picture is, perhaps, slightly over printed and consequently rather dark. Another of the three is entitled "A Cool Retreat from Summer Heat", being a view on the creek at Spring Bluff, by Mr W. R. Colledge. The subject is one requiring very careful and skilful treatment at the hands of the photographer, who has, however, succeeded in producing a picture full of soft detail and artistic definition. The other picture referred to is by D. Mactaggart, who has succeeded in producing a very pleasing and effective and well balanced picture from a scene on Degilbo Creek. Some of the exhibitors have essayed to give poetic titles to their pictures, but the titles are sometimes difficult to reconcile with the picture. "Tranquillity" looks stormy and "Eventide" looks rather wild and might just us well be "After the Storm" and "Light and Shade" would be just as appropriate to almost any other picture as to the one on which it appears. W. H. Mobsby shows a number of small views taken with hand camera. They are very good on the whole and go to show that the hand camera in the hands of the right person is capable of artistic application. Further notice of the other exhibits will appear tomorrow. During the evening there was an exhibition of competitive lantern slides. The lantern was manipulated by Mr Harriss, of Jackson and Harriss. Notwithstanding the dirty weather the attendance was very good indeed and with improved weather conditions today and tomorrow the exhibition should be a popular one. Tonight an exhibition of X rays will be given, pressure of work having prevented Dr. Love from giving it last night. The showing of competitive lantern slides, which was begun last night, will be continued. School children will be admitted half-price. [31]

Jackson appointed director of Brisbane Industrial Co-operative Society, Limited

Co-operative Society.— The sixth quarterly meeting of the Brisbane Industrial Co-operative Society, Limited, was held on Friday in the Trades Hall, Mr. T. Grisewood (president) in the chair. The report stated that another satisfactory quarter had just been completed. The following directors were elected: Mr. S. Phillips (president), Messrs. W. Bergland, Henry Taylor, A. G. Jackson, T. T. Taylor, and G. W. Potter. Mr. A. McLeod was re-elected auditor. The usual remuneration to secretary and auditors was ordered to be paid. Votes of thanks were passed to the retiring president and directors and to the manager, Mr. W. Marley. [32]

1898 09[edit]

The lantern exhibits by Jackson and Harriss well received at photographic exhibition

Photographic Exhibition. The photographic exhibition closed most successfully on Tuesday by a really capital cinematographe and lantern exhibition. The Queensland Amateur Society are to be congratulated on the success of the exhibition. The society has been largely helped by Mr. Jackson and Mr. Harriss, who have exhibited the competition lantern slides, by Messrs. Voller, Mobsby, Pound, McTaggart, Ferguson (Baker and Rouse), and many others for help in various ways, as well as to Dr. Thomson and Dr. Love, who have given X ray exhibitions.[33]

Jackson and Harriss extend their workshops

Jackson and Harriss. The electrical fittings and plating works of Messrs. Jackson and Harriss, Adelaide-street, have recently been enlarged and extended. A new gas-engine of eight times the power formerly used has been installed, one engine being taken out, shafting, &c., altered, and the new one fixed and running the following day without a hitch, the fitting being executed by the firm. The electrical and electroplating department, under the supervision of Mr. A. G. Jackson, a member of the Society of Chemical Industry, England, is at present, and has been, very busy, especially in nickel-plating, which they make a speciality. Contracts for office and domestic telephones and bells are also in hand, and stocks of electric light material, medical batteries, wires of all kinds, are kept up to date. The charging of storage cells or accumulators, so much used for working spark coils for X-ray work, has been taken in hand, and by the use of automatic cut-off apparatus danger of overcharging is prevented. The fitting and lathe work is under the control of Mr. A. G. Harriss, and this branch comprises the manufacture, by the use of improved plant, of such machinery as biscuit and lolly cutters and rollers, sodawater and spring mattress machines, moulds and cutters for all trades, as well as the turning and fitting for dynamos, motors, and general electrical fittings.[34]

Jackson comments on his experiences with track lighting at meeting of Qld Electrical Association

Lighting Railway Carriages. Queensland Electrical Association. The monthly general meeting of the Queensland Electrical Association was held on the usual date in the Brisbane Tramways Company's lecture room, kindly placed at the disposal of the association by Mr. Badger. Before the business proper of the evening commenced the president referred to the great loss which the electrical world had sustained by the recent accidental death of Dr. John Hopkinson. The secretary then read the following papers received from the Electrical Association of New South Wales, according to an arrangement which provides for the interchange of papers: "The Electric Lighting of Railway Carriages Independently of One Another and of the Charging Station," by Mr. P. B. Elwell, M.I.E.E.: "Some Notes on the Electric Lighting of Bicycle Tracks," by Mr. James O. Callender, M.l.E.E. Electric Lighting of Railway Carriages. In the system described by Mr. Elwell each car carries its own generating machinery, which consists of a dynamo suspended below the body of the car. The dynamo is driven by a link leather belt in connection with a pulley fixed on the nearest axle. Each carriage is independent of its neighbour, and by the employment of storage cells the light is kept going even when the train is at a standstill. By an ingenious arrangement, whereby the belt is made to slip after the train has attained a certain speed, the speed of the dynamo remains fairly constant, and the light produced is even in character. This system has now been in regular use in a Sydney suburban railway carriage for some months with successful results. Mr. Elwell's paper was well received. In the discussion which ensued. Mr. Badger remarked that a somewhat similar method to Mr. Elwell's had been tried in the United States successfully, but had not come into general use, Pintsch gas being apparently preferred there. Mr. Caspersonn said that the system now under review had been on trial in England and elsewhere since the end of 1895, so that it could not be called new. It certainly had passed the experimental stage. It was now used to a greater or less extent by twelve of the great railway companies of Great Britain, and by a number of the continental railways, and as a result of personal investigation by the railway authorities of West Australia, is to be introduced on the lines of that colony. He also quoted figures issued by the Compressed Gas and Electric Light Companies, by which it appeared that the latter would prove the cheaper, and that was certainly his opinion. As showing that the advantages of the electric light for trains in certain circumstances had not escaped the notice of the Railway Commissioner in Queensland, Mr. Caspersonn quoted some remarks made lately at Rockhampton by the deputy commissioner (Mr. Thallon), who said that on railway systems like the Central Railway, where it would not pay to erect gasworks, the electric light would just fit in, and he was much in favour of it. The President agreed with Mr. Bernays in considering it an anomaly that the system described should rely for its success on what was generally regarded as a failing — namely, the slip of a belt. He was also of opinion that previous train lighting systems were condemned more on account of the failure of the accumulators than of the systems themselves. He was in favour of a system such as Parsons's, where a turboelectric generator on the engine supplied the whole train, or like Holmes's system, where again there was only one generating plant. The systems in use on some American lines, where each car had separate accumulators, which were charged at a generating station at one end of the line, had also some advantages. The introduction of some such system into Queensland would be looked forward to with interest. Lighting Bicycle Tracks. Mr. Callender's paper was also well received. In it the author describes the method adopted by him in August, 1897, in lighting the racing track of the Sydney cricket ground. The lamps then used were 2,000-candlepower each, placed 17 feet above the centre of the track, and 29 feet apart. The lamps were arranged with naked inverted arcs and small enamelled iron reflectors, about 4 inches in diameter, fixed about 1½ inch above the arc; the lamps were enclosed in deep shades, thus concentrating the whole light on the track. In the discussion which followed Mr. Hesketh said he was not of the opinion of a previous speaker that such problems as that discussed by Mr. Callender could be met by calculation only. In his opinion Mr. Callender had adopted the only reasonable solution for such a problem. The losses by reflection were more than counterbalanced by the greatly improved diffusion. Mr. A. G. Jackson related his experiences in track lighting by means of incandescent lamps, and agreed with the author that any attempt to arrange a general illumination of the ground cannot be successful for racing purposes. At the conclusion of the discussion several valuable electric testing instruments, the property of the Brisbane Tramways Company and the Post and Telegraph Department, were exhibited. Messrs. Badger and Hesketh briefly explained their construction and uses.[35]

1898 10[edit]
1898 11[edit]
1898 12[edit]

1899[edit]

1899 01[edit]

Jackson delivers a lecture on electrochemical work to a meeting of the Qld Electrical Association, doesn't see the importance of wireless telegraphy

Scientific & Useful. CHEMISTRY AND INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY. A well-attended general meeting of the Queensland Electrical Association was held on the usual date in the Brisbane Tramways Company's office, when an interesting and instructive paper, entitled, "Chemistry, and its Relation to Industrial Electricity," was read by Mr. A. G. Jackson, M.S.C.I. Mr. E. C. Barton occupied the chair. The author remarked that it would be impossible to deal with so extensive a subject as electrochemistry in one evening, and so he would confine his attention chiefly to those phases of the subject which concerned Queensland. Electrochemistry and electrometallurgy being so closely allied, were classed by Mr. Jackson under the one heading, and as an instance of the advance of these sciences he mentioned that over one-half of the power contracted for at the Niagara Falls is to be used for either electrochemical or electrometallurgical work. He described the uses of electricity in the estimation of metals, and illustrated by experiment the electrolytic assay of copper in metals and copper ores, showing the extreme exactness of this method as compared with chemical methods, when due regard is paid to the current and solutions used. He was of opinion that the separation of gold from minute quantities of silver and platinum, or gold parting, as it is generally called, may eventually be carried on in this colony, as in other countries, where absolutely pure gold is obtained from the commercial metal by electrical methods. Amongst other processes likely to be adopted in Queensland, the author mentioned the electrical extraction of lead, silver, and zinc from sulphide ores; and described the Tommasi, Cowper-Coles, and Ashcroft processes for the treatment of ores containing these metals. He specially illustrated the advantages of the use of aluminium, on which to electrically deposit these metals. Calcium carbide, also, which is produced by electrothermal agency, might be produced here if power could be obtained cheaply enough. The combination of the lime with the carbon is brought about by the intense heat of the electric arc. The electrical extraction of copper from ores, and also the refining of copper which is carried on to such an extent in America, England, and the Continent, offers scope for opening up and developing such fields as Chillagoe, where both rich and poor ores are found, and where at the present time great efforts are being made to increase the output of copper. At the Anaconda Electrolytic Refinery, America, no less than 3000 horsepower is used for this work, and 200 tons of copper are turned out daily by their process. From the crude copper about 350,000 oz. of silver and 1500 oz. of gold per month is obtained. The lecturer then described the difference in the working of the Elmore, Dumoulin, and Anaconda processes. The deposition of gold from dilute cyanide solutions by electrolysis offers the most interesting field for work in Queensland, especially at the present time, when many of the deep lodes are showing very poor metal. Just as the output of gold has been increased by the cyanide process, so, if results obtained in Africa can be obtained here, should the introduction of electrodeposition, instead of zinc extraction, of gold from the cyanide solution still further increase the output. The electrical sepation of gold, although tried experimentally without much success in Queensland, has been used for some time in Africa and America to great advantage. The author then described the Cowper-Coles process for the electrical deposition of gold on to plates of aluminium, which process, he said, seems to offer great advantages, as the gold is deposited in a bright metallic state, and can be readily peeled off from the aluminium for smelting. He then illustrated this process with a deposition of gold on to aluminium from a dilute cyanide solution containing 10dwt. of gold to the ton of solution. In the author's opinion, the successful treatment by electrical methods of dilute solutions means the working of poor tailings and slimes now lying as waste heaps, and the working of some of these processes, especially the latter, offers perhaps a solution of such problems as the economical lighting of towns like Gympie, Croydon, &c., by the utilisation of the current generated in the day for electrochemical work. In conclusion, Mr. Jackson remarked that in a mineral country like Queensland electrochemistry and electrometallurgy had far greater claims on our attention than such inventions as wireless telegraphy. He advocated the establishment of a laboratory in connection with the Technical College, combined with a school of mines, so that the study of these subjects might be pursued.[36]

1899 02[edit]

Jackson and Harriss appointed electricians to the South Brisbane Fire Brigade Board

FIRE BRIGADE. South Brisbane. Valuable Annual Report. The annual meeting of the South Brisbane Fire Brigade Board was held in the municipal council chambers yesterday afternoon. There were present: The Mayor (Ald. P. Nott), in the chair, Messrs. A. J. Carter, Saltmarsh, O'Reilly, and Mr. Smith (superintendent). The members of the board expressed their pleasure at meeting their new chairman, and hoped he would have a prosperous year. Included in the correspondence which was read and dealt with was a letter from the Queensland National Bank, granting permission to the board to overdraw their account to the amount of £250. The finance report, which was read and adopted, recommended the payment of accounts amounting to £112 14s. 1d. It was stated that after the accounts had been paid there would be an overdraft of £87. The annual statement showed the receipts for the year amounted to £1,261 9s. 7d., and the expenditure to £1,212 2s. 3d., leaving a credit balance of £115 1s. 7d., including £62 14s. 3d. which stood to the credit of the board at the beginning of the year. The superintendent reported that he had received two calls since the last meeting. The first was received through the exchange for a fire in Thomas street, West End. On arrival it was found that the roof of a four-roomed house was on fire, which was completely destroyed. The lower part of the house received no damage. The second call was received from the North Brisbane brigade for assistance at a fire in Littledike's bedding factory. The whole of a shed was completely destroyed, and the factory much damaged. The superintendent also reported that it would be necessary to sell one of the horses, as it was not suitable for fire brigade works. It was decided to leave the matter of securing a new horse in the hands of the chairman and Mr. Stephens. The report was then adopted. Tenth Annual Report. The secretary's (Mr. J. Hill) tenth annual report for the year 1898 showed that the new board was gazetted on May 28 as follows: A. F. Luya (Mayor of South Brisbane), and Ald. J. K. Duncan, Messrs. A. J. Carter and A. G. Saltmarsh elected by the insurance companies. Messrs. W. Yaldwyn, P.M., and C. O'Reilly, appointed by the Governor-in-Council. Attention was drawn to the delay occurring, not only this, but in the two preceding years, in gazetting the new board. As stated above, this year the board was gazetted on May 28; 1897, May 29; 1896, May 27. This delay was caused by the action of the Underwriters' Association, holding back the election of their representatives upon this board until the election was made for the Brisbane Fire Brigade, such action being at variance with the sixth section of the Fire Brigades Act Amendment Act of 1882, which provides that the election of insurance representatives shall be made "as early as possible in the month of March." The Act further provides that the insurance companies should furnish their returns on or before the last day of February in each year, but frequently returns from some companies are not received until the middle of March, which causes a delay in the election of representatives. I would suggest the insurance companies be asked through the Underwriters' Association to be more prompt in this matter. On June 28 Mr. John W. Hill was appointed as secretary; Mr. George Smith, as superintendent; Mr. Richard Cummings, assistant superintendent; Messrs. Jackson and Harriss, electricians, and Messrs. A. C. Wylie and W. C. Poole, auditors. Twelve regular and twelve financial meetings were held during the year. The Fire Brigades Act provides that the Municipal Council shall annually pay such sum as they may deem necessary, from 2 per cent to 8 per cent, on the total amount of general rates received during the previous year, the Government and insurance companies each to contribute a like amount. For the year under review the Municipal council contributed the sum of £402 1s. 9d. being equal to 3¼ per cent of the general rates, £12,371 18s. 7d., received during the past year, the other contributing parties paying in each a like amount, these amounts, together with miscellaneous receipts, gave the board a revenue of £1,264 9s. 7d., whilst the expenditure for the same period amounted to £1,212 2s. 3d. The year commenced with a credit balance of £62 14s. 3d., and closed with a credit balance of £115 1s. 7d. After making a liberal allowance for wear and tear of plant, appliances, and buildings the assets of the board are £1,292 18s. 3d., whilst the liabilities are nil. Some trouble has occurred through the defective condition of the wires from business premises causing several false alarms. There would not be much harm done in turning out the brigade unexpectedly, but there is a danger that the services of the brigade might be required for a fire whilst attending to a false alarm, after considerable correspondence it was decided that owners of private wires calling out the brigade by a false alarm should be charged the sum of 10s. I would suggest in the interest of all concerned that private wires to the station should be under the direct control of the board's electrician. The question of smoke caps has received some attention, and inquiries were made as to the cost and suitability of different smoke caps and protectors, especially the Vajen Bader Patent Smoke Protectors, but no definite information could be obtained when they had been tested at a fire. I see by the annual report of the Sydney Fire Brigade Board that a Vajen Bader Smoke Protector has been ordered, and I would suggest that after the protector has had a fair trial the superintendent be asked for his opinion upon the same. The board last year imported from Messrs. Merryweather and Sons two of Murphy's combined smoke-driver, spreader, and solid jet nozzle; up to the present time no trial has been given them, and I would suggest that before any further expenditure is incurred some arrangements be made for testing the capabilities of these appliances. The question of street fire alarms has been before you on several occasions, and considerable information has been collected from the Fire Brigade Boards in the neighbouring colonies; also from the Post and Telegraph Department, as to the cost, &c. This department does not seem to realise the fact that the board is a public body formed for the protection of the lives and property of the general public, for in supplying an estimate of the cost of erecting and maintaining lines for street alarms, the cost is the same as would be supplied to a private person or firm, and so long as they take this contracted view it will practically place it beyond the reach of the board to give effect to any comprehensive scheme of street fire alarms. I would here note that the department's estimate of the cost of erecting one line from the station to the corner of Hardgrave road and Ganges street is £74 4s.; in addition to this there would be the cost of instruments and fixing, also the annual rent, calculated at the rate of £5 per mile. I find from a perusal of the annual report of the Fire Brigade Board of Sydney that the expense of erecting and maintaining street fire alarms has become so burdensome that the board intend to approach Parliament for assistance, and if any effective scheme is to be inaugurated in South Brisbane the charges of the Post and Telegraph Department must be considerably reduced or entirely omitted. . . . [37]

1899 03[edit]

Jackson appears to have bought out Harriss from the partnership

LADY'S Bicycle for Sale, cheap, almost new. A. G. Jackson, General Electrical Works, Adelaide street.[38]

Jackson now appears to be trading as "General Electrical Works"

GENERAL Electrical Works, Adelaide street, for electro and nickel Plating. A. G. Jackson, Manager. GENERAL Electrical Works, Adelaide street, for electric bells, telephones, medical coils, and batteries. [39]

Jackson selling his cinematograph

CINEMATOGRAPH For Sale, complete with all accessories. General Electrical Works, Adelaide-street, A. G. Jackson, Manager.[40]

1899 04[edit]

Jackson advertising for electroplating work

ELECTRICAL Works, Adelaide-street.— Steel and Iron Plated with Brass, Nickel, or Copper. Jackson.[41]

Jackson attends meeting of Qld Electrical Association and demonstrates the recently invented Wehnelt electrolytic current interrupter used for both Xray production and wireless telegraphy (in the company of Barton & Hesketh)

THE QUEENSLAND ELECTRICAL ASSOCIATION. A general meeting of the Queensland Electrical Association was held on Wednesday evening in the Technical College, Ann-street, the president occupying the chair. The papers received from the Electrical Association of New South Wales — on "Electric Elevators," by Mr. J. R. Bainton, A.I.E.E., and on "The Rockhampton Electrical Undertaking," by Mr. E. Holcombe Hewlett, M.I.E.E.— were discussed. Mr. Barton, viewing electric elevators from a supply station point of view, said that the initial current required to start the lift at full speed was very large, and this extra load had to be provided for, otherwise the lamps in the same circuit with the elevator would frequently become dim. The economy of power in starting electric elevators was not comparable with that in the hydraulic method. Mr. Bernays said that the cost of the necessary current was too high in Queensland, but that in London the electric elevators were superseding the hydraulic. The cost there was also in favour of the electric lift. He said that as soon as Brisbane was in a position to supply current for elevators at a reasonable figure, electric elevators would be used. The President said that the difference between the maximum and average current necessary for electric elevators was not so great as Mr. Barton asserted, and that wherever hydraulic power could be used, electric power could also be used, and with advantage. Mr. Hewlett's paper, which was in the main descriptive of the crude state of the Rockhampton supply station when taken over by him in 1895, and the methods since adopted by him for remedying the many defects, was then discussed. Mr. Barton said that he could thoroughly sympathise with Mr. Hewlett. The original Act of Parliament regulating the Rockhampton scheme enhanced the difficulties of erection and maintenance; for instance, the overhead system of wiring was permitted along the streets, but when a crossing was met with the wires had to go underground. A.most ridiculous provision. The President referred to the very faulty insulation of the mains, and to the remarkable fact that, with the dynamo disconnected, a current could be obtained from the mains at any time, thus preventing accurate testing. "The mains were virtually a storage battery. It is intended in future to use a leadcovered cable, with paper insulation. He said that Mr. Hewlett stated his case fairly and moderately, and the history of the undertaking was a valuable object-lesson on what to avoid in similar schemes. The Cailho system of simultaneous telegraphy and telephony was then explained by Mr. Hesketh, who said that it was not new except in its application to Queensland, and that he introduced it that evening for educational purposes. It was elegant in theory and successful in practice. He illustrated the system, which is now working excellently between Brisbane and Ipswich and Mount Morgan and Rockhampton, by suitable diagrams. The advantages of the system were a complete metallic circuit for the telephone, and an additional circuit for telegraphic purposes. The essential parts were two differential impedance coils, one at each station, which, when suitably connected, offered the maximum impedance to the telephone currents, and thereby confined them to the metallic circuit; whereas they offered no impedance to the telegraph currents. The terminals of each telephone were so connected in the system that, as regarded the telegraph currents, they were always at the same potential, consequently the telephones were unaffected by the telegraphic signals. This system worked so well between Brisbane and Ipswich that it would be impossible for anyone not an expert, when listening on the telephone, to distinguish whether Morse signals were being transmitted or not. The Mount Morgan and Rockhampton system also worked very well, indeed. Mr. Hesketh replied to several questions, after which Mr. A. G. Jackson exhibited "the Wehnelt electrolytic current interruptor." Mr. Jackson was entirely successful in his demonstration of this wonderful apparatus. The interrupter was of his own manufacture, and used in connection with an induction coil kindly lent by Mr. Carl Zoeller. No condenser was used. A spark 6in. in length was obtained, the brilliant appearance of which might be described as a "flaming sword." Mr. Jackson used the electric light current of from 3 to 5 amperes, and the results obtained were vastly superior to those possible with the ordinary "break." The Wehnelt interruptor consisted of two electrodes of very unequal surface, in an electrolyte of dilute sulphuric acid. It rendered the use of a condenser unnecessary, and the output of a coll was said to be increased, forty to fifty times. As many as 1700 breaks per second had been obtained, measured by the musical note emitted. The cause producing the interruptions was not at present understood. A vote of thanks to Mr. Jackson for his excellent contribution was proposed by the chairman, and carried by acclamation. Mr. Tonks exhibited a directcoupled water motor and dynamo, suitable for lighting a sixteen c.p. lamp or for charging accumulators by the water pressure from the ordinary tap. This exhibit proved of much interest to members.[42]

1899 05[edit]

Jackson advertises for an apprentice

APPRENTICE wanted, Electrical work; premium. A. G. Jackson, A.I.E.E., Adelaide-street.[43]

1899 06[edit]
1899 07[edit]

Jackson contributes to a discussion at the meeting of the Qld Electrical Association on a talk about electrolysis

THE QUEENSLAND ELECTRICAL ASSOCIATION. At the last general meeting of the Queensland Electrical Association, Mr. S. H. Brown, of the Brisbane Tramways Company, read an interesting paper on "Electrolysis." Regarding its history, the author stated that attention was drawn to corrosion of pipes about 1888, this being some time after the first electric system of cars had been inaugurated. The damage was small, and not sufficient to attract much attention, but in 1891, in Boston, where a large and complete electric tramway had been in operation since 1888, the underground cables and waterpipes running parallel with the tramway return circuit were found to be so badly corroded that the matter was brought prominently before the different companies. The corrosion of these underground cables was found to exist in certain spots only, and this was attributed to local action from the acetic acid from the wood conduits in which the cables were drawn; but further investigation traced the cause directly to the return current in the ground from the West End Street Railway, and also at different points where the current left the pipes and cables for a path of less resistance, to the power station. At this time the street railway generators had the positive terminals to the rails and the negative to line. The alarming statements made regarding electrolysis assumed such proportions that it was freely predicted that all gaspipes, waterpipes, and cables, would be completely corroded and useless in two or three years, unless speedy action was taken by tramway companies. Naturally an immediate investigation was made in cities where electric trams were installed to ascertain the condition of pipes. It is needless to state that many pipes were found to be in a bad state of corrosion, much of which could be attributed to stray currents from return circuits of tramways, while in others it was found, after further study of the conditions, to be due to the chemical action of ammonia and sulphate leakage from the gas mains in the earth. In those days the bad bonding of rails and the dependance on the earth and other pipes for the return circuit must certainly have caused much damage. Corrosion depends upon the amount of current, and with it the resistance of the earth and the pressure causing the flow. As regards the minimum voltage required to start electrolysis, Mr. Brown quoted from Professor Jackson, who states that a mere directive force is sufficient to start it, and will be injurious if continued for sufficient time. This will, however, depend on the nature of the soil. The question of voltage is often considered an indication of corrosion, but is only a necessary condition, and not an indication. The resistance of the electrolyte has also to be taken into consideration. The author described the methods of testing and acquiring knowledge of stray currents in and from the ground return. Mr. Brown described several methods for the prevention of electrolysis, and said that probably the method proposed by the engineer of the West End Street Railway has been as successful as any, and was made when it was customary to connect the negative pole of the dynamo to the line and the positive to the ground. In this method the poles of the generators are reversed, thus reducing the danger district to narrower limits, and the pipes and cables are connected to a common ground cable laid for this purpose directly to the negative bus bar. To think that street railway managers are unwilling to tackle the subject, or ignorant regarding this destruction by electrolysis, is a mistake. The extra expense entailed for good bonding is more than repaid by reduced depreciation and cost of energy per car-mile. In years gone by the tramways have been to blame for this trouble, on account of bad bonding, but in later years the return circuit has been improved to such an extent that the author objected to the statement that such is the case now. A discussion followed the reading of the paper, the chief contributors to which were the president and Mr. A. G. Jackson. The proceedings terminated with a hearty vote of thanks to Mr. Brown, proposed by the president.[44]

Jackson advertises for a skilled electroplater and polisher

ELECTROPLATER and Polisher wanted, must be good workman. A. G. Jackson, Adelaide-street, near George-street.[45]

Jackson again included in supplementary annual electoral lists

ELECTORAL LISTS. SPECIAL JULY ELECTORAL LISTS. SPECIAL (JULY) LIST of Persons appearing to be qualified to Vote at the Election of Members of the Legislative Assembly in the year 1899 for the Electoral District of BRISBANE SOUTH. Objections to names on this List must be sent to the Electoral Registrar at Brisbane South and to the Persons objected to not later than the 18th day of July, 1899. Dated this Seventh day of July, 1899. W. M. HARRIS Electoral Registrar.

  • Christian Name and Surname: Jackson, Alfred George
  • Age: 30
  • Place of Abode: Hope street, opposite South Brisbane Courthouse
  • Occupation: Electrical Engineer
  • Particulars of Qualification: Residence
  • Date when Claim Received by Electoral Registrar: 4 July, 1899[46]

Jackson demonstrates scientific instruments at the Royal Society of Qld Conversazione alongside Hesketh demonstrating wireless telegraphy

ROYAL SOCIETY OF QUEENSLAND. CONVERSAZIONE AT THE TECHNICAL COLLEGE. The conversazione given by the Royal Society of Queensland on Saturday evening last, in the Technical College rooms, was a brilliant and enjoyable function. The arrangements for the entertainment of the guests of the society were somewhat unique, and went far to show that science is not necessarily dry, nor scientists dull hosts. Few of the many hundreds who accepted the invitation of the society to be present had counted upon such an enjoyable evening — an evening face to face with many of the wonders of Nature, made clear by modern science. Almost every branch of science was represented. The function might well be termed a review of the society's work for the year. So that the scope of the entertainment may be understood, we print the programme, which was carried out in its entirety: A.— Lecturettes, in the Lecture Theatre of the college. Sectional Committee: Dr. John Thomson and Mr. W. J. Byram. (1) Insects and flowers (illustrated with thirty lantern slides), J. Shirley, B.Sc.; (2) glimpses of the microscopical world (illustrated with forty lantern slides), W. J. Byram; (3) colour-vision (indicating the tests for colour-vision in the Queensland Railway Department), Dr. John Thomson; (4) wireless telegraphy (with demonstrations illustrating electric waves and the principles of wireless communication by electricity), Captain J. Hesketh, Government Electrician and officer commanding the Submarine Mining Section, Brisbane Engineers; (5) limelight views, by the Photographic Society. B.— Scientific apparatus, room No. 8 of the college. Sectional Committee: Messrs. J. W. Sutton and A. G. Jackson. (1) Specimens of woodboring marine animals, models of buoys, boats, and lighthouse apparatus, Captain Almond, Portmaster; (2) ancient and modern works on botany, F. M. Bailey, F.L.S., Government Botanist; (3) models of diamonds, New Guinea fishing-kite, and native toys, C. W. de Vis; (4) Union Marine oil engine, H. Knight-Eaton; (5) photographic appliances, C. D. Ferguson; (6) microphonic and other coherers, Captain J. Hesketh; (7) Wehnelt Electrolytic Current Interrupter and Induction Coil, A. G. Jackson; (8) spectroscope, Buytro-refractometer, T. McCall; (9) wax models of cattle, Mount Morgan specimens, Hon. A. Norton; (10) thirty select views, Photographic Society; (11) electrical machine, graphoscope, stereoscope, vacuum tubes, Newton's rings, induction coil, J. W. Sutton; (12) position micrometer, exploring instruments, orrery, rare maps and books, &c., J. P. Thomson; (13) water-motor, driving and ventilating fans, T. Tonks; (14) simplex acetogene, Robinson's hot-air engine, dynamo machine, J. Trackson. C.— Microscopy, room No. 10 of the college. Sectional Committee: Messrs. C. J. Pound, (Government Bacteriologist) and F. Whitteron. Display of twentyfive microscopes, showing — (a) bacteriological, (b) botanical, (c) physiological, and (d) zoological exhibits — the slides being changed every half hour; exhibits by Mr. C. J. Pound — (1) E. M. Nelson's Monochromatic Light Apparatus, illuminating the flagellum of a spirillum; (2) unique specimen of microscopic engraving on glass, "The Lord's Prayer"; (3) Pasteur's chicken cholera microbes in hermetically-sealed pipette; (4) tubercle bacilli (consumption germs), growing on beef jelly; (5) half a cubic inch of dried tubercle bacilli, representing over 100 million million germs; (6) tubercle bacilli, shown under the microscope; (7) bacterium prodigiosum (blood rain), growing on potatoes; (8) microspecimens, prepared over fifty years ago; (9) microspecimens, prepared specially for this conversazione; (10) the Cambridge Rocking Microtome (in operation); (11) cattle ticks — the complete life history from the egg to the fully-mature tick. D.— Entomology, room No. 7 of the college. Sectional Committee: Messrs. R. H. Relton and R. Illidge. (1) Six cases moths, beetles, butterflies, R. Illidge; (2) nine cases moths, beetles, butterflies, R. H. Relton; (3) eight cases moths and butterflies, Dr. T. P. Lucas; (4) boring beetles, A. Stacet. E.— Rontgen rays, room No. 11 of the college. Dr. Wilton Love. F.— Ethnology, room No. 10 of the college. Sectional Committee: Messrs. C. J. Pound and F. Whitteron. In each of the rooms as the visitors thronged through the members of the sectional committee explained the chief items under their care, and the most abstruse scientific subjects were made plain and popularised; even Mr. Pound's " monochromatic light apparatus, illuminating the flagellum of a spirillum" being regarded by many before the evening was over as quite an intimate circumstance in the world of discovery. It is due to the guests to say that the keenest interest was taken by them in the wonders illustrated. The lecture room was specially popular, and very deep interest was taken in Captain Hesketh's illustrations of the wireless telegraphy. Dr. Thomson's lecture, too, was very popular, and to the majority who crowded the theatre of the college the true meaning of the strange defect of colour-blindness was for the first time fully appreciated, the Hon. Dr. Taylor very kindly submitting himself as a subject under the peculiar lights which place the ordinary perfect vision in the condition of visual imperfection which means colour-blindness. Mr. Shirley's illustrations of insects and flowers, and Mr. Byram's glimpses of the microscopical world, both shown by means of lantern slides, were thoroughly enjoyed. The Royal Society had engaged the services of Signor Truda's string band, and thus good music was enjoyed side by side with her no less beautiful sister, Science. Nor did the hosts forget that there are other parts of the human organisation beside the brain. Refreshments were liberally served in the large hall on the ground floor, and there the guests assembled towards the close of the evening to sip their coffee and discuss spectroscopes and Buytro-refractometers, microphonlc coherers, and the mysteries of bacterium prodigiosum. Altogether the evening was a delightful break in the ordinary round of amusements, and it was impossible to pass, even in a casual way, through the various sections of the display without a feeling that our science workers are keeping abreast of the times, working loyally and well in the interests of our common humanity.[47]

1899 08[edit]

Jackson demonstrates various electrolytic interrupters at the Qld Electrical Association Conversazione

Queensland Electricians. Conversazione on Saturday Night. A conversazione under the auspices of the Queensland Electrical Association was held in the Technical College on Saturday evening last, and was in every way a decided success. Several of the spacious rooms in the building were used for the display of electrical apparatus of various kinds, while the large hall on the ground floor was set apart as a refreshment-room, and two smaller apartments served as cloakrooms for ladies and gentlemen respectively. Captain Hesketh, the Government electrician, who is also president of the Electrical Association, together with other officers of the society, formally received the visitors, and directed them to the rooms where the exhibits were to be seen. On the ground floor was displayed a quantity of tramway apparatus, by an inspection of which the visitors were enabled to fully understand the working of the electric cars on the city tramways. It is said that this was the first occasion on which such an exhibit had been shown for the public benefit. The apparatus referred to was kindly lent by Mr. J. S. Badger, manager of the Brisbane Tramways Company. In one room on the first floor telegraphic and telephonic apparatus of various kinds was exhibited, and the visitors were enlightened as to the manner of working the several instruments by Captain Hesketh, who explained everything in a way so free from technicalities that no person of ordinary intelligence could fail to understand. Among the telegraphic apparatus were samples of Wheatstone's A.B.C. instruments, Wheatstone's automatic instruments, single needle instruments, Morse recording instruments, Morse sounders, and numerous parts and types of apparatus in use during recent years. Among the telephonic apparatus shown, none attracted greater attention than the exhibits of the switchboards and other appliances by means of which a central telephone exchange is worked. The telephonic system is now so widely used that it is not surprising there should be a desire on the part of the public in general to understand how it is worked. No explanation is therefore needed as to why so much curiosity was shown in regard to this particular department of electrical science. There were also to be seen various kinds of microphones and receivers, as well as samples of the numerous accessories which are in general use. Some testing apparatus, both for underground and submarine use, was exhibited and explained by Mr. J. Power, the secretary to the association, who has made a special study of this branch of the science. The testing apparatus included some of Wheatstone's bridges, galvanometers, testing coils, and keys. Samples of telegraph and telephone cables were also shown, and a full explanation regarding them was given by Mr. G. F. Matthews. Pieces of old submarine cables were also exhibited for the purpose of illustrating the manner in which they are attacked and eaten through by insects. An interesting exhibit of railway signalling apparatus was put in by Mr. C. H. Casperson, inspector of railway telegraphs. In the adjoining room was a model tramway driven by a water motor dynamo, which was lent for the occasion by Mr. T. Tonks, of the Brisbane Electrical Company, and was inspected with very much interest. Another room was devoted to the display of electric lighting and sundry apparatus, including a hot wire, recording voltmeter, Hookham electricity meter, Thompson Watt meter, parabolic reflector, rotary convertor, dynamo armature, and repulsion voltmeter. Mr. A. G. Jackson exhibited and explained the Wehnelt, Caldwell, and Swinton adjustable electrolytic current interrupters, an exhibition spectra of metals, and Geissler tubes. Dr. John Thomson, in yet another room, exhibited Rontgen's X-ray apparatus, by means of which he enabled many successive admiring groups to gaze at the bones in the hands and feet of those individuals who were willing to lend themselves for that purpose. When the visitors had been "well filled" with scientific knowledge, they adjourned to the ground floor, where refreshments had been liberally provided. Here — between dainty nibblings at Mr. Eschenhagen's fancy cakes — conversation, mostly having reference to dynamos, induction coils, and the like, was indulged in to the accompaniment of Truda's band. The gathering subsequently dispersed, after having spent a most entertaining and instructive evening. It is hoped that it will be possible to make the Electrical Association's conversazione an annual affair.[48]

1899 09[edit]

Jackson appointed to the council of the Qld Electrical Association

Electrical Association. The second annual general meeting of the Queensland Electrical Association was held on Tuesday, at the Technical College, for the purpose of receiving the report of the council and electing officers for the ensuing year. Letters of apology for unavoidable nonattendance were read from Messrs. R. O. Bourne, C. H. Caspersonn, and J. H. Durant. There was a full attendance of members. Mr. J. Hesketh occupied the chair. The report stated that since the last annual general meeting 10 ordinary general meetings and one special general meeting were held, with an average attendance of 21 members. The society owes its thanks to the following gentlemen for papers contributed, which were read and discussed at these meetings — namely, Messrs. J. Hesketh, C. H. Caspersonn, E. C. Barton, J. H. Durant, W. J. Napier, A. G. Jackson, and S. H. Brown. There were at present 68 members on the roll, including 10 country members. Speaking generally the work of the association has been sucoessful, and reflects credit on its energetic founder, the past president, Mr. J. Hesketh. The election of officers resulted as follows: President, Mr. E. C. Barton; vicepresident, Mr. J. S. Badger; members of council, Messrs. R. O. Bourne, J. Dorsett, and A. G. Jackson; hon. Secretary, Mr. J. Power; auditors, Messrs. E. F. Curtin and J. D. Murphy. The council also includes Mr. J. Hesketh, past president.[49]

1899 10[edit]
1899 11[edit]

Jackson successfully tenders for the electrical maintenance work at Brisbane General Hospital

Brisbane General Hospital. Meeting of Committee. The committee of the Brisbane General Hospital met yesterday at the office of the chairman, Mr. James Stodart, M.L.A., who presided. There were also present Messrs. J. D. Campbell, M.L.A., S. W. Brooks, P. Mallon, H. J. Oxley, and R. Edwards, Dr. Mayne, medical superintendent, and the secretary also attended. The treasurer's report recorded that the overdraft had been reduced from £1,682 14s. 3d. to £349 8s. 5d. during the interval since the last meeting; the receipts having amounted to £2,633 6s. 11d., and the expenditure to £1,300 1s. 1d. The secretary announced that Mr. F. Lord, M.L.A., had intimated his intention of becoming a life subscriber to the institution. The correspondence included a letter from Mr. R. J. Randall, forwarding a cheque for £5, representing the prize awarded him at the late Queensland Art Society's exhibition. From Mr. W. B. Carmichael, honorary treasurer seventh annual hospital sports carnival, forwarding a cheque for £21, and intimating that the non-success of the late meeting will not in any way deter the committee from making strenuous efforts in the future to reach the figures that have been attained in previous years, From Drs. Hare, Carvosso, Brookway, and Sutton, in acknowledgment of their recent appointment. The issue of the certificate of the nursing school to Miss J. M. Harding was reported. The resignation of Dr. W. B. Heyward of his position of resident medical officer was received and accepted. The doctor wrote in very appreciative terms of the pleasant memories that his sojourn in Brisbane would always have for him, and explained that only the advantages offered by his new appointment had led him to seek it. Dr. Heyward goes to the hospital at Launceston, where is his home. Mr. F. W. Clarke, one of the dispensers, and Nurses Broderick and Warner, whose term of service had expired, also tendered their resignations. Dr. F. J. Chapple was appointed to the vacancy on the medical staff, and Mr. Henry Gard was elected to the post of dispenser, for which there were four applications. There were two tenders for the electrical work of the institution, and that of Mr. A. G. Jackson, being the lower, was accepted; the contractor undertakes the maintenance in good working order of the electrical appliances of the hospital. The House Committee's report upon domestic matters was read and adopted. Instructions were given that tenders for supplies during the year 1900 be invited by advertisement in the usual way. Accounts to the amount of £1,230 6s. were passed for payment and cheques signed. Mr. Campbell submitted that it was high time that something was done in the direction of obtaining the requisite appliances to bring the laundry and kitchen of the hospital up to date, and suggested that it should be possible to raise the necessary money, or at least the moiety that the committee were required to provide, by loan. The subject was discussed at some length, and it was determined that the chairman and the mover should interview the Chief Secretary upon the matter. Subjoined are the reports, covering the past three weeks, that were presented at the meeting:— . . . . [50]

1899 12[edit]

Jackson contributes half a guinea to the Boer War soldiers fund

"COURIER" PATRIOTIC FUND. A TOTAL OF £1244 TO DATE. SUBSCRIPTIONS COMING IN FREELY. The subscription list opened by the pro-prietors of this journal for the benefit of those of the Queensland contingent who may suffer during the war in the Transvaal is still increasing. To secure the proper dis-tribution of the fund amongst those for whom it is designed, a committee will be formed from amongst the subscribers, and the matter will be placed in their hands. Subscriptions may be forwarded to the editor of this journal, or, may be handed to Mr. James Nicholls, of Herbert-street, Spring Hill. The list of subscriptions received to date is as follows:— Amount previously acknowledged £1160 10 2; Dr. Robert Thompson 1 1 0; J. Williams and family 2 8 0; A. G. Jackson 0 10 6; . . . [51]

1900s[edit]

1900[edit]

1900 01[edit]

Jackson appointed council member of Royal Society of Qld for ensuing year

ROYAL SOCIETY OF QUEENSLAND. The annual meeting of the Royal Society of Queensland was held at the Technical College rooms on Saturday evening. There was a good attendance. The retiring president, Mr. J. W. Sutton, who occupied the chair, delivered the presidential address, taking as his subject, "The Progress of Science and Applied Science." The subject was ably dealt with, and on the motion of the Hon. A. Norton, M.L.C., a hearty vote of thanks was passed to the president, both for his address and for the keen interest he had taken in everything that tended to the progress of the Royal Society. The report of the council for the previous year was read, showing a list of thirtythree new members. Reference was made to the death of two members of the society, Mr. Otham Blakey and Mr. James Thorpe. A large number of donations had been received from kindred societies in various parts of the world. The financial position of the society was satisfactory. The council desired to express their thanks to the Hon. J. R. Dickson, Chief Secretary, for his generous action in placing the sum of £50, together with an allowance of £1 for every £1 subscribed up to £100, at the disposal of the society. Reference was also made to the completion of the Queensland catalogue of scientific literature. The following were elected officers of the society for the present year:— President, Dr. J. Thomson; vicepresident, W. J. Byram; hon. treasurer, Hon. A. Norton, M.L.C.; hon. secretary, J. P. Bailey; hon. librarian, R. Illidge; members of council, F. M. Bailey, A. G. Jackson, C. J. Pound, J. Shirley, BSc, J. W. Sutton; hon. auditor, A. J. Turner. Dr. Thomson in a few words thanked the society for his appointment as president.[52]

1900 02[edit]

Jackson assists with limelight display for Patriotic Fund entertainment

PATRIOTIC FUND ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT. A limelight entertainment and grand concert, for which preparations have been made on an extensive scale, will be given in the Exhibition Building tonight in aid of the Patriotic Fund. Views of Holland, the Transvaal, and the military will be displayed by means of the limelight, and the Rev. C. E. James will give one of his highly-entertaining lectures in explanation of the scenes exhibited. It is stated that some photographs of the great military exercises in Germany and Switzerland have recently been obtained, and, if possible, Mr. A. G. Jackson, of Adelaide-street, will prepare one or two slides for display tonight. In view of the attention recently bestowed on the Swiss military system, these pictures will possess very special interest just now. Instrumental music will be provided by Mr. S. G. Benson, at the organ, and the Headquarters Band. Mr. W. H. Longbottom, Mr. S. Best, Mr. A. J. Baker, Mr. J. P. Hammond, and Mr. M. A. Harris will sing patriotic songs, and "The Absent-minded Beggar" will be recited by Mr. Innes Noad. It may be added that the members of the third contingent will be present throughout the evening. Members of the Defence Force attending are requested by advertisement to appear in uniform.[53]

1900 03[edit]
1900 04[edit]

Jackson makes comment on a paper presented to the Qld Electrical Association on Patents

ELECTRICAL ASSOCIATION. THE PATENTS LAW. The thirteenth monthly meeting of the Queensland Electrical Association was held last evening at the Technical College rooms, when Mr. C. E. Bernays read a very interesting paper on "Patents," with special reference to the electrical side of the question. Amongst other things, the very important matter of examination of patents was treated, and it was shown that any examination into the question of novelty was futile, as no Government guarantees the validity of a patent. Even in Germany, where a most searching inquiry, usually extending over four years, is made as to novelty, the number of lawsuits over patents is as great as in England, where the examination is practically confined to questions of correctness of drawings and lucidity of description. During the discussion which followed, it was suggested by Mr. A. G. Jackson that if ever a public library were established in Brisbane a set of patent specifications should be kept there for educational and technical purposes, so that a student or inventor could learn what the rest of the world was doing, without paying, as now required, 1s. for each specification which he looks at. When it is remembered that he may look at twenty in one afternoon, it will be seen that it becomes an expensive study. In England or any other country he could see the papers without cost, and could buy copies of them at 6d. or 8d. each. The examination into priority or novelty came in for general condemnation during the discussion, and a hope was expressed that the Federal Patent Office will imitate the English office in the matter of examinations. At the close of the discussion a hearty vote of thanks was passed to Mr. Bernays for his paper, and the members proceeded to examine some electrical apparatus exhibited by the president, Mr. E. C. Barton.[54]

1900 05[edit]

Jackson attends meeting of the Royal Society of Qld

Australian Vegetation. Paper at the Royal Society. The monthly meeting of the Royal Society of Queensland was held on Saturday evening. Dr. John Thomson, president, occupied the chair, and among those present were Mr. and Mrs. John Cameron, Mr. and Mrs. J. Shirley, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Owens, Mr. and Mrs. Turnbull, Mr. and Mrs. G. Watkins, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Gaden, Mrs. J. W. Brown, Messrs. B. Dunstan, J. M. Maclaren, Malcolm A. Harris, F. Whitteron, E. J. Ardall, S. G. Martin, W. C. Quinnell, A. E. Wright, S. R. F. Allom, A. J. Turner, C. Pritchard, A. G. Jackson, J. W. Sutton, W. R. Colledge, A. Kaye, W. Trimble, and others. The President feelingly referred to the loss the society had suffered by the death of Mr. A. J. Norton, an esteemed member, who held the position of librarian for the years 1895-6, and part of 1897, resigning during the latter year on account of his removal to Childers. A vote of sympathy to Mrs. Norton (his widow) and to his father (the Hon. A. Norton, M.L.C.), hon. treasurer of the society, was passed by the meeting. Mr. John Cameron was unanimously elected a member of the society, and Messrs. S. G. Martin, J. Maclaren, Thomas Inglis, and Major A. J. Boyd were nominated for membership. Mr. J. Shirley, B.Sc., read a paper on "Australian Vegetation, its Geological Development," in which he gave an account, drawn from the geological evidence yielded by plant fossils, of the various floras that have flourished in Australian lands, during the different epochs. In Australia, as in other portions of the globe, there has been gradual development from the lowest form of vegetable life to the highly organised flowering plants. Neglecting a single fossil of Devonian age, very doubtfully referred to the pine family, plant life commenced here as in other parts of the world, geologically considered, with plants of lowly type, seaweeds, gigantic club moses, enormous mare's tails, and allied forms. These strange plants, which formed the forest when the Gympie and Bowen beds were in process of formation, are now represented in Queensland by minute plants prized for their beauty in the bush-house, our lycopodiums and selaginellas. A great change is visible when studying the plants whose remains abound in the Burrum and Ipswich coal measures. The gigantic club mosses and equisetums are still present, but they are few in number compared with the numerous ferns, zamias, and cone-bearing trees. Many of the conifers are allies of the beautiful Chinese and Japanese sacred tree, the maidenhair tree, Ginkgo biloba. In Cretaceous times, as represented by certain plant-bearing beds near Oxley, the lower sections of flowering plants come into existence. From these beds, if Baron von Ettingshausen's determination may be accepted, leaves of oaks, beeches, figs, grevilleas, lomatias, &c., have been obtained. Queensland is very poorly provided with Tertiary rocks, and there is a great gap in the yestimony of the rocks through Eocene, Miocene, and Pliocene times, so that we get little insight into the epochs which marked the first appearanco of the star-flowered and tubular-flowered dicotyledons. A number of lantern slids, showing the character of the Queensland vegetation at different stages, were shown by aid of the limelight, a well as a number of microphotographs of sections of fossil wood, for the preparation of which the lecturer was indebted to Dr. John Thomson. Lantern slides were made from the microphotographs by Mr. Wills, of the Agricultural Department. Two sets of backboard diagrams, showing (1) the succession of Queensland strata, and (2) the gradual development of the various classes of plants, were drawn on the blackboard by Mr. Lunn. Mr. Shirley also exhibited a large number fossils, belonging to Mr. J. H. Simmonds, a member of the society, which the latter gentleman had lent for the occasion. The lantern was in the hands of Mr. W. Tyas, who manipulated it with his usual skill. The President announced that Mr. W. C. Quinnel, the Government veterinary inspector, would deliver a lecture at the June meeting on the inspection of meat, and would illustrate it with a large number of diagrams, specimens, &c. Before dispersing the members inspected the large number of donations to the library which had been received since the April meeting.[55]

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Brief biography of Alfred George Jackson

PERSONAL and Anecdotal. . . . Mr. Alfred George Jackson, well known in electrical circles, commenced the serious part of life as an apprentice to chemical engineering at Manchester, where he was born and educated. When he came to Australia he spent a few years in Sydney, Mount Morgan, Charters Towers, and other places, before he settled down in Brisbane as an electrician, and then started in business for himself. He became a partner with A. G. Harris (sic, Harriss), whom he afterwards bought out, and formed the business into a limited company with the sole rights of the Synchronome Electrical Company of Australasia Ltd. Mr. Jackson has the distinction of carrying out the first installation of electric lighting of shops in Charters Towers. In his younger days he was a champion lacrosse player in the Lancashire County team, and on one occasion played with the All England lacrosse team against the All American team at Manchester. He also played in interstate teams, representing both New South Wales and Queensland. [56]

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Brief biography of Alfred George Jackson

PERSONAL AND ANECDOTAL. . . . Closely associated with the progress of wireless in Queensland is Mr. A. G. Jackson, A.M.I.E.E. (London), who will celebrate the anniversary of his birthday on October 3. During the war he was one of the few who were allowed a licence for that period. Mr. Jackson is the managing director of the Synchronome Electrical Company of Australia Ltd., and a shareholder in various other companies. A native of Manchester, England, he received his education at the Manchester Grammar school and Owen's College, Victoria University, Manchester. In 1882 he commenced his professional career as an apprentice to chemical engineering, and came to Australia in 1887. After spending a few years in Sydney, Mount Morgan, Charters Towers, and other places Mr. Jackson finally settled in Brisbane, joining the staff of Barton and White as an electrician. Whilst in Charters Towers, Mr. Jackson carried out the first installation of electric lighting in that town. He started in business for himself as an electrical engineer in 1896, and in 1904 floated the business into a limited company. In his youthful days he was a prominent lacrosse player with the Lancashire County team, and represented England against the American team in Manchester in 1885. He also played in New South Wales and Queensland teams. Afterwards he took to bowls playing with South Brisbane and Balmoral clubs, and he was one of the promoters of the Wynnum club. [57]

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A rambling overview of the professional life of Alfred George Jackson

A NODDING ACQUAINTANCE with OLD FATHER TIME. By A. H. THOMAS. MR. JACKSON is now 70 years of age. But in his dealings with Father Time the associations seem to have been very happy for that dignitary has dealt very kindly with Mr. Jackson. His 70 years sit very lightly on his shoulders. Active in mind and body and with an outlook which still retains the burning zeal of the pure scientist rather than the baser mercenary motives of the man of business, he can look back over the years and tell a story which is fascinating in its manysidedness and in its variety. Mr. Jackson can still see romance in his work. His mind still moves sturdily to the impulse of a stiff mechanical or electrical problem. It still stirs his imagination. AN EGG STORY. It is this imagination in him which brings to light one remarkable story. The City Hall clock is a far more distinguished member of the clock aristocracy than most citizens realise. It has mechanical appliances which are found in no other clock in the world, and it is the biggest of Its kind in the Commonwealth. How did Mr. Jackson come to evolve some of this mechanism? Thereby hangs a tale. The history of science bristles with examples of discoveries made by accident. No fiction writer could have imagined the trend of events which led to the designing of certain appliances in that clock. For the imagination cannot jump in one bound from city hall clock mechanisms to — the preservation of eggs. In 1912 a gentleman approached the Queensland Government with a simple device for the preservation of eggs. It was so ridiculously simple that the Government decided to give it a trial. Arguing that an egg went bad merely because the yolk was allowed to come in direct contact with the shell, this man maintained that if the yolk was prevented from making this contact with the shell by mechanical means it would keep in good condition for an indefinite period. All that was required was a method of turning the egg over once in 24 hours. This man asked Mr. Jackson to devise a mechanism which would revolve a ship's tank containing 2,000 eggs once in 24 hours, by a slow continuous rotary motion. The machinery was designed and built and the experiment commenced. At the end of three months the eggs were found to be in perfect condition. It was in the designing of that mechanism which had peculiar features that Mr. Jackson was able to solve some of the most important mechanical difficulties in the construction of the City Hall clock 20 years later. BACK TO THE SEVENTIES. But we have jumped far ahead of our story. His story really begins in the late seventies when as a student at the Manchester University he saw and spoke through the first telephone ever brought to England and displayed purely as a scientific novelty. The line was "rigged" from one room to another and speech through the apparatus was considered the last word in scientific achievement. Then, in 1882, although arc lamps, with carbon points, had been in use for some time, Swan, the famous London electrician, demonstrated his first incandescent lamp in London, and in the same year Mr. Jackson saw the self-same demonstration in Manchester. People actually paid for admission to see a rather feeble electric lamp shedding a very meagre light. Even before that time, in the seventies, Mr. Jackson remembers a demonstration at which thousands attended, of an arc lamp, given on the roof of the Princess Theatre, Manchester, of some enormous candle power, but run from Bunsen batteries which did not last very long. The dynamo electric machine was not in use at that time. In 1879 Mr. Jackson made his first electromotor to run from batteries which being successful induced him to make others for his friends. The wonderful world clock by which time in any part of the globe can be seen at a glance. Top: The master clock at the City Hall. Right: The indicator Board in Mr. Jackson's office by which time faults in the City Hall clock are soon detected. (Start Photo Caption) Mr. Jackson photographed with his historic phonograph on August 20, 1891. (End Photo Caption) FIRST ELECTRIC PLANT. Then Mr. Jackson came to Australia. He was associated with the first electric lighting in Sydney, but his first installation of electric light that he undertook personally in Australia was in Charters Towers in 1887. In those days, of course, only arc lamps were is use for public lighting, and at one time it was necessary for the carbons in every street lamp to be changed daily. In 1890, after doing a good deal of work for electrical firms in Sydney, he came to Brisbane. Here he installed the first public night lighting in the State, to illuminate pony races at the Exhibition Ground (on its present site). The plant was erected on the hill overlooking the grounds, and eight or nine arc lamps in series illuminated the grounds. He tells an amusing story, which throws some light on the conditions under which pony racing was conducted at the time. One evening the man who was "running the show" got word that he was to be robbed of the takings late in the evening. He therefore instructed Mr. Jackson to switch off the light at a specified time for a few minutes. This was done, and the manager made his getaway in the dark. THE STORY OF THE PHONOGRAPH. The most fascinating section of Mr. Jackson's story, however, has to do with the first Edison phonograph brought to Queensland by the firm of Barton and White, which Mr. Jackson had joined in 1890. It was a phonograph typical of the early box and horn type with the cylindrical records. But the mechanical governor motor had not been thought of in those days and the machine was run by electricity off batteries. Hark, ye people who grumble today because a good electrical gramophone costs £50, Barton and White paid £200 for that little box of tricks. What is even more amazing, they got their money back in a week by public demonstrations during Exhibition Week in 1891. One Christmas Eve over £80 was taken. NOT SEALING WAX, BUT — Wise in their time and generation, Messrs. Barton and White quickly realised that the mere payment of admission to a room to hear the phonograph being played in the ordinary way was not good for business. So they fitted to the machine about a dozen gadgets which were in effect earphones, but which resembled more our modern doctor's stethoscope, two metallic terminals fitting right into the ears of the listener. (See photograph.) In this way a dozen people could listen at one time at a charge of 6d. or 1s. Often when business was brisk they were allowed to hear only half a record in this way when they were bustled out of the way to make room for others in the long waiting queue. "At the end of a long day," said Mr. Jackson, "you've no idea what those ear pieces were like. They wore thoroughly waxed I can tell you. But that was in the days before we had a Health Week." Then followed a triumphant tour of the State. Schools and public lecture halls were used, and there were some rare goings-on. The titbit of the evening was always the recording on a wax cylinder of the speech of the presiding Mayor or other civic dignitory, which was immediately played back to him, to the always obvious delight of the audience. In the sugar mills of the North they had the inspiration to record the kanaka lingo, and induced one man to sing one of the island ditties in his own language. When the song was played back to him consternation, fear, wonder, and delight were all registered in turn on his countenance. And so this triumph tour progressed. Some very interesting records were made of the McAdoo Singers at the Theatre Royal. Mr. Jackson also made it a practice to secure records of speeches by almost all the Queensland Governors of the period. These were preserved for some years for presentation to the Royal Society, but recent inquiries as to their whereabouts reveal that they have been lost. AN HISTORIC EVENT. One particularly interesting event in this period was the unusual demonstration at the annual conference of the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science in 1895. A newspaper of the time describes the events at the conclusion of the conference this way:— Towards the close of the conversazione two interesting records were taken on a phonograph, of which Mr. A. G. Jackson had control. The first to speak into the instrument was his Excellency the Governor. Sir Henry Norman said: "Gentlemen, you have given this entertainment in honour of the meeting of the Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science. I heartily congratulate you on the success which has attended your efforts, and I think, on behalf of this great assemblage, I may venture to thank you most sincerely for the enjoyment and instruction and entertainment we have received." (Applause.) Mr. Brunton Stephens next recited into the phonograph the following verse, which he had composed for the occasion:— God said, Let there be light, They but fulfil, With banded aim, his first recorded will, Who pass, obedient to the prime command, The torch of science on from hand to hand. Subsequently many people listened to the records, that of the Governor's speech being particularly clear and distinct. What an interesting relic would be the record of Mr. Brunton Stephens reciting his lines, which, by the way, must be a stranger in most of the anthologies of Australian verse. That record, however, has gone the way of it fellows. Mr. Jackson said that when he was travelling by steamer he had great troubles, especially in the tropics, in preserving these wax cylinders. Once placed in the vicinity of the engine room or a funnel of a steamer they were reduced to mere grease. More than once this fate befell a cherished wax record of a prominent singer. These cylinders, made of beeswax, were remarkably durable. Mr. Jackson declares that he could play some of those records 500 times without any appreciable signs of wear and tear. It is more than we can say of the average gramophone record of today. THE CLOCK BUSINESS. But we have lingered too long with Mr. Jackson's famous phonograph. We pass on to what is perhaps the most absorbing of his activities, since it has occupied his almost entire attention for many years. It is his association with the clock business. It was in 1904 that he secured the Australian rights for the Synchronome system in Australia. The first tower clock in Queensland, that in the tower at the South Brisbane City Hall, was erected by Mr. Jackson in this year. He recalls that being a comparatively new man in the city, the civic authorities were inclined to distrust his workmanship and would not pay him a penny until six months after the installation. Clock installations in all the capital cities of Australia and New Zealand kept him busy for some years. The culminating point in this work was his design and construction of the City Hall clock. UNCANNY CONTROL. There are a number of features about the control of this clock which deserve special mention in this brief summary of Mr. Jackson's life and work. In the construction of it there are many astonishing features. But perhaps the most interesting of them all is a mere afterthought. When the clock was first started Mr. Jackson was worried by the people who rushed to his office to inform him that the minute hand on one dial of the clock was not in conformity with the others. The inventive brains of Mr. Jackson and his son, Mr. A. A. Jackson, did not idle long on the problem. Today if the hands of the City Hall clock do not correspond, Mr. Jackson, sitting at his office desk will know about it before the hour is out. By pressing a button he can hear the master clock ticking. Every hour, still sitting at his desk, he can check the City Hall clock with the Standard Eastern time at the Observatory. It is never allowed to vary more than two seconds. He can take up a telephone receiver and listen to the clock striking the hour. Every half minute a light flashes in Mr. Jackson's office. That tells him that the hands are in unison and that the clock is working satisfactorily. All this information and a great deal more besides, Mr. Jackson gleans from a small indicator-board installed in his office. His method of checking the clock at each hour is especially ingenious. In this indicator board, which is pictured on this page, we see the light on the left (A), the telephone receiver on the right (B). In the centre of the board is a little black button (C). By taking up the telephone receiver Mr. Jackson can hear the City Hall clock strike the first note of the hour (incidentally it is the first stroke which denotes the end of one hour and the beginning of the next). The little button when pressed connects the light with the standard eastern time at the Observatory. Thus the strike of the City Hall clock can be checked with the observatory time at any minute. The City Hall clock is never allowed to vary more than two seconds with this standard time. But that is not all that this indicator board tells Mr. Jackson. Above these three little appliances will be seen a series of shutters. Each shutter is connected with the public synchronome clocks in the city. At each hour the shutters drop. If they do not drop Mr. Jackson knows that something is amiss; moreover he knows at a glance which clock has gone astray. Sometimes these shutters all fall together like drilled soldiers in the one second. This indicates that the synchronisation throughout the series of clock faces is perfect. When engineers from all parts of Australia visited Brisbane recently for the engineering conference they expressed amazement at this device, and declared that in no other city in the Commonwealth was such a close check kept on public time pieces. Another great scientific curiosity inspected with the greatest admiration by the visiting engineers was Mr. Jackson's world clock. This clever device, which even some of the engineers found difficulty in understanding fully, makes it possible for one to tell at a glance the time in any part of the world, at any minute of the day. Mr. Jackson is most fascinating when one entices him to talk on his pet subject — time keeping. He will talk for hours about the City Hall clock. But let him digress on the subject of accurate time keeping and he will unfold a wondrous tale of scientific accuracies. He will show you a clock in his office which will run for a whole year without deviating more than 20 seconds from strictly accurate time. But when you gasp at that achievement he will tell of the clock he saw in the Woolwich Observatory kept in a specially constructed room where the temperature is kept constant, and where the pendulum actually swings in a vacuum. That clock does not deviate more than one hundredth of a second in a year. That to Mr. Jackson's mind is a really good clock. The natural aptitude which Mr. Jackson displays in his work lives again in his son, Mr. A. A. Jackson pictured on this page. It is he who attends the City Hall clock nowadays and sees that it retains the highest mechanical efficiency possible under the circum- (Start Photo Caption) Inset below: Mr. A. G. Jackson himself — 70 years old — still hale and hearty. (End Photo Caption) The time has come, the Walrus said, To write of synchronomic sums, Of Town Hall clocks and phonographs And lamps and pendulums. (With abject apologies to Lewis Carroll.) ON this page you may read of many things, not necessarily of shoes and ships and sealing wax, or even of cabbages and kings but of many interesting experiences of a man who has virtually seen the growth and development of modern science with his own eyes, and who played no small part in that development. He spoke over the first telephone ever brought to England. He saw the first incandescent electric lamp lit publicly in Manchester in 1882. He operated the first X-ray plant in Queensland for the medical profession. He was the first man to show Queensland people the wonders of the Edison phonograph, the forerunner of the modern gramophone. He built the first open air night lighting plant in Queensland. He is the pioneer of accurate and modern timekeeping in Australia and introduced the system of synchronome clocks into Australia and New Zealand. He built the first tower clock in Queensland in 1904. As the culminating point in his life work he designed and built our much prized City Hall clock — a modern masterpiece in time keeping. He is Mr. A. G. Jackson, of the famous Clock House in Elizabeth Street, Brisbane. (Start Photo Caption) Mr. A. A. Jackson, like Father like Son — (End Photo Caption)[58]

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Brief obituary for Alfred George Jackson

DESIGNED CITY HALL CLOCK. Death of Mr. A. G. Jackson. WYNNUM, August 27. The death has occurred of Mr. A. G. Jackson, of Ashton Street, Wynnum, and of Clark House, Elizabeth Street, Brisbane, at the age of 72 years. Mr. Jackson, who was born in Manchester, was educated at the Manchester Grammar School, Owen's College and the Manchester University. He commenced work with Levensteins Ltd., the largest dye works in Manchester, and while there took a course at the London University, where he won a gold medal for dye research work. He also carried out experimental work on lamps. He came to Australia early in 1887 and after a short stay in Sydney moved to Charters Towers, where in 1887 he undertook his first personal installation of electric light in Australia, and one of the first installations in Queensland. In 1890 he took up business in Queensland with the firm of Barton and White. Mr. Jackson's life was full of incident, particularly in the way of science. He spoke on the first telephone ever brought to England. He saw the first incandescent, electric lamp lit publicly in Manchester in 1882. He operated the first X-ray plant in Queensland for the medical profession. He was the first man to show Queensland people the wonders of the Edison phonograph. He built the first open air night lighting plant in Queensland, was the pioneer of accurate and modern timekeeping in Australia and introduced the system of synchronome clocks into Australia and New Zealand. He built the first clock tower in Queensland in 1904, and as a culminating point in his life work designed and built the City Hall clock for Brisbane. KEEN SPORTSMAN. In his younger days Mr. Jackson took a keen interest in sport. He played lacrosse in England with Manchester County and for England on several occasions, once against America. When he came to Australia he played for both New South Wales and Queensland in intercolonial times. Later on he was a life member of both the Wynnum and Balmoral Bowling Clubs, also a member of the South Brisbane Club. In his business sphere he was a member of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, London, an associate member of the Institution of Engineers of Australia, a member of the Royal Society and the American Electro Chemical Society, a councillor of the Chamber of Manufacturers. He was also a member of the Masonic Club, the R.A.C.Q., the Royal Society of St. George. Mr. Jackson was a member of the Church of England and of the Wynnum North Progress Association. For some two years Mr. Jackson had not enjoyed the best of health, but the illness which resulted in his death on Sunday overtook him about a week ago.[59]

Brief obituary for Alfred George Jackson

OBITUARY. Mr. A. G. Jackson.— The designer and builder of the City Hall clock, Mr. Alfred George Jackson, died at his home in Ashton Street, Wynnum, on Sunday morning, at the age of 71 years. Mr. Jackson was born in Manchester, and was educated at the Manchester Grammar School and Owen's College, in the same city. He came to Australia in 1887, and first resided in Sydney. Several years later he came to Queensland. On Christmas Day, 1890 he married Miss Elizabeth Hart. He was one of the pioneers of the electrical trade in Queensland. In his early days, Mr. Jackson was a noted lacrosse player. He played for England against America in 1885, and after his arrival in Australia he played for New South Wales and Queensland. He was a life member of the Wynnum and Balmoral bowling clubs, and was a member of the Brisbane Masonic Club. Deceased was a councillor of the Queensland Chamber of Manufacturers, and a member of the Institution of Engineers (London), associate member of the Australian Institute of Engineers, American Electro Chemical Society, Royal Society of Queensland, Royal Society of St. George. He is survived by his widow, and one son, Mr. Arthur A. Jackson, Wynnum. M[60]

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