Flora of New York/Santalales

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Brassicales
Flora of New York — Santalales
Caryophyllales 1
Droseraceae, Plumbaginaceae, Polygonaceae
Table of
contents
Genus
index
Protected species index Invasive species index


The Santalales is a largely parasitic order of plants. The only one of its families that is known to have native or naturalized members in New York is the Santalaceae.

Family Santalaceae[edit]

The Santalaceae (sandalwood family) ... [1]

Comandra clade[edit]

Also treated as the Comandraceae[2] (bastard-toadflax family), this group contains only the two species bastard toadflax (Comandra umbellata) and false toadflax (Geocaulon lividum), both of which are native to New York.

Genus Comandra[edit]

Santalaceae — Comandra

|-style="font-size:12px;line-height:14px" |width=100 align=center|Comandra |width=100 align=center|Bastard-toadflax |nowrap=true align=center|N.Y. Status |width=100 align=center|Images |width=100 align=center|Distribution |width=100 align=center|1

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Comandra umbellata
 (L.) Nutt.
ssp. umbellata

1753. Thesium umbellatum L.
1818. Comandra umbellata Nutt.
1905. Comandra richardsiana Fernald
1982. C. umbellata ssp. richardsiana Á&D.Löve

|nowrap="true" style="font-size:11px;line-height:13px"|Bastard toadflax | nowrap="true" style="font-size:11px;line-height:13px"|N.Y. native,
Secure

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Comandra umbellata (4049302544).jpg

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Nymap.svg

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Genus Geocaulon[edit]

Santalaceae — Geocaulon

|-style="font-size:12px;line-height:14px" |width=100 align=center|Geocaulon |width=100 align=center|False-toadflax |nowrap=true align=center|N.Y. Status |width=100 align=center|Images |width=100 align=center|Distribution |width=100 align=center|1

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Geocaulon lividum
 (Richardson) Fernald

1823. Comandra livida Richardson
1921. Geocaulon lividum Fernald

|nowrap="true" style="font-size:11px;line-height:13px"|False toadflax | nowrap="true" style="font-size:11px;line-height:13px"|N.Y. native,
Endangered

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Geocaulon lividum BB-1913.png

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Nymap.svg

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Cervantesia clade[edit]

Also treated as the family Cervantesiaceae,[1] this is a group of parasitic flowering plants. Its only native or naturalized New York genus is Pyrularia.

Genus Pyrularia[edit]

Pyrularia contains two species native to the Himalayas of China and one native to the southeastern United States.[1] Buffalonut (Pyrularia pubera) is a root-parasitic shrub, Native to the Appalachians and foothills from Southern Pennsylvania to Alabama and Georgia. [2] It appears to have naturalized on Long Island.

Santalaceae — Pyrularia

|-style="font-size:12px;line-height:14px" |width=100 align=center|Pyrularia |width=100 align=center|Buffalo-nut |nowrap=true align=center|N.Y. Status |width=100 align=center|Images |width=100 align=center|Distribution |width=100 align=center|1

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Pyrularia pubera
 Michx.

1803. Pyrularia pubera Michx.

|nowrap="true" style="font-size:11px;line-height:13px"|Buffalo-nut,
Oil-nut | nowrap="true" style="font-size:11px;line-height:13px"|Introduced,
US South native

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Pyrularia pubera NRCS-1.jpg

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Nymap.svg

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Viscum clade[edit]

Also treated as the family Viscaceae[1] or tribe Visceae,[2] this group contains seven genera worldwide, two of which have single New York native species. These are branch parasites

Genus Arceuthobium[edit]

Arceuthobium pusillum or dwarf mistletoe parasitizes the branches of spruce, pine, and tamarack trees and is one of many causes for the deformations known as "witches brooms" seen on those trees.

Santalaceae — Arceuthobium

|-style="font-size:12px;line-height:14px" |width=100 align=center|Arceuthobium |width=100 align=center|Dwarf-mistletoe |nowrap=true align=center|N.Y. Status |width=100 align=center|Images |width=100 align=center|Distribution |width=100 align=center|1

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Arceuthobium pusillum
 Peck

1872. Arceuthobium pusillum Peck
1891. Razoumofskya pusilla Kuntze

|nowrap="true" style="font-size:11px;line-height:13px"|Dwarf mistletoe,
Eastern dwarf-mistletoe | nowrap="true" style="font-size:11px;line-height:13px"|N.Y. native,
Vulnerable

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Arceuthobium pusillum 1377003.jpg

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Nymap.svg

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Genus Phoradendron[edit]

Santalaceae — Phoradendron

|-style="font-size:12px;line-height:14px" |width=100 align=center|Phoradendron |width=100 align=center|Mistletoe |nowrap=true align=center|N.Y. Status |width=100 align=center|Images |width=100 align=center|Distribution |width=100 align=center|1

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Phoradendron leucarpum
(Raf.) Reveal & M.C.Johnst.

1817. Viscum leucarpum Raf.
[1]
1820. Viscum serotinum Raf.
1911. non P. leucocarpum Pacz.
1957. P. serotinum M.C.Johnst.
1989. P. leucarpum Reveal & M.C.Johnst.

|nowrap="true" style="font-size:11px;line-height:13px"|American mistletoe,
Oak mistletoe,
Eastern mistletoe,
Hairy mistletoe | nowrap="true" style="font-size:11px;line-height:13px"|N.Y. native,
Extirpated

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Mistletoe-3428.jpg

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Nymap.svg

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  1. A pending conservation proposal would change the basionym of Phoradendron leucarpum from Viscum leucarpum to Viscum serotinum, avoiding the P. leucocarpum homonym and making the accepted name Phoradendron serotinum.

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