User:Vuara/CHAPTER II (MMY Gita)

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CHAPTER II CHƯƠNG II
  1. Sanjaya said: To him thus overcome by compassion, full of sorrow, his eyes distressed and filled with tears, Madhusudana (Lord Krishna) spoke these words:
  2. The Blessed Lord said: Whence has this blemish, alien to honourable men, causing disgrace and opposed to heaven, come upon you, Arjuna, at this untimely hour?
  3. Partha! Yield not to unmanliness. It is unworthy of you. Shake off this paltry faintheartedness. Stand up, O scorcher of enemies!
  4. Arjuna said: How shall I fight Bhishma and Drona with arrows on the battlefield, O Madhusudana? Worthy of reverence are they, O slayer of enemies!
  5. It is surely better to live even on alms in this world than to slay these noble-minded masters; for though they are desirous of gain, having killed them I should enjoy only blood-stained pleasures in this world.
  6. We do not know which is better for us: that we should conquer them or they should conquer us. The sons of Dhritarashta stand face to face with us. If we killed them we should not wish to live.
  7. My nature smitten with the taint of weakness, confused in mind about dharma, I pray Thee, tell me decisively what is good for me. I am Thy disciple; teach me for I have taken refuge in Thee.
  8. Indeed I do not see what could dispel the grief that dries up my senses, though I should obtain an unrivalled and prosperous kingdom on earth and even lordship of the gods.
  9. Sanjaya said: Gudakesha, oppressor of the foe, having spoken thus to Hrishikesha, said to Govinda (Lord Krishna): 'I will not fight' and fell silent.
  10. To him, O Bhavata (Dhritarashtra), sorrowing in the midst of the two armies, Hrishikesha smilingly spoke these words:
  11. The Blessed Lord said: You grieve for those for whom there should be no grief, yet speak as do the wise. Wise men grieve neither for the dead nor for the living.
  12. There never was a time when I was not, nor you, nor these rulers of men. Nor will there ever be a time when all of us shall cease to be.
  13. As the dweller in this body passes into childhood, youth and age, so also does he pass into another body. This does not bewilder the wise.
  14. Contacts (of the senses) with their objects, O son of Kunti, give rise to (the experience of) cold and heat, pleasure and pain. Transient, they come and go. Bear them patiently, O Bharata!
  15. That man indeed whom these (contacts) do not disturb, who is even-minded in pleasure and pain, steadfast, he is fit for immortality, O best of men!
  16. The unreal has no being; the real never ceases to be. The final truth about them both has thus been perceived by the seers of ultimate Reality.
  17. Know That to be indeed indestructible by which all this is pervaded. None can work the destruction of this immutable Being.
  18. These bodies are known to have an end; the dweller in the body is eternal, imperishable, infinite. Therefore, O Bharata, fight!
  19. He who understands him to be the slayer, and he who takes him to be the slain, both fail to perceive the truth. He neither slays nor is slain.
  20. He is never born, nor does he ever die; nor once having been, does he cease to be. Unborn, eternal, everlasting, ancient, he is not slain when the body is slain.
  21. One who knows him to be indestructible, everlasting, unborn, undying, how can that man, O Partha, slay or cause anyone to slay ?
  22. As a man casting off worn-out garments takes other new ones, so the dweller in the body casting off worn-out bodies takes others that are new.
  23. Weapons cannot cleave him, nor fire burn him; water cannot wet him, nor wind dry him away.
  24. He is uncleavable; he cannot be burned; he cannot be wetted, nor yet can he be dried. He is eternal, all-pervading, stable, immovable, ever the same.
  25. He is declared to be unmanifest, unthinkable, unchangeable; therefore knowing him as such you should not grieve.
  26. Even if you think of him as constantly taking birth and constantly dying, even then, O mighty-armed, you should not grieve like this.
  27. Certain indeed is death for the born and certain is birth for the dead; therefore over the inevitable you should not grieve.
  28. Creatures are unmanifest in the beginning, manifest in the middle state and unmanifest again at the end, Oh Bharata! What grief is there in this?
  29. One sees him as a wonder, another likewise speaks of him as a wonder, and as a wonder another hears of him. Yet even on (seeing, speaking and hearing) some do not understand him.
  30. He who dwells in the body of everyone is eternal and invulnerable, O Bharata; therefore you should not grieve for any creature whatsoever.
  31. Even if you consider your own dharma you should not waver, for there is nothing better for a kshatriya than a battle in accord with dharma.
  32. Happy are the kshatriyas, O Partha, who find, unsought, such a battle - an open door to heaven.
  33. Now, if you do not engage in this battle, which is in accord with dharma, then casting away your own dharma and good fame, you will incur sin.
  34. Moreover men will ever tell of your disgrace, and to a man of honour ill fame is worse than death.
  35. The great warriors will think you fled from battle out of fear, and they who held you in esteem will belittle you.
  36. Your enemies will speak many ill words of you and will deride your strength. What greater pain than this!
  37. Slain, you will reach heaven; victorious, you will enjoy the earth. Therefore, O son of Kunti, stand up, resolved to fight!
  38. Having gained equanimity in pleasure and pain, in gain and loss, in victory and defeat, then come out to fight. Thus you will not incur sin.
  39. This which has been set before you is understanding in terms of Sankhya; hear it now in terms of Yoga. Your intellect established through it, O Partha, you will cast away the binding influence of action.
  40. In this (Yoga) no effort is lost and no obstacle exists. Even a little of this dharma delivers from great fear.
  41. In this Yoga, O joy of the Kurus, the resolute intellect is one-pointed, but many-branched and endlessly diverse are the intellects of the irresolute.
  42. The undiscerning who are engrossed in the letter of the Veda, O Partha, and declare that there is nothing else, speak flowery words.
  43. Filled with desires, with heaven as their goal, (their words) proclaim birth as the reward of action and prescribe many special rites for the attainment of enjoyment and power.
  44. The resolute state of intellect does not arise in the mind of those who are deeply attached to enjoyment and power and whose thought is captivated by those (flowery words).
  45. The Vedas' concern is with the three gunas. Be without the three gunas, O Arjuna, freed from duality, ever firm in purity, independent of possessions, possessed of the Self.
  46. To the enlightened brahmin all the Vedas are of no more use then is a small well in a place flooded with water on every side.
  47. You have control over action alone, never over its fruits. Live not for the fruits of action, nor attach yourself to inaction.
  48. Established in Yoga, O winner of wealth, perform actions having abandoned attachment and having become balanced in success and failure, for balance of mind is called Yoga.
  49. Far away, indeed, from the balanced intellect is the action devoid of greatness, O winner of wealth. Take refuge in the intellect. Pitiful are those who live for the fruits (of action).
  50. He whose intellect is united (with the Self) casts off both good and evil even here. Therefore, devote yourself to Yoga. Yoga is skill in action.
  51. The wise, their intellect truly united with the Self, having renounced the fruits born of their actions and being liberated from the bonds of birth, arrive at a state devoid of suffering.
  52. When your intellect crosses the mire of delusion, then will you gain indifference to what has been heard and what is yet to be heard.
  53. When your intellect, bewildered by Vedic texts, shall stand unshaken, steadfast in the Self, then will you attain to Yoga.
  54. Arjuna said: What are the signs of a man whose intellect is steady, who is absorbed in the Self, O Keshava? How does the man of steady intellect speak, how does he sit, how does he walk?
  55. The Blessed Lord said: When a man completely casts off all desires that have gone (deep) into the mind, O Partha, when he is satisfied in the Self through the Self alone, then is he said to be of steady intellect.
  56. He whose mind is unshaken in the midst of sorrows, who amongst pleasures is free from longing, from whom attachment, fear and anger have departed, he is said to be a sage of steady intellect.
  57. He who has no undue fondness towards anything, who neither exults nor recoils on gaining what is good or bad, his intellect is established.
  58. And when such a man withdraws his senses from their objects, as a tortoise draws in its limbs from all sides, his intellect is established.
  59. The objects of sense turn away from him who does not feed upon them, but the taste for them persists. On seeing the Supreme even this taste ceases.
  60. The turbulent senses, O son of Kunti, forcibly carry away the mind even of a discerning man who endeavours (to control them).
  61. Having brought them all under control, let him sit united, looking to Me as Supreme; for his intellect is established whose senses are subdued.
  62. Pondering on objects of the senses, a man develops attachment for them; from attachment springs up desire, and desire gives rise to anger.
  63. From anger arises delusion; from delusion unsteadiness of memory; from unsteadiness of memory destruction of intellect; through the destruction of the intellect he perishes.
  64. But he who is self-disciplined, who moves among the objects of the senses with the senses freed from attachment and aversion and under his own control, he attains to 'grace'.
  65. In 'grace' is born an end to all his sorrows. Indeed the intellect of the man of exalted consciousness soon becomes firmly established.
  66. He who is not established has no intellect, nor has he any steady thought. The man without steady thought has no peace; for one without peace how can there be happiness?
  67. When a man's mind is governed by any of the wandering senses, his intellect is carried away by it as a ship by the wind on water.
  68. Therefore he whose senses are all withdrawn from their objects, O mighty-armed, his intellect is established.
  69. That which is night for all beings, therein the self-controlled is awake. That wherein beings are awake is night for the sage who sees.
  70. He whom all desires enter as waters enter the ever-full and unmoved sea attains peace, and not he who cherishes desires.
  71. When a man acts without longing, having relinquished all desires, free from the sense of 'I' and 'mine', he attains to peace.
  72. This is the state of Brahman, O Partha. Having attained it, a man is not deluded. Established in that, even at the last moment, he attains eternal freedom in divine consciousness.
  1. Sanjaya nói: To him thus overcome by compassion, full of sorrow, his eyes distressed and filled with tears, Madhusudana (Đấng Krishna) nói những lời này:
  2. Đấng ThiêngLiêng nói: Whence has this blemish, alien to honourable men, causing disgrace and opposed to heaven, come upon you, Arjuna, at this untimely hour?
  3. Partha! Yield not to unmanliness. It is unworthy of you. Shake off this paltry faintheartedness. Stand up, O scorcher of enemies!
  4. Arjuna said: How shall I fight Bhishma and Drona with arrows on the battlefield, O Madhusudana? Worthy of reverence are they, O slayer of enemies!
  5. It is surely better to live even on alms in this world than to slay these noble-minded masters; for though they are desirous of gain, having killed them I should enjoy only blood-stained pleasures in this world.
  6. We do not know which is better for us: that we should conquer them or they should conquer us. The sons of Dhritarashta stand face to face with us. If we killed them we should not wish to live.
  7. My nature smitten with the taint of weakness, confused in mind about dharma, I pray Thee, tell me decisively what is good for me. I am Thy disciple; teach me for I have taken refuge in Thee.
  8. Indeed I do not see what could dispel the grief that dries up my senses, though I should obtain an unrivalled and prosperous kingdom on earth and even lordship of the gods.
  9. Sanjaya nói: Gudakesha, oppressor of the foe, having spoken thus to Hrishikesha, said to Govinda (Đấng Krishna): 'I will not fight' and fell silent.
  10. To him, O Bhavata (Dhritarashtra), sorrowing in the midst of the two armies, Hrishikesha mỉmcười nói những lời này:
  11. Đấng ThiêngLiêng nói: Ngươi tiếcthương cho những ai không nên thươngtiếc, vậy mà nói như là thôngthái lắm. Những người minhtriết không có tiếcthương cho người sống mà cũng khôngcho kẻ chết.
  12. Không baogiờ mà ta không có ở đây, ngươi cũngvậy, và các quânquan vuachúa này cũngvậy. Cũng như không có baogiờ tấtcả mọingười chúngta sẽ hết cómặt ở đây.
  13. As the dweller in this body passes into childhood, youth and age, so also does he pass into another body. This does not bewilder the wise.
  14. Contacts (of the senses) with their objects, O son of Kunti, give rise to (the experience of) cold and heat, pleasure and pain. Transient, they come and go. Bear them patiently, O Bharata!
  15. That man indeed whom these (contacts) do not disturb, who is even-minded in pleasure and pain, steadfast, he is fit for immortality, O best of men!
  16. The unreal has no being; the real never ceases to be. The final truth about them both has thus been perceived by the seers of ultimate Reality.
  17. Know That to be indeed indestructible by which all this is pervaded. None can work the destruction of this immutable Being.
  18. These bodies are known to have an end; the dweller in the body is eternal, imperishable, infinite. Therefore, O Bharata, fight!
  19. He who understands him to be the slayer, and he who takes him to be the slain, both fail to perceive the truth. He neither slays nor is slain.
  20. He is never born, nor does he ever die; nor once having been, does he cease to be. Unborn, eternal, everlasting, ancient, he is not slain when the body is slain.
  21. One who knows him to be indestructible, everlasting, unborn, undying, how can that man, O Partha, slay or cause anyone to slay ?
  22. As a man casting off worn-out garments takes other new ones, so the dweller in the body casting off worn-out bodies takes others that are new.
  23. Weapons cannot cleave him, nor fire burn him; water cannot wet him, nor wind dry him away.
  24. He is uncleavable; he cannot be burned; he cannot be wetted, nor yet can he be dried. He is eternal, all-pervading, stable, immovable, ever the same.
  25. He is declared to be unmanifest, unthinkable, unchangeable; therefore knowing him as such you should not grieve.
  26. Even if you think of him as constantly taking birth and constantly dying, even then, O mighty-armed, you should not grieve like this.
  27. Certain indeed is death for the born and certain is birth for the dead; therefore over the inevitable you should not grieve.
  28. Creatures are unmanifest in the beginning, manifest in the middle state and unmanifest again at the end, Oh Bharata! What grief is there in this?
  29. One sees him as a wonder, another likewise speaks of him as a wonder, and as a wonder another hears of him. Yet even on (seeing, speaking and hearing) some do not understand him.
  30. He who dwells in the body of everyone is eternal and invulnerable, O Bharata; therefore you should not grieve for any creature whatsoever.
  31. Even if you consider your own dharma you should not waver, for there is nothing better for a kshatriya than a battle in accord with dharma.
  32. Happy are the kshatriyas, O Partha, who find, unsought, such a battle - an open door to heaven.
  33. Now, if you do not engage in this battle, which is in accord with dharma, then casting away your own dharma and good fame, you will incur sin.
  34. Moreover men will ever tell of your disgrace, and to a man of honour ill fame is worse than death.
  35. The great warriors will think you fled from battle out of fear, and they who held you in esteem will belittle you.
  36. Your enemies will speak many ill words of you and will deride your strength. What greater pain than this!
  37. Slain, you will reach heaven; victorious, you will enjoy the earth. Therefore, O son of Kunti, stand up, resolved to fight!
  38. Having gained equanimity in pleasure and pain, in gain and loss, in victory and defeat, then come out to fight. Thus you will not incur sin.
  39. This which has been set before you is understanding in terms of Sankhya; hear it now in terms of Yoga. Your intellect established through it, O Partha, you will cast away the binding influence of action.
  40. In this (Yoga) no effort is lost and no obstacle exists. Even a little of this dharma delivers from great fear.
  41. In this Yoga, O joy of the Kurus, the resolute intellect is one-pointed, but many-branched and endlessly diverse are the intellects of the irresolute.
  42. The undiscerning who are engrossed in the letter of the Veda, O Partha, and declare that there is nothing else, speak flowery words.
  43. Filled with desires, with heaven as their goal, (their words) proclaim birth as the reward of action and prescribe many special rites for the attainment of enjoyment and power.
  44. The resolute state of intellect does not arise in the mind of those who are deeply attached to enjoyment and power and whose thought is captivated by those (flowery words).
  45. The Vedas' concern is with the three gunas. Be without the three gunas, O Arjuna, freed from duality, ever firm in purity, independent of possessions, possessed of the Self.
  46. To the enlightened brahmin all the Vedas are of no more use then is a small well in a place flooded with water on every side.
  47. You have control over action alone, never over its fruits. Live not for the fruits of action, nor attach yourself to inaction.
  48. Established in Yoga, O winner of wealth, perform actions having abandoned attachment and having become balanced in success and failure, for balance of mind is called Yoga.
  49. Far away, indeed, from the balanced intellect is the action devoid of greatness, O winner of wealth. Take refuge in the intellect. Pitiful are those who live for the fruits (of action).
  50. He whose intellect is united (with the Self) casts off both good and evil even here. Bởivậy, ngươi hãy đểhết tâmtrí vào Yoga. Yoga là kỹnăng tại hành.
  51. The wise, their intellect truly united with the Self, having renounced the fruits born of their actions and being liberated from the bonds of birth, arrive at a state devoid of suffering.
  52. When your intellect crosses the mire of delusion, then will you gain indifference to what has been heard and what is yet to be heard.
  53. When your intellect, bewildered by Vedic texts, shall stand unshaken, steadfast in the Self, then will you attain to Yoga.
  54. Arjuna said: What are the signs of a man whose intellect is steady, who is absorbed in the Self, O Keshava? How does the man of steady intellect speak, how does he sit, how does he walk?
  55. Đấng ThiêngLiêng nói: When a man completely casts off all desires that have gone (deep) into the mind, O Partha, when he is satisfied in the Self through the Self alone, then is he said to be of steady intellect.
  56. He whose mind is unshaken in the midst of sorrows, who amongst pleasures is free from longing, from whom attachment, fear and anger have departed, he is said to be a sage of steady intellect.
  57. He who has no undue fondness towards anything, who neither exults nor recoils on gaining what is good or bad, his intellect is established.
  58. And when such a man withdraws his senses from their objects, as a tortoise draws in its limbs from all sides, his intellect is established.
  59. The objects of sense turn away from him who does not feed upon them, but the taste for them persists. On seeing the Supreme even this taste ceases.
  60. The turbulent senses, O son of Kunti, forcibly carry away the mind even of a discerning man who endeavours (to control them).
  61. Having brought them all under control, let him sit united, looking to Me as Supreme; for his intellect is established whose senses are subdued.
  62. Pondering on objects of the senses, a man develops attachment for them; from attachment springs up desire, and desire gives rise to anger.
  63. From anger arises delusion; from delusion unsteadiness of memory; from unsteadiness of memory destruction of intellect; through the destruction of the intellect he perishes.
  64. But he who is self-disciplined, who moves among the objects of the senses with the senses freed from attachment and aversion and under his own control, he attains to 'grace'.
  65. In 'grace' is born an end to all his sorrows. Indeed the intellect of the man of exalted consciousness soon becomes firmly established.
  66. He who is not established has no intellect, nor has he any steady thought. The man without steady thought has no peace; for one without peace how can there be happiness?
  67. When a man's mind is governed by any of the wandering senses, his intellect is carried away by it as a ship by the wind on water.
  68. Therefore he whose senses are all withdrawn from their objects, O mighty-armed, his intellect is established.
  69. That which is night for all beings, therein the self-controlled is awake. That wherein beings are awake is night for the sage who sees.
  70. He whom all desires enter as waters enter the ever-full and unmoved sea attains peace, and not he who cherishes desires.
  71. When a man acts without longing, having relinquished all desires, free from the sense of 'I' and 'mine', he attains to peace.
  72. This is the state of Brahman, O Partha. Having attained it, a man is not deluded. Established in that, even at the last moment, he attains eternal freedom in divine consciousness.