The Computer Revolution/E commerce/Security

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Security Seal[edit]

Security seals (SSLs) are issued by the Certificate Authority. An SSL or an EV SSL certificate is designed to show users that the particular website is secure and protected. When performing any financial transactions over the Internet it’s important to make sure that the web page is safe. Security certificates can be accessed by clicking the security icon in the address bar at the top of the web page.

Firefox-SSL-padlock.png


Tips[edit]

With consumers looking to find that “good deal” at times can get carried away and not realize what they bought is not what they are going to get. It is important to know what you are really buying before you submit a payment; a good rule of thumb is “if it’s too good to be true, then it probably isn't.” Websites like e-bay were notorious for the “bait and switch” so as a consumer it is important to do a full research on an item that you are buying before you actually pull the trigger. It is also important to know that some of the reviews on a seller may be fake in order to give the illusion that the seller is “legit.” [1]

If at all possible, pay for your purchase with a credit card. By paying for your online purchases with a credit card, you are protected by the Fair Credit Billing Act. This act allows purchasers to dispute charges (example- never received the ordered item or item was damage in transit). Most credit card companies have zero liability for card holders regarding unauthorized purchases. It is recommend if you have problems with a transactions or purchases online to first contact the merchant. If contacting the site operator does not resolve issue, file a complaint with the • Federal Trade Commission-https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov • State Attorney General-http://www.naag.org • Better Business Bureau-www.bbb.org

  1. Montaldo, Donna L. About.com. 12 04 2012. Print. 25 10 2012.