Technology Supported Learning & Retention/ePortfolio

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ePortfolio


ePortfolio - a collection of products and processes selected and organized to highlight specific aspects of the portfolio creator and his or her work

Learning outcomes

  • products - may contain photos, graphics, videos, written narratives and hypertext
  • process - use technology to create, collect, organize, present, distribute
  • literacy - competence

Consideration

  • scope - course, school, lifelong
  • audience - faculty, classmates, employers
  • duration
  • media - hosted service, removable media DVD
  • reflection - personal information, privacy

Infrastructure requirements

  • digital repository - content organization, management, access control
  • content creation - applications, hardware
  • media reformat
  • instruction - why, what, how
  • support

Assessment: Student Portfolios

A student portfolio is a collection of products and processes selected and organized to highlight specific aspects of the portfolio creator and his or her work. What goes into the portfolio depends on its purpose and usually includes reflection on the materials included and the portfolio as a whole. Portfolios may be required for a course, a major, or a career goal. Electronic portfolios may contain photos, graphics, videos, written narratives and hypertext links to organize the material.

The links provide information on portfolio development and examples of student portfolios. The links in the section on electronic portfolios could prove useful to students as they develop their own portfolios. http://fod.msu.edu/OIR/Assessment/portfolios.asp


NLIEE Report on the Use of ePortfolios in Higher Education

This white-paper is an overview of ePortfolio implementation. Three types of e-portfolios are described in this report: student e-portfolios, teaching e-portfolios, and institutional e-portfolios. E-portfolios can support student advisement, career preparation, and credential documentation; the sharing of teaching philosophies and practices; department and program self-studies; and institutional and program accreditation processes. This report defines and categorizes e-portfolios, offers examples of higher education e-portfolio implementations, reviews e-portfolio technology, and addresses adoption issues. http://connect.educause.edu/library/abstract/AnOverviewofEPortfol/39335


Becta Research Report http://partners.becta.org.uk/index.php?section=rh&catcode=_re_rp_02&rid=14007

Helen Barrett, E-Portfolios for Learning Helen Barrett links to and discusses the Becta report, Impact study of e-portfolios on learning , and in particular, displays an interesting graphic of “the three distinct components of an e-portfolio system: the digital archive (repository of evidence), tools to support different processes, and different presentation portfolios developed for different purposes and audiences.” http://electronicportfolios.org/blog/2007/07/becta-research-report.html