NiwEnglisc/Level I/Freeteid

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50%.svg Lessons
100 percents.svg Level I
100 percents.svg 1.00 Introduction
S1.01 ~ Starting Point
100 percents.svg 1.01 Hu hattest þu? (T·TA)
100 percents.svg 1.02 Freeteid (T·TA)
100 percents.svg 1.03 Fode (T·TA)
25%.svg Review 1.01
S1.02 ~ Lunden, England
100 percents.svg 1.04 Klaðung (T·TA)
75%.svg 1.05 Folk und Familie (T·TA)
50%.svg 1.06 Scole (T·TA)
25%.svg Review 1.02
S1.03 ~ Cardiff, Wales
25%.svg 1.07 Þe Freols (T·TA)
25%.svg 1.08 Privileg and Þeȝnung (T·TA)
25%.svg 1.09 Wedder (T·TA)
25%.svg Review 1.03
S1.04 ~ Edwinsburg, Scotland
00%.svg 1.10 To Huse Etten (T·TA)
00%.svg 1.11 Filme (T·TA)
00%.svg 1.12 Þat Hus (T·TA)
00%.svg Review 1.04
talk : pagelevel one
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(PDF) Learning the Englisc Language (print)

GrammarAppendicesAboutQ&APlanning
Lessons : Levels : 50%.svg One25%.svg Two25%.svg Three00%.svg Four00%.svg Five

Lesson 2 ~Freeteid

Dialogue[edit]

"Freeteid" means "Free time". This dialog is of Franz and Greta familiarizing each other with their sports activities.

Englisc Dialogue • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •456 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg Sports and time Flag of Scotland.svg Sport and Teid Flag of Ireland.svg
Franz Hallo, Greta! Hu læt is it?
Greta Es is Fierðel ær þrie.
Franz Soðes? Ic pleȝe um þrie Fotball. Makst þu Sport, Greta?
Greta Na, ic em slæk. Ic ga nu to Huse.
Franz Fotball makþ huru Bliþs!
Greta Oþ þann.
Franz Wes hale!

Sports and Activities[edit]

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •356 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg Sports and activities Flag of Scotland.svg Sport and Aktivitæten Flag of Ireland.svg
English Englisc
sport(s) Sport
interests, hobbies, activities Hobbys
football/soccer Fotball
American football Football (spoken as in English)
volleyball Volleyball
basketball Basketball
tennis Tennis
baseball Baseball (spoken as in English)
9-pin bowling Kegeln
chess Raafgamen
board game þat Bordgamen
game þat Gamen
homework Husniede (pl.)
television þat Fernsien/þe Fernseer
movie þe Film

Section Problems>>

Pleȝen, Maken and Other Verbs[edit]

All three verbs that you were introduced to in Lesson 1 are irregular in some way; however, most verbs are regular verbs. The following is a table of the endings you add to the stems of regular verbs to conjugate them:


Englisc Verb • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •168 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg conjugation Flag of Scotland.svg Konjugation Flag of Ireland.svg
Singular Plural
first person ic -e wiȝ
second person þu -st ȝiȝ
third person he hje
scie
it


For example, the verbs pleȝen and maken,

Englisc Verb • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •187 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg to play Flag of Scotland.svg pleȝen Flag of Ireland.svg
Singular Plural
first person ic pleȝe wiȝ pleȝþ
second person þu pleȝst ȝiȝ pleȝþ
third person he pleȝþ hje pleȝþ
scie pleȝþ
it pleȝþ
Englisc Verb • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •152 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg to do_make Flag of Scotland.svg maken Flag of Ireland.svg
Singular Plural
first person ich make wiȝ makþ
second person þu makst ȝiȝ makþ
third person he makþ hje makþ
scie makþ
it makþ

Applications[edit]

  • Hwat dœst þu?
What are you doing?
  • Ic pleȝe Basketball.
I play basketball.
  • Pleȝst þu Fotball?
Do you play soccer?
  • Ic make Husniede.
I do homework.
  • He makþ Husniede.
He does homework.
  • Makst þu Sport?
Do you play sports?

Note the last sentence. In English one plays sport, while in Englisc one does sport. You can also use the w-words from Lesson 1 to make some more combinations:

  • Hwy pleȝst þu Baseball?
Why do you play baseball?
  • Hwa hæfþ Husniede?
Who has homework?

To say "not", use "ne" before the verb. "Nan" is another word to emphasize that you play none of a sport, and declines like an does.

  • Hwa ne pleȝþ Fotball?
Who doesn't play soccer?
  • Wiȝ pleȝeþ nanen Tennis.
We don't play tennis.

Compound Sentences[edit]

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •72 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg Conjunctions Flag of Scotland.svg Fœgunge Flag of Ireland.svg
English Englisc
and and
but ak
or oþþe


Both Englisc and English have compound sentences; the applications of these are enormous. They can be used in lists, but also in compound sentences. For example,

  • Ic pleȝe Basketball and he pleȝþ eak Basketball.
I play basketball, and he also plays basketball.

The new word, "eak", is very important and it means "also". The one grammar rule about "eak" is that it always comes after the verb.

Section Problems>>

Other Verbs and Their Conjugations[edit]

Englisc Grammar • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •135 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg Verbs Flag of Scotland.svg Verben Flag of Ireland.svg
Englisc English
ræden to read
lesen to gather
bescawen to watch
seen to see
wœrken to work
wreiten to write
finden to find
swimmen to swim


Bescawen, wreiten, and swimmen are all regular verbs, they follow normal conjugations. To conjugate, you first remove the ' en ', then add the correct ending, here is an example,

Verb First Step Finished
swimmen swimm ich swimme
  • Finden is an irregular verb; however, it has a simple change. Whenever the verb ends with a consonant cluster like "nd", an 'e' is added before it. So it would be du findest, not du findst. As well as he, scie, it, and ȝiȝ findeþ, not he, scie, it, and ȝiȝ findþ.
  • Lesen is also an irregular verb. First, when forming "þu" it is liest and with "he, scie, it" it is liesþ.
  • Seen is the last irregular verb. When forming "þu" it is siehst and with "he, scie, it" it is siehþ.

Section Problems>>

Two More Verb Forms[edit]

There are two more verb forms in English that you will learn this lesson: the present progressive ("I am playing, he is making"), and the affirmative "I do play, he does not play", which includes a form of 'to do'.

It might be tempting to make the present progressive sentence, "I am playing." into "Ic em pleȝen.". After all, 'pleȝen' sounds a lot like 'play-ing', but that is not the definition. 'Pleȝen' means 'to play', which makes "Ic em pleȝen." into "I am to play.", not at all what you are trying to say, and a collection of words that does not make sense. So it is not "Ic em pleȝen."

The second phrase, "I do play", is another tricky one. This one may seem like, "Ic do pleȝen." But don't forget, there are no helping verbs in Englisc. "Ic do pleȝen." just doesn't work.

Both of the phrases above are simplified in Englisc. Instead of "I am playing." and "I do play.", Englisc makes them both simply: "Ic pleȝe." When using 'not', instead of "does not play", you get "Ic ne pleȝe". This may sound like old English, and there you see where English came from, and why it is called a "Germanic" language.

Section Problems>>

Expressing likes and dislikes[edit]

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (how to upload)
Flag of England.svg Expressing likes and dislikes Flag of Scotland.svg Verbindungen Flag of Ireland.svg
English Englisc
I like... Ic habe ... ȝorn
I like to play... Ic pleȝe ȝorn...
What do you like? Hwat hæfst þu ȝorn?

* I like ... also translates to: Ic ann. Unnen being the root verb, to like. What do you like? translates to: Hwat annst þu? Ic ann, þu annst, he/scie/it ann, wiȝ unneþ, ȝiȝ unneþ, hje unneþ.


In Englisc, there are several ways to express likes and dislikes. This way is a casual way. You can also add other verbs for other things, like asking or saying if they like to play, or make things.

  • To express preference, use liefer instead of ȝorn. For example, "Wiȝ pleȝeþ liefer Fotball."
  • To express favorites, you use am liefsten, meaning "most of all", in the same context as liefer. For example, "Ic pleȝe am liefsten Raafgamen.".
  • To express dislikes, use ne ȝorn instead of ȝorn.

Section Problems>>

Numbers[edit]

The first big unit in this level is time, which we are just about to get to. German time is very much like English time. However, we must begin with Englisc numbers.

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •536 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg Numbers Flag of Scotland.svg Zahlen Flag of Ireland.svg
English Englisc
zero null
one aan
two tweȝn
three þrie
four fier
five feif
six six
seven sefen
eight aht
nine niȝn
ten tien
eleven endlefen
twelve twelf
thirteen þrietien
fourteen fiertien
fifteen feiftien
sixteen sixtien
seventeen sefentien
eighteen ahttien
nineteen niȝntien
twenty tweȝntiȝ
thirty þrittiȝ
forty fiertiȝ
fifty feiftiȝ
sixty sixtiȝ
seventy sefentiȝ
eighty ahttiȝ
ninety niȝntiȝ
hundred hundred/hund
hundred and one hundredaan
hundred and ten endlefentiȝ
hundred and twenty twelftiȝ
thousand þusend
1001 þusendaan
1101 þusendaanhundaan
3000 þrieþusend
200 000 twahundþusend


  • Above are some basic numbers in Englisc. If you haven't noticed the pattern, "-tien" creates "-teen" and "-tiȝ" creates "-ty."
  • The numerals, when written as figures, appear the same in Englisc and English, but when spoken or written in full, the units normally come before the tens. They are connected by and.

for example, "aanandfeiftiȝ", which is 51, from "aan" and "feiftiȝ".

  • In spoken words, "twa" can be used for "tweȝn", used before a hundred or a thousand.

Section Problems>>

Time[edit]

Asking the Time[edit]

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •243 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg Time Flag of Scotland.svg Teid Flag of Ireland.svg
English Englisc
What time is it? (How late is it?) Hu læt is it?
What time is it? (How much clock is it?) Hu fele Uhr is it?
Ef It is 10:15 Nu is tien Uhr feiftien.
BoA It is 10:15 Fierðel æfter Tien
BoA It is 10:45 Fierðel ær Endlefen


In table above you might have seen the Ef and BoA, those stand for exact form and before or after. Specific times can be expressed in two ways: Exact form (e.g. "Four thirty-seven") or before or after form (e.g. "Twenty-three to five").

Exact form[edit]

This form is the same as English. For example,

  • It is tien Uhr feiftien.
It is 10:15 a.m.
  • The new word Uhr means "o'clock", and is used in all exact times, it comes between the hour and the minute.
  • Also, Englisc-speakers generally use the 24-hour clock when expressing time this way, therefore, 3:29 p.m. (15:29) is "feiftien Uhr niȝnandtweȝntiȝ."

Section Problems>>

Before or After the Hour[edit]

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •111 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg BoA Flag of Scotland.svg BoA Flag of Ireland.svg
English Englisc
After, Past æfter
Till, to ær
quarter Fierðel
half before Half


  • Use the same form as in English. For example, 10:57 can be said as, "þrie ær Endlefen(three minutes to eleven". Likewise, 4:10 would be "tien æfter Fier(ten minutes past four)."
  • Typically, use the smaller time interval with 'æfter' or 'ær'. Don't say, "sefenandfeiftig æfter Tien."
  • You don't need a ær when using half. For example, 11:30 can be said as, "Half twelf" and 5:15 can be said as "Fierðel æfter Feif", 5:45 would be "Fierðel ær Six".

Note: This is only used with informal time telling. You don't use 'Uhr'.

Section Problems>>

Saying When You Do Something[edit]

Hwann pleȝst þu Football? (Football means American Football. Soccer would be "Fotball", which lit. means Football)

To say you play a sport at a certain time in English, you would answer, "I play football at 3:30." This is all the same in Englisc, with the translation of 'at' being um. That makes the above response "Ic pleȝe Football um half Fier." or "Ic pleȝe Football um feiftien Uhr þrittiȝ.".

Section Problems>>

Other Time[edit]

Times of Day[edit]

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •364 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg Times of Day Flag of Scotland.svg Dæȝesteide Flag of Ireland.svg
English Englisc
the day þe Dæȝ
today todæȝ
tomorrow morgen
the day after tomorrow ofermorgen
yesterday ȝestern
the day before yesterday ærȝestern
(early) morning Ærmorgen*
morning undern
afternoon Ofernon
evening Æfen
night Niht

*In Englisc, the words for "morning" and "tomorrow" are almost the same: morgen and to-morgen. If you want to say tomorrow morning use on morgen (meaning: in the morning) instead of tomorgen morgen.

  • The words above can be combined into phrases like "ȝestern Æfen".

Section Problems>>

Days and Months[edit]

English Englisc
Monday Monendæȝ/Mondæȝ
Tuesday Tiwsdæȝ
Wednesday Wodensdæȝ
Thursday Þunersdæȝ
Friday Friȝdæȝ
Saturday Sæterndæȝ
Sunday Sonndæȝ/Sonnendæȝ


Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •328 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg Months Flag of Scotland.svg Monþe Flag of Ireland.svg
English Englisc
January Wintermonþ
February Solmonþ
March Hreþmonþ
April Eastermonþ
May Þrimilcemonþ
June Seremonþ
July Mædmonþ
August Weedmonþ
September Haliȝmonþ
October Winterfylleþ
November Blotmonþ
December Ȝolmonþ
  • To say "on Monday", say "am Monendæȝ" or whatever applies. To say "in January", say "im Wintermonþ" or whatever applies. This is the same for all of the days and months.
  • You can also combine the times of day from earlier with the days of the week. But they're both nouns. To do this, therefore, we must combine the two words into one, as in "Tiwsniht" (Tuesday night) and "Wodensæfen" (Wednesday evening).

Culture Note: The Englisc week begins on Monday.

Section Problems>>

Dates[edit]

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •305 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg Dates Flag of Scotland.svg Daten Flag of Ireland.svg
English German
first of (month) ærste
second of (month) oðer
third of (month) þridder
fourth of (month) fierþe
seventh of (month) sefenþe
eighth of (month) ahtþr
-th of [below 20] -þe
tenth of tienþ
twentieth of tweȝntigþe
thirty-first of aanandþrittiȝþe
-th of [20 to 31] -þe
on (the) am
  • The ordinal numbers from 2 to 19 take the endings þ/t and from 20 upwards take the ending þ
  • For example "on the 25th of December",
Simply say "am feifandtweȝntiȝþen Ȝolmonþ."
In other cases you say "feifandtweȝntiȝþe' Ȝolmonþ" or "þe feifandtweȝntiȝþe'e Ȝolmonþ".
  • In Englisc, dates are written out in the logical order Month . Day . Year, instead of the American Month/Day/Year.
Engliscuses a dot or a dash instead of a slash. Do not use the slash in dates, as it is unusual and confusing because you cannot tell if "4/6" means 4th of June (4.6.) or 6th of April (6.4.)

Section Problems>>

Birthdays[edit]

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (info •237 kb • help)
Flag of England.svg Birthdays Flag of Scotland.svg Gebyrddage Flag of Ireland.svg
English German
Birthday Gebyrddæȝ
Happy Birthday Alle Gode tom Gebyrddæȝ!
Best wishes on your birthday! Gesælige Wyscunge tom Gebyrddæȝ!
Here is your present! Hier is þeine Gife!
Thank you! Þankewell!
That's a nice party! Þat is ane tolle Party!
  • To say, "My birthday is on November 13th", say, "Ic habe am þrietienþen Blotmonþ Gebyrddæȝ."

Here am þrietienþen Blotmonþ , am 13. Blotmonþ, am þrietienþen elfþen (a shorter version of endlefenþen) and am 13. 11. represent the same date.

Note the order; it translates back literally as "I have on the 13th of November birthday."

Section Problems>>

Seasons[edit]

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (how to upload)
Flag of England.svg Seasons Flag of Scotland.svg Ȝearsteide Flag of Ireland.svg
English Englisc
Spring Lenkten
Summer Summer
Autumn Hærfest
Winter Winter
in (the) im

To say "in Summer", say "im Summer". For example,

  • Im Summer pleȝe ic Baseball.
I play baseball in summer.

The time always goes before the verb and the subject. (time, verb, and subject)

Section Problems>>

Periods of Time[edit]

If you want to express a certain period of time, but it doesn't have a specific name, like Ofernon, you can do it like this:,

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (how to upload)
Flag of England.svg Seasons Flag of Scotland.svg Ȝearsteide Flag of Ireland.svg
Englisc Time
of Starting Time
Ending Time
  • This is the same as from ... till ... in English.
  • This can also apply with dates. For example, "Wiȝ habeþ Scole (school) of Monenedæȝ oþ Friȝedæȝ".
  • Exceptions
Wiȝ habeþ free of þem feifandtweȝntiȝþen Ȝolmonþ oþ þem oðern Wintermonþ.

Section Problems>>

How often?[edit]

Hu oft?, there are many ways to answer this question. Two are "once, twice, or three times in a ..." or "always, often, or never."

A Number or Times[edit]

To say, "once a month", or "four times a week", add "seiðe(n)" to the end of the number and use the examples below.

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (how to upload)
Flag of England.svg Daily Flag of Scotland.svg Dæȝlic Flag of Ireland.svg
English Englisc
Day am Dæȝ
Week in þer Wuke
Month im Monþ
Year im Ȝear
Weekend am Wukenende
Morning morgens
Evening æfens
Afternoon ofernons
Night nihtes oþþe in þer Niht

For example

  • Wiȝ kegelþ tweȝnseiðen in þer Woche.
We bowl twice a week.

Section Problems>>

Common Adverbs[edit]

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (how to upload)
Flag of England.svg Sometimes Flag of Scotland.svg Hweilen Flag of Ireland.svg
English Englisc
always allteids
most of the time mæstens
often oft
sometimes hweilen
seldom selden
never næfre
only aanen
  • To apply these words, put them in the sentence, after the verb and subject, but before the sport/activity.
  • You can also use 'aanen' to say things like, Scie pleȝþ aanen hweilen Tennis.
  • Note that if this is translated word-for-word, it becomes, She plays only sometimes tennis. That's just the way Englisc is.

Section Problems>>

Time-Related Words[edit]

Englisc Vocabulary • Freeteid • Gnome-speakernotes.pngaudio (how to upload)
Flag of England.svg Sometimes Flag of Scotland.svg Hweilen Flag of Ireland.svg
English Englisc
Time þie Teid
Free time þie Freeteid
  • To say you have time, ignore the 'die'.
  • To say when, insert other phrases you have learned this lesson. For example, Ic habe am Sæternsæfen Teid.
Note that the word order is the same as that of birthdays. You can use Freeteid in the same way.

Section Problems>>

What's On the Test[edit]

To go straight to the lesson test, go here.

Q&ALevel One 50%.svgLevel Two 00%.svgLevel Three 25%.svgLevel Four 00%.svgLevel Five 00%.svgPlanning


Level One 75%.svg : 1.00 Introduction 100 percents.svgSection 1 ~ Starting Point : 1.01 Hu hattest þu? 100 percents.svg1.02 Freizeit 100 percents.svg1.03 Ettung 100 percents.svgReview 1.01 25%.svgSection 2 ~ Lunden, England : 1.04 Klaðung 100 percents.svg1.05 Folk und Familie 75%.svg1.06 Scole 50%.svgReview 1.02 25%.svgSection 3 ~ Edwinsburg, Scotland : 1.07 Þat Freols 25%.svg1.08 Privileg and Þeȝnung 25%.svg1.09 Wedder 25%.svgReview 1.03 25%.svgSection 4 ~ Cardiff, Wales: 1.10 To Huse Etten 00%.svg1.11 Filme 00%.svg1.12 Þat Hus 00%.svgReview 1.04 00%.svg
Level Two 00%.svg : 2.00 Introduction 00%.svgSection 1 ~ Dublin, Irland: 2.01 Fœdnes e:00%.png]] • 2.02 Diere 00%.svg2.03 Kommunikation 00%.svgWiederholung 2.01 00%.svgSection 2 ~ Oxenford, England: 2.04 Kultur 00%.svg2.05 Nese 00%.svg2.06 Hælþ 00%.svgEdhwierfung 2.02 00%.svgSection 3 ~ Birminghaam, England: 2.07 Þie World 00%.svg2.08 An Fare 00%.svg2.09 List 00%.svgEdhwierfung 2.03 00%.svgSection 4 ~ Dresden, Germany: 2.10 Scole 00%.svg2.11 Wolkniȝ, Stormiȝ, Fræken 00%.svg2.12 Naturwittenscipe 00%.svgEdhwierfung 2.04 00%.svg

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