Microsoft Office/Create a Newsletter

From Wikibooks, open books for an open world
Jump to: navigation, search

Vocabulary[edit]

  • Nameplate - The top portion of the first page of the document, contains the name of the newsletter and issue information.
  • Issue Information Line - A line of text across the top of a newsletter that give what volume, month/year, or issue this newsletter is for.
  • Ruling Lines - Horizontal lines in a document. You have seen this as in college or wide ruled paper.
  • Vertical Rule - Lines you place in a document that go vertically
  • Subhead - Names given to different parts of a document such as UPCOMING EVENTS, or NEXT ISSUE
  • Pull-quote - Text that is pulled from the main part of a document and placed in a text box or other graphical emphasis to draw a readers attention.
  • Wrap Around Text - Text that wraps around an object such as a graphic or text box
  • Run-Around - The space that is between the text and the object
  • Gradient - Using two colors, or two shades of the same hue and having them blend into one another. Example of turning from blue to green.
  • Inline Object - An object such as a graphic that is part of a paragraph. The text is inline with the graphic and a large space is left.
  • Floating Object - An object such as a graphic or text box that can be positioned anywhere on a page, in front of text, or behind it.
  • Justified - When a paragraph is lined up at the right and left margin and spaces are added between words as needed. This is most often seen on the edges of a newspaper, or magazine column.
  • Drop Cap - The first character of a paragraph that is larger and Capital. It usually spans two or three rows. It can also be of a different font.
  • Column Break - A break that tells word that the document in that column will continue on the next page. This is generally used with a next page section break.
  • Source Object - The object that is being copied
  • Destination Object - The object being pasted
  • Paste Special Command - Allows you to link the source and destination objects together. If the source object changes the destination object will change as well.
  • Diagram - A graphic display of information such as an organizational chart, pyramid, radial chart, target chart, or Venn diagram

Lesson[edit]

Set Margins[edit]

  • Go to the Page Layout Tab
  • Go to the Page Setup Group
  • Click on the Margins drop down
  • Click on NARROW 0.5 for top, bottom, left and right

Create a Nameplate[edit]

Using Word Art[edit]

  • Create the title
    • Go to the Insert tab
    • Go to the Text group
    • Click on the WordArt drop down
    • Click on one of the straight types in the gallery
    • Type in Mouse Madness for the name of the newsletter
    • Pick a style of font
    • Click on B for bold
    • Click OK
  • Format the title
    • Right Click on the WordArt
    • Click on the Fill Effects button
    • Play with the colors, shading styles, and variants
    • Click on OK
    • Click on the Size tab
    • Change the Rotation
    • Click ok and look at your masterpiece
  • Change the shape of the WordArt
    • Go to the WordArt Tools
    • Go to the Format Tab
    • Go to the WordArt Styles
    • Click on the Change Shape Drop Down
    • Hover over the shapes in the gallary and choose one you like

Adding Ruling Lines[edit]

Click on the WordArt title you just created to select it.

  • Go to the HOME tab
  • Go to the Paragraph group
  • Click on the border drop down
  • Click on the Borders and Shading option
  • Choose Style of border you want
  • Choose the color of border you want
  • Choose the thickness of border you want
  • Click on the edges of the preview diagram to choose where the border should be, for this part we want it above the WordArt.

Adding an Issue Information Line[edit]

  • Double click on Equation
  • type: Monthly Newsletter

Setting Tab Stops[edit]

  • Go to the HOME tab
  • Go to the Paragraph group and click on the dialog box launcher
  • Click on the TAB button in the lower left of the dialog box
  • In the Tab Stop Position type: 7.5
  • Click on the radio button for alignment - RIGHT
  • Make sure the radio button for Leader is NONE
  • Click on SET
  • Click on OK
  • Press Tab and type: Vol. 1

Placing a Symbol in a document[edit]

  • Go to the INSERT Tab
  • Go to the SYMBOLS group
  • Click on the Symbols drop down
  • Click on More Symbols
  • Scroll until you find a symbol you want to place for a spacer between your volume and issue numbers.
  • Click on the Symbol
  • Click on Insert
  • click on CLOSE

Finish typing the volume and issue, type: Issue 1

Working with a Floating Graphic[edit]

  • Go to the INSERT tab
  • Click on the Illustrations Group
  • Click on Clip Art
  • Search for a computer mouse that has a tail
  • Click on the mouse you want from the gallery of clip art
  • Use the resize handles to make it a smaller size and fit with your Word Art
  • Right Click the mouse
  • Click on Text Wrapping
  • Click on Behind Text
  • Click and drag the mouse so that the cable looks like it is plugged into one of the letters of the WordArt

Place a Bottom Border[edit]

  • Select the Monthly Newsletter Issue Line
  • Go to the HOME tab
  • Go to the Paragraph group
  • Click on the border dropdown
  • Click on Borders and Shading
  • Use the same type of border from above the WordArt but place it below the diagram

Format the Main Article of a Newsletter[edit]

Add an Article Title[edit]

  • Click twice on the line after the bottom border
  • type: What Is A Virus
  • Press Enter

Add a Continuous Section Break[edit]

  • Go to the PAGE LAYOUT tab
  • Go to the PAGE SETUP group
  • Click on the Breaks drop down
  • Go to the Section Breaks group
  • Click on Continuous

Place the text of the article[edit]

  • Copy the article below:

A virus is a malicious computer program or programming code that replicates by infecting files, installed software or removable media. A virus usually carries a destructive payload, which varies depending on the virus author’s intentions. A typical virus infects, corrupts or deletes files and folders, damages the system, drops other dangerous parasites, steals or discloses user sensitive information. Extremely dangerous viruses can also wipe out all the data from hard disks and even severely damage certain computer hardware devices.

By replication approaches viruses are divided into three main categories:

  1. parasites called file infectors are designed to propagate by infecting or corrupting various files;
  2. threats known as boot record infectors spread through removable media containing infected executable code and insert themselves into the master boot record (MBR) on hard disks;
  3. widely spread macro viruses affect certain applications such as Microsoft Word or Microsoft Excel and infect documents that can contain macros.

Some viruses do not belong to any of these categories, as they combine features and functions specific to more than one virus type. Such threats, sometimes called hybrid viruses, can infect both files and master boot record and replicate by attaching malicious code to user documents. These parasites are very difficult to completely get rid of, as they usually consist of several components, which automatically reinstall each other after the user have found and removed few of them.

Many viruses have extra features, which allow them to escape detection by antivirus software. Such threats use several approaches to stay hidden. Some of them, known as stealth viruses, monitor antivirus software activity and intercept its requests to the operating system. When the antivirus attempts to check an infected file, the virus immediately passes the original clean variant of that file, so the antivirus is unable to find any malicious code in it. Other parasites, called polymorphic viruses, are able to mutate continuously modifying their code, so that two files infected by the same pest have no common parts. Polymorphic viruses are extremely difficult to detect.

Change the number of columns[edit]

  • Select the text of the articles
  • Go to the PAGE LAYOUT tab
  • Go to the PAGE SETUP group
  • Click on the COLUMNS drop down
  • Click on THREE

Justify a Paragraph[edit]

  • Select all the text of the article
  • Go to the HOME tab
  • Go to the PARAGRAPH group
  • Click on the JUSTIFY button

Format a Drop Cap[edit]

  • Select the A from the first letter of the first paragraph
  • Go to the Insert tab
  • Go to the Text group
  • Click on the Drop Cap tab
  • Select Dropped
  • Change the font style and color from the HOME tab

Insert a Column Break[edit]

  • Send the rest of the document to the next page
    • Click in front of "Many", the first word of the last paragraph of column two.
    • Go to the PAGE LAYOUT tab
    • Go to the PAGE SETUP group
    • Click on the BREAKS drop down
    • Go to the SECTIONS group
    • Click on NEXT PAGE
  • Go to the next column
    • Go to the PAGE LAYOUT tab
    • Go to the PAGE SETUP group
    • Click on the BREAKS drop down
    • Go to the PAGE BREAK group
    • Click on COLUMN

Insert a file into a column[edit]

  • Copy the following document into the third column

Next Meeting:
Feb 20th in the Business Lab
3:30 – 4:30

Special Meeting:
Feb 15 in the Multi-Purpose Room

A light snack will be provided, and a guest speaker will come to take about and answer all your questions to do with what happens now that I have a virus?
If you plan on attending please send an email message to tec_club@gmail.com. The cost of the session is $10 per person to be paid at the door.

Next issue
What a virus does.
Examples of viruses

Format a Vertical Rule[edit]

Create a Pull Quote[edit]

Format a Second Page of a Newsletter[edit]

Add a Continuous Section Break[edit]

Create a Page 2 Header Section[edit]

Link a Copied Item[edit]

Balancing Columns[edit]

Create a Diagram - Organizational Chart[edit]

Format and Design[edit]

Color a drop cap[edit]

Add a page boarder[edit]

Highlight Text[edit]

Animate Text[edit]

Change background color[edit]

Format Background pattern[edit]

Save a document as a web page[edit]

Project[edit]

Pick a category for a newsletter: Vet Office, City Council, Horse Training, Snowboarding, ...
The newsletter must contain:

  • two pages
  • three columns
  • pull quote
  • diagram/organizational chart
  • page border
  • separate column on front page for current or upcoming events
  • at least one article that fills the text part of the document, use more if you need to fill up the space

Rubric[edit]

Newsletter Rubric
Standards 1 point 2 points 3 points 4 points 5 points
Creates a Nameplate with an appropriate title for category Is missing four or more items Is missing three items Is missing two items Is missing one items Includes newsletter name, Monthly Newsletter, Vol #, Issue #, a graphic, and is visually appealing
Creates a heading for each article and matches fonts Four sections do not match fonts, or is missing a heading Three sections do not match fonts, or is missing a heading Two sections do not match fonts, or is missing a heading One section does not match fonts, or is missing a heading All fonts match for regular text and for headings. Each article in the newsletter has a heading, and each section in the current events section on the first page has a heading.
Creates a Pull Quote Finds a quote in one of the articles. Creates a text box for the quote. Finds a quote in one of the articles. Creates a text box for the quote. Formats the text box to match the style or format of the rest of the newsletter. Finds a quote in one of the articles. Creates a text box for the quote. Formats the text box to match the style and format of the rest of the newsletter. Finds a quote in one of the articles that would draw the readers attention. Creates a text box for the quote. Formats the text box to match the style and format of the rest of the newsletter. Finds a quote in one of the articles that would draw and catch the readers attention. Creates a text box for the quote. Formats the text box to match the style and format of the rest of the newsletter.
Formatted in three columns with current events section on front page and a page border Creates a newsletter with three columns. Creates a newsletter with three columns and has a page border. Name plate is one column. Creates the newsletter with three columns. All the pages have a page border. Name plate is one column on both pages. Creates the newsletter with three columns but all of the breaks might not be correct. All the pages have a page border. Name Plate is one column on both pages. Creates section, page, and column breaks correctly to format the newsletter with three columns. The current events section is on the front page. Both pages have a page border that matches the style and format of the rest of the newsletter.
Creates a heading section on page 2 Page two has a name plate section with some of the name of the newsletter, monthly newsletter, issue # and volume #. Page two has a name plate section with most of the name of the newsletter, monthly newsletter, issue # and volume #. Page two has a name plate section with the name of the newsletter, monthly newsletter, issue # and volume #. Page two has a name plate section with the name of the newsletter, monthly newsletter, issue # and volume #. Formatting matches page one's name plate. Page two has a name plate section with the name of the newsletter, monthly newsletter, issue # and volume #. All formatting matches page one's name plate.
Creates a diagram or organizational chart Chart is used to bring attention to some aspect of your newsletter. The formatting fits the rest of the newsletter. Chart is used to bring attention to some aspect of your newsletter. The formatting fits the rest of the newsletter. The fonts are big enough to read easily. Chart is used to bring attention to some aspect of your newsletter. The formatting fits the rest of the newsletter. The fonts are big enough to read easily. Everything is spelled correctly. Chart is used to bring attention to some aspect that your article is discussing. The formatting fits the rest of the newsletter. The fonts are big enough to read easily. Everything is spelled correctly. Chart is used to bring attention to some important aspect that your article is discussing. The formatting fits the rest of the newsletter. The fonts are big enough to read easily. Everything is spelled correctly.
Peer Editing - Has someone peer edit the document and accepts or denies changes as necessary Rarely provides useful ideas. May refuse to participate. Provides work that needs to be checked/redone by others to ensure quality. Rarely provides useful ideas. Provides work that usually needs to be checked/redone by others to ensure quality. Sometimes provides useful ideas. A satisfactory group member who does what is required.Provides work that occasionally needs to be checked/redone by other group members to ensure quality. Usually provides useful ideas. A strong group member who tries hard! Provides high quality work. Routinely provides useful ideas and contributes a lot of effort. Provides work of the highest quality.