Jet Propulsion/Rotors

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The moving parts of the jet engine. The turbomachinery blades are mounted on a number of Rotors.


disks[edit]

The disks provide structural fixing and resist the radial and axial forces generated by the airfoils in the fans. compressors, turbines.

Functional requirements[edit]

Disk Mechanics[edit]

Numerical Design[edit]

Example: 600m/s Tip speed turbine at 200 C[edit]

Centrifugal compressors[edit]

Axial compressor durms and stiffeners[edit]

Fan[edit]

Blade-off failure analysis[edit]

Bird Impact[edit]

Fatigue[edit]

Disk fracture[edit]

Clearance control[edit]

shafts[edit]

Shafts connect the functional parts and transfer forces from turbines to fans and compressors and to bearings.

Torque[edit]

Thrust[edit]

Whirling[edit]

Gyroscopic effects[edit]

Multi shaft Dynamics[edit]

Materials, Manufacturing and Assembly[edit]

bearings[edit]

The rotors are supported on bearings.

Functional requirements[edit]

Loading, Overloading, service life, lubrication

Plain bearings[edit]

Roller and ball bearings[edit]

Air bearings[edit]

Thrust bearings[edit]

Bearing lubrication and cooling[edit]

Seals[edit]

The pressure differentials between different rotating parts are maintained by seals.

Dynamic seals[edit]

Labyrinth Seals[edit]

Brush seals[edit]

Gas Pistons[edit]

Engine force balance[edit]

Takeoff[edit]

Cruise[edit]