Demystifying Depression/List of Figures

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Figure 1: The progression of an individual's maximum normal capacity (in effect how large is the supply of serotonin), and the actual used capacity (how much serotonin is effectively used), during the course of an extended period. Notice that there moments when the demand is higher, perhaps because of extra work, but that the maximum capacity was never breached.
Figure 2: The relationship between adrenaline and cortisol.
Figure 3: The adrenaline response curve for various degrees of depression.
Figure 4: Chronic stress can diminish your maximum normal capacity.
Figure 5: In the last stages of clinical depression, the maximum capacity is virtually nil, and the adrenaline (anxiety) transforms itself into a 'fire'.
Figure 6: The relationship between daily activity and normal capacity in recovery.
Figure 7: The hormetic response curve. Note how small amounts of the stressor event have a positive effect, but which decreases rapidly as the amount increases. Large amounts will actually have a negative effect on the body. (The stressor event can be exercise, radiation, or any other agent for which there is a hormetic response).
Figure 8: The hormetic response curve for a severely depressed individual and for a healthy one.
Figure 9: The maximum normal capacity naturally decreases with age.
Figure 10: The blood pressure response curve for three individuals with varying degrees of a depression.

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