Creating Screencasts/Technical issues

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File Size[edit]

Before starting a screencast, you want to make sure you will have adequate space to store the final video. It's generally a good idea to have at least double the space you think the resulting video will be.

Controlling Video File Size[edit]

Not all these options may be available to you when recording and may instead be hard-coded into the software as presets.

  • Resolution
    • This is the size of your video's width and height in pixels. Generally, more pixels = more memory, so having a larger resolution will result in a larger file size.
  • Capture rate
    • How often a frame (still picture) is recorded. This is usually denoted in milliseconds (ms). A lower capture rate will result in more frames being captured during a given interval of time.
  • Framerate
    • This represents the amount of frames played in a given time period. Usually it is denoted with frames-per-second (fps).
  • Bitrate
    • The maximum amount of data allowed to be recorded at a given time. Usually measured in Kb/S.
  • Compression \ Codecs
    • The encoding scheme used to store the video.
  • Keyframes
    • This stands for whole or complete frames.

Easy on the eyes[edit]

Fullscreen VS region recording. Maintaining a descent file size without sacrificing readability in compression.

Controlling Audio Size[edit]

  • Channels (mono vs stereo)
    • If you're just recording your voice from a microphone, mono (single channel) is recommended.
  • Frequency
    • Measured in Hertz
  • Bitrate
    • The maximum amount of data allowed to be recorded at a given time. Usually measured in Kb/S.
  • Compression
    • The encoding scheme used to store the audio data.