Cookbook:Soy

From Wikibooks, open books for an open world
Jump to: navigation, search
Edamame soybeans
Several varieties of soy

Cookbook | Recipes | Ingredients | Basic foodstuffs | Legume

The Soy bean is a small fat green bean. It is particularly associated with East Asian cuisines, large-scale commercial cooking, meat analogues for vegetarians, and industrial processes. Soy beans may be served uncooked and whole during a Japanese meal. They may be cooked and pressed to yield soy milk, which can then be coagulated to make tofu. They may be fermented to produce soy sauce, natto, miso, and tempeh. Soy beans may be used to produce bean sprouts that are larger than the normal ones produced from mung beans. Soy bean oil has a high smoke point, making it suitable for high-temperature frying.

Edamame[edit]

To eat beans right out of the shell, boil them until they are al dente (still slightly firm). Rinse to cool slightly, and season (salt, generally) as desired. You can easily suck the al dente beans out of the shell. Beans may also be shelled and added to other dishes, such as salads. Beans are easy to shell after they are boiled briefly.