Cookbook:Smoke Point

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Cookbook | Recipes | Ingredients

The smoke point of an oil or fat is the temperature at which it gives off smoke. When oil is smoking, it gives off bad fumes and is prone to bursting into flame. Flames from a pot of burning oil will reach up for 2 or 3 feet. The smoke point of an oil should be high when the oil is used for deep-fat frying or when it will be exposed alone on surfaces such as cookie sheets. The numbers here are common values; oils will vary.

Olive oil is particularly variable; higher quality cold-pressed grades have lower smoke points than cheaper solvent-extracted and refined grades. It is better not to use high-quality olive oil for deep frying—save it for your salads.


Type of oil Smoke Point
°C °F
avocado (mono) 265 510
safflower oil (poly) 237 460
Palm 235 455
soybean oil (poly) 232 450
groundnut fruit (peanut) oil (mono) 226 440
low-erucic acid rapeseed (LEAR, or canola) oil (mono) 226 440
sunflower oil (poly) 226 440
Peanut 225 437
corn oil (poly) 215 420
cottonseed oil (poly) 215 420
grape seed oil 215 420
Safflower (>70% linoleic) 210 410
Safflower (high oleic) 210 410
Canola (rapeseed) 204 400
sesameseed oil 198 390
lard (sat) 193 380
shortening 183 363
butter (sat) 176 350
coconut oil (sat) 176 350
hemp seed oil 170 330
flaxseed oil 107 225
olive oil (mono) 93-207 200-406
cocoa butter (sat)  ?  ?
cream (sat)  ?  ?
margarine (sat)  ?  ?
palm kernel oil (sat)  ?  ?
palm oil (sat)  ?  ?
poultry fat (sat)  ?  ?
suet (beef fat) (sat)  ?  ?