Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...e6/2. d4/2...d5/3. e5

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French Defence: 3.e5
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

rnbqkbnr/ppp2ppp/4p3/3pP3/3P4/8/PPP2PPP/RNBQKBNR

French Defence - Advance Variation[edit]

White gains some space advantage immediately, and prevents Black from developing their king's knight to its most natural square f6.

Because Black's position is somewhat cramped at the moment, he usually decides to undermine White's pawn chain on d4/e5, which hinders Black from developing the pieces of their kingside to good squares. This is typically done by attacking the base of White's pawn chain - d4 - by playing 3...c5.

Theory table[edit]

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation.

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5

3
1 e5
c5
=

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References[edit]

  • Batsford Chess Openings 2 (1989, 1994). Garry Kasparov, Raymond Keene. ISBN 0-8050-3409-9.