Canadian LGBT History/Bill C-150

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The court case of Everett George Klippert caused much discussion of homosexuality among Canadians. In 1965 Everett George Klippert was interrogated by the police as part of an arson investigation in the Northwest Territories. Klippert was arrested after admitting that he had had sex with other men. When psychiatrists determined that he was unlikely to stop having sex with men, he was declared a dangerous offender and sentenced to life in prison. Maclean's, Canada's popular newsweekly, then printed an article sympathetic to homosexuals. This led to increasing calls to reform Canada's law on homosexuality. Klippert was released in 1971.

Same-sex sexual activity was decriminalized in Canada as a result of legislation (Bill C-150 AKA the omnibus bill) introduced in 1967 and passed in 1969 by then-Justice Minister and Attorney General of Canada, Pierre Trudeau (who later became the 15th Prime Minister of Canada). He famously commented, "There's no place for the state in the bedrooms of the nation."[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. "Trudeau’s Omnibus Bill: Challenging Canadian Taboos". CBC Digital Archives (video clip). http://archives.cbc.ca/400d.asp?id=1-73-538-2671. Retrieved 2008-03-29. 
  2. Chronology: Same-sex marriage, Canada.com, Tuesday, June 28, 2005
Canadian LGBT History
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