Adventist Youth Honors Answer Book/Outreach/Christian Citizenship (South Africa)

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Christian Citizenship (South Africa)
Outreach
General Conference
Skill Level 1 Answer-Keys 06.jpg
Year of Introduction: 1938
Contents

Contents

1. Describe the national, state or provincial, AY, Pathfinder, and Christian flags.[edit]

National Flag: Flag of South Africa
Pathfinder Flag: The Pathfinder flag is made from one of several materials, cotton bunting, rayon, or nylon. The flag is divided through the center both vertically and horizontally making four equal parts. The background colors are royal blue and white alternately sewed together with the upper left hand comer being royal blue. The Pathfinder emblem is centered in the heart of the background. The colors are descriptive of the purposes and ideals of Pathfindering. White means purity, blue means loyalty, red reminds us of the shed blood of Christ (sacrifice), and gold means excellence. The symbols also have meanings. The shield is the protection of God, the sword is his word, the Bible, and the triangle represents completeness. Completeness of the Godhead (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), and completeness of the three parts of education (Mental, Physical, and Spiritual).
AY Flag: The background is red and white, red symbolizing the blood of Christ and white representing purity. In the center, there is a logo that has AY which means Adventist Youth and it has three angels meaning the 3 angels message.
Christian Flag: The "Christian Flag" is a white flag with a blue canton and a red cross in it. It was designed by Charles Overton in 1897 to represent Protestants of all denominations. The cross symbolizes the crucifixion of Christ.

Current state/provincial flags[edit]

2. Know how to display the national flag with two other flags under the following situations: a. Camp out/camporee b. Fair c. Pathfinder Day program d. Parade[edit]

1. When the National Flag is displayed vertically against a wall, the red band should be to the left of the spectator with the hoist or the cord seam uppermost; when it is displayed horizontally, the hoist should be to the left of the spectator and the band uppermost.


2. When the National Flag is displayed next to or behind the speaker in a hall or other meeting place, for example with him on a stage, it must be placed on the speaker’s right hand. When it is placed elsewhere in the hall or meeting place it should be to the right of the audience as they face the speaker.


3. When the National Flag is displayed together with :

(a) Any other flags, it must be hoisted first and lowered last;

(b) the national flags of other countries, all the flags should be of approximately equal size and must be flown at an equal height, and the National Flag of the Republic of South Africa must be on the right side of the building or platform (that is to say, on the left side from the observer’s point of view);

(c) any other flags, not being other national flags, on separate flag staffs, the National Flag must be in the middle or on the left side from the observer’s point of view or at the highest point of the group;

(d) any other flags on the same flagstaff, it must be at the top;

(e) any other flag on crossed staffs, the National Flag must be to the spectators’ left and its staff must be in front of the staff of the other flag;

(f) another flag or flags in procession, the National Flag must be on the marching right (that is to say, on the left side from the observer’s point of view). If there is a row of flags, the National Flag must be in the middle or on the left side from the observer’s point of view or at the highest point of the group


The national flag should never be dipped as a sign of respect to a dignitary. The Pathfinder flag, AY flag and Christian flag are dipped when the "eyes right" command is given, but the National Flag should be held vertically.

3. Demonstrate how to fold and salute your national flag. Mention when and how it should be displayed.[edit]

Folding[edit]

Flag Protocol[edit]

The National Flag must at all times be treated with dignity and respect. The Flag must not

(a) touch the floor or the ground;

(b) be used as a tablecloth or be draped in front of a platform;

(c) be used to cover a statue, plaque, cornerstone etc, at unveiling or similar ceremonies; or

(d) be used to start or finish any competition, race or similar event.


Flag Staffs

(a) Flagstaffs which are erected outside a building should be placed either on the roof or in front of the building in order to give the greatest possible prominence to the National Flag

(b)Flagstaffs used indoors must be placed as prominently as possible in entrance halls, conference rooms and in certain offices


Hoisting of the National Flag

Except on ceremonial occasions, where the National Flag should be hoisted unfurled, it should at the specified hour be hoisted rolled-up to break at the truck and at sunset, or at the appointed time, it should be lowered slowly.


Size of the National Flag

(a) for ordinary use – 270cm x 180cm or 180cm x 120cm according to the size of the building;

(b) for use during stormy weather – 90cm x 60cm


General Instructions

1. When the National Flag is displayed vertically against a wall, the red band should be to the left of the spectator with the hoist or the cord seam uppermost; when it is displayed horizontally, the hoist should be to the left of the spectator and the band uppermost.


2. When the National Flag is displayed next to or behind the speaker in a hall or other meeting place, for example with him on a stage, it must be placed on the speaker’s right hand. When it is placed elsewhere in the hall or meeting place it should be to the right of the audience as they face the speaker.


3. When the National Flag is displayed together with :

(a) Any other flags, it must be hoisted first and lowered last;

(b) the national flags of other countries, all the flags should be of approximately equal size and must be flown at an equal height, and the National Flag of the Republic of South Africa must be on the right side of the building or platform (that is to say, on the left side from the observer’s point of view);

(c) any other flags, not being other national flags, on separate flag staffs, the National Flag must be in the middle or on the left side from the observer’s point of view or at the highest point of the group;

(d) any other flags on the same flagstaff, it must be at the top;

(e) any other flag on crossed staffs, the National Flag must be to the spectators’ left and its staff must be in front of the staff of the other flag;

(f) another flag or flags in procession, the National Flag must be on the marching right (that is to say, on the left side from the observer’s point of view). If there is a row of flags, the National Flag must be in the middle or on the left side from the observer’s point of view or at the highest point of the group

4. Explain the meaning of and reason for the National Anthem, and recite the words from memory.[edit]

Since 1997, the South African national anthem has been a hybrid song combining new English lyrics with extracts of the hymn Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika (God Bless Africa) and Die Stem van Suid-Afrika (The Call of South Africa). Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika was composed by a Methodist school teacher named Enoch Sontonga in 1897. It was first sung as a church hymn, but later became an act of political defiance against the apartheid government. Die Stem van Suid-Afrika is a poem written by C.J. Langenhoven in 1918 and was set to music by the Reverend Marthinus Lourens de Villiers in 1921. It was the national anthem until 1995.

The lyrics employ the five most widely spoken of South Africa's eleven official languages – Xhosa (first stanza, first two lines), Zulu (first stanza, last two lines), Sesotho (second stanza), Afrikaans (third stanza), and English (final stanza).

Language Lyrics English translation[1]
Xhosa Nkosi sikelel' iAfrika
Maluphakanyisw' uphondo lwayo,
God bless Africa
Let its (Africa's) horn be raised,
Zulu Yizwa imithandazo yethu,
Nkosi sikelela, thina lusapho lwayo.
Listen also to our prayers,
Lord bless us, we are the family of it (Africa).
Sesotho Morena boloka setjhaba sa heso,
O fedise dintwa le matshwenyeho,
O se boloke, O se boloke setjhaba sa heso,
Setjhaba sa, South Afrika — South Afrika.
Lord bless our nation,
Stop wars and sufferings,
Save it, save our nation,
The nation of South Africa — South Africa.
Afrikaans Uit die blou van onse hemel,
Uit die diepte van ons see,
Oor ons ewige gebergtes,
Waar die kranse antwoord gee,
Out of the blue of our heavens,
From the depth of our sea,
Over our everlasting mountains,
Where the cliffs give answer,
English
Sounds the call to come together,
And united we shall stand,
Let us live and strive for freedom
In South Africa our land.

5. Give the rights and responsibilities of a citizen of your country.[edit]

Rights[edit]

Responsibilities[edit]

6. Have an interview with a local, regional, or national official of your country, and learn about his duties.[edit]

It is generally easier to get a local official to agree to an interview, though it is often more exciting to interview a more prominent person. The interview can be accomplished during a club meeting, and multiple Pathfinders can ask questions. Invite your guest well ahead of time, and make sure everyone in the club is on time. A visit by an official would be a very good reason to have everyone in the club wear their class A uniforms. If desired, you can make up several questions ahead of time, writing them on index cards, and distributing them to the members of your club. But do not be so rigid as to not allow them to ask spontaneous questions. Having questions prepared ahead of time on index cards are a good way to get things rolling. Here are some suggested questions:

  • Could you describe a typical day at work?
  • What is the most difficult part of your job?
  • What is the most satisfying aspect of your job?
  • To whom do you report?
  • How did you get your position? Were you elected, appointed, or hired?
  • How should a young person prepare for a life of public service?

7. Write a one-page essay or give a two-minute oral report about a famous person in your country. Mention what he has done to gain his recognition.[edit]

This would be an excellent opportunity to present a worship during the opening exercises of a regular club meeting. Encourage your Pathfinder to choose a person they are personally interested in. If they cannot think of anyone themselves, have a list of suggested persons at hand and encourage them to choose from the list. Famous people might be historical figures, politicians, actors, sports stars, or anyone else. It would be preferable to choose a person who has been a positive influence on the country.

Although the requirement asks that you "mention what he has done to gain his recognition," this should not be interpreted as excluding women. Men are not the only famous people in a country.

8. Do one of the following[edit]

a. Make a list of ten famous quotations from leaders of your country.[edit]

b. Make a list of ten famous historic places in your country.[edit]

c. Make a list of ten famous historic events in your country.[edit]

9. Describe what you can do as a citizen to help your church and country.[edit]

The best way to help either your church or your country is by getting involved. Edmund Burke, an English philosopher summed this up when he said "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

In your church, this means that you will show up for services on a regular basis. It also means you will support it with your tithes and offering, show up for business meetings, and not wait to be asked before you volunteer your services. If you see something that needs done, do it. If you do not have the skill to do it, or you think that you need permission first, talk to your pastor, an elder, deacon, or deaconess. Find your ministry!

For your country, it is much the same. Show up for public meetings, stay informed about the issues of the day, vote if you are eligible, and pay your taxes fairly and promptly.

10. Go through the steps of an individual acquiring citizenship in the country and learn how this is done.[edit]

11. Know how to explain the process of government in your country.[edit]

12. Explain the meaning of this statement Jesus made in Matthew 22:21: "Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's, and unto God the things that are God's.[edit]

This verse teaches that governmental authority is to be respected, as long as it does not conflict with the moral obligations of being a Christian. Government serves a holy purpose; preserving social order, promoting the well-being of its citizens, and protecting their safety. If you believe that this does not apply today because you see the government as corrupt, you are urged to research the Roman government of the first century A.D. when these words were spoken by Jesus. Was Herod corrupt? Was Pilate just?

13. Explain why laws are established in your country.[edit]

References[edit]

  1. "Teach Yourself to sing Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrica". Finebushpeople.co.za. 2012-07-15. http://finebushpeople.co.za/farmstore/catalog/nkosi.htm. Retrieved 2012-08-27.