A Guide to the GRE/The GRE Writing Section

From Wikibooks, open books for an open world
Jump to: navigation, search

The GRE Writing Section[edit]

The writing section is of rather small importance in admissions decisions compared to the other two; nonetheless, it is worthwhile for test takers to do the best they can on it.

As stated at the beginning, there are two writing sections. One is an analysis of an issue; the other is an analysis of an argument.

There are three things to remember about the writing section.

1. Write a lot. The single strongest objective predictor of high essay grades is length.

2. Sound intelligent.

✗Bad ✓Good
Things like social security are a good idea. It is good to have a social safety net for seniors. Social security helps keeps seniors out of poverty. The beneficial nature of social security is clear, given the public interests furthered by the safety net it provides, and the extent to which it keeps seniors out of poverty.

3. Don't ramble.

✗Bad ✓Good
Direct voting by the public on political issues would help in some cases. It would depend, however, on the complexity of the matter - some things would be incomprehensible to the lay person. This raises an interesting question - is the average person cut out to make leadership decisions? Historically democracies have usually exercised some level of autonomy. Of course, there are varying levels of autonomy in the United States. Nonetheless, the United States has managed to accede to public will on most issues historically. Direct voting by the public on political issues would help in some cases. The government can only remain stable and effective if it serves the people, and direct voting would bring about this end. However, the question arises as to whether some issues are too complex for the average voter. Many laws are quite complicated, and the lay person may not have the necessary expertise to properly evaluate changes to them.

Keep thoughts concise and coherent; and, generally, use common sense on the writing section. Again, however, the section is not particularly important. Do not let it take away from the other very important sections.