A-level English/Wise Children/Model Answers

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Exam Tips[edit]

  • Underline Key Words in the title of your exam. If it's: "Describe the importance of..." then underline "importance". It may sound a bit obvious, but doing this means you won't accidentally misread the question or forget what it's about.
  • Every paragraph should contain the word "importance" or "vital" or any other synonym of importance, that's what's going to get you full marks.
  • Make a statement, a quotation (not "quote", examiners don't like that), then explain. Do this for every paragragh. Don't write, for ages, an introduction about Angela Carter's life or the importance of other characters - this is not important.
  • Paragraph structure is the basis for a good essay: - P.E.E.E.E

     P - Point. Make your point clearly and in a straight forward manner.
     E - Evidence. Supply evidence for your point (a short quotation or close textual reference)
     E - Explanation. Remember the novel is written for a purpose. Explain this purpose; why has Carter written this, what's her motivation?
     examine the quotes relevance to the whole novel, language, structure etc.) Make a link to the next piece of evidence.
     E - Evidence. Support your previous point, evidence and explanation with a another quote or close textual reference.
     Try to flow through your argument to the end of the paragraph, and develop your point as you go.
     E - Evaluation. Evaluate the point with its evidence as a whole. Make an observation about the quotes as a group, analyze Carters intent and purpose.
     Further analyze the devises and techniques she uses and why. Make a short link to the next paragraph.

  • Focus on the character they want. Focus on his importance, both explicitly and implicitly.
  • Apply this knowledge to any other question you may get.
  • Sophisticated expression of points being made.
  • Answer the question; don't forget what it's about! If you get a question on roles, the best technique is to outline each role and its significance, and only then look for an example from the text. That way you don't ramble on about a quotation which isn't relevant.