Wildlife Gardening/Evaluation tables/Trees/Northeastern United States

From Wikibooks, open books for an open world
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Trees to consider[edit]

Native trees to consider[edit]

Native trees of West Virginia
Taxon Amphibians and fishes Birds Mammals Reptiles Invertebrates Plants and fungi Notes
Eastern Redbud.png

Cercis canadensis, the eastern redbud. Spring blossoming pictured.

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Beneficial for this purpose

Little to no effect

Exhibits a flourish of beautiful pink flowers in spring. Attracts long-tongued bees.[1]

Crataegus crus-galli kz01.jpg

Crataegus crus-galli, the cockspur hawthorn. Spring blossoming pictured.

Little to no effect

Beneficial for this purpose

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Very beneficial for this purpose

Detrimental for this purpose

Especially attractive to bees, including multiple Andrena species ("mining bees"), bumble bees, and honey bees. Birds are also attracted to this tree.[1] May be moderately allelopathic.[2]

Вербові котики. Pussy willow..jpg

Salix discolor, the American pussy willow. Spring blossoming of catkintype flowers pictured.

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Beneficial for this purpose

Little to no effect

Flowers in spring. Attracts bees and serves as a host plant for Nymphalis antiopa, the mourning cloak butterfly.[1]

Amerikaanse linde (Tilia americana). Locatie Hortus Haren.jpg

Tilia americana, the American basswood or American linden.

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Very beneficial for this purpose

Slightly detrimental for this purpose

Its flowers are "extremely" attractive to bees.[1]



Slightly allelopathic.[2]


Native trees of West Virginia
Taxon Amphibians and fishes Birds Mammals Reptiles Invertebrates Plants and fungi Notes
2014-05-13 08 32 55 Eastern Red Cedar at South Riding Golf Club in South Riding, Virginia.JPG

Juniperus virginiana, the eastern redcedar or Virginia juniper.

Little to no effect

Very beneficial for this purpose

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Very beneficial for this purpose

Little to no effect

cover for wildlife. bird nesting site. bird food. winter bird food. winter food for cedar waxwings. food for breeding birds. caterpillar host plant. many specialists like juniper hairstreak. evergreen screen. shade tree. "berry-like cones used for flavoring gin".

Pinus strobus trees.jpg

Pinus strobus, the eastern white pine.

Little to no effect

Very beneficial for this purpose

Very beneficial for this purpose

Little to no effect

Very beneficial for this purpose

Slightly detrimental for this purpose

wildlife cover. bird nest. winter bird food. breeding bird food. spring bird food. mammal food. caterpillar host plant. evergreen screen. shade tree. many mammals many birds more than 210 species of caterpillar. carbon sequestration.



Slightly allelopathic.[2]


2013-05-10 11 01 36 Virginia Pine along the Mount Misery Trail in Brendan T. Byrne State Forest, New Jersey.jpg

Pinus virginiana, the Virginia pine or Jersey pine.

Little to no effect

Very beneficial for this purpose

Very beneficial for this purpose

Little to no effect

Very beneficial for this purpose

Little to no effect

wildlife cover. bird nest. winter bird food. breeding bird food. spring bird food. mammal food. caterpillar host plant. evergreen screen. shade tree. many mammals many birds more than 210 species of caterpillar.

Tsuga canadensis morton.jpg

Tsuga canadensis, the eastern hemlock.

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Little to no effect

Detrimental for this purpose

Moderately allelopathic.[2]

Introduced trees to consider[edit]

Trees to avoid[edit]

Native trees to avoid[edit]

Introduced trees to avoid[edit]

Coder, K.D., 1999. Potential Allelopathy in Different Tree Species.University of Georgia, Daniel B. Warnell School of Forest Resources. pp. 1–5 (Extension publication FOR99-003).


Coder, Kim D. (April, 1999). "Potential Allelopathy in Different Tree Species" (in English). Daniel B. Warnell School of Forest Resources Extension publications (University of Georgia) 99 (3): 1-5. http://www.walterreeves.com/uploads/pdf/potentialallelopathyindifferenttreespecies.pdf. Retrieved 12-03-2019. 

  1. a b c d Adamson, Nancy Lee; Borders, Brianna; Cruz, Jessa Kay; Jordan, Sarah Foltz; Gill, Kelly; Hopwood, Jennifer; Lee-Mäder, Eric; Minnerath, Ashley et al. (2017) "Pollinator Plants: Mid-Atlantic Region" (in English) Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation pp. 3 https://xerces.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/2017-049_Mid-AtlanticPlantList_Dec2017_web-3page.pdf. Retrieved 09-02-2019 
  2. a b c d Coder, Kim D. (April, 1999). "Potential Allelopathy in Different Tree Species" (in English). Daniel B. Warnell School of Forest Resources Extension publications (University of Georgia) 99 (3): 1-5. http://www.walterreeves.com/uploads/pdf/potentialallelopathyindifferenttreespecies.pdf. Retrieved 12-03-2019.