Wikijunior:Math For The Young/Counting 0 - 10

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Math For The Young: Counting 0 - 10[edit]

0 Zero ______________________________nothing

1 One ◊ ___________________________one diamond

2 Two ♣ ♣_______________________two clovers

3 Three ♦ ♦ ♦ ______________________three filled diamonds

4 Four ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ___________________four hearts

5 Five *****________________________five stars

Every number tells how many of something there is. I have five fingers. The number 5 is the same as the word Five or ()()()()(). How many fingers do you have?

Workbook Pages to print[edit]

Below are practice pages for Counting 1 - 8.

Teaching Ideas[edit]

Games For Teacher to play with students to teach counting.

Counting is a fundamental skill everyone must know to survive. Counting will help at market, in farming, and much more. Counting can be fun also. For small children one can amass beads, buttons, pebbles, sticks, card board pieces, etc... and use them as game pieces. Try to get twenty at least of the same kind. As you play with the child count up the pebbles (let's say) and add one each time you count. After you add one, start all over. Then have the child do the same. Make it fun and pleasant by talking nicely and not getting angry or frustrated. They will catch on if shown enough.

If one has enough supplies the pebbles could be painted, the card board pieces drawn on, the buttons strung on a string, the beads strung as well...this will use the kinetic learning (doing) that young children love.

Another possibility is the "Which one is more game?" Using the same counters, divide them amongst two or three children unevenly. The children will notice one has more. Encourage the children to count the pieces and discuss who has more, how much they have, how much more is that than them... Children can notice much this way and will learn quickly.

For children to practice, they could write the numbers on slates. Slates are inexpensive and fun. Plus if a child messes up, no erasers used, or paper to replace. The workbook pages could be used as "tests" to show mom and dad how well the child is progressing. I don't recommend dry-erase boards, which are so popular in American Schools, as the chemicals can irritate little ones lungs.