OpenSCAD User Manual/Building on Microsoft Windows

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Set up tools and dependencies[edit | edit source]

Download 64-bit MSYS2.

Note: For 32-bit support, see the section below.

Install per instructions, including the install-time upgrades (pacman -Syu, -Su). Installing development components is not necessary at this point.

Install OpenSCAD build dependencies[edit | edit source]

Start an MSYS2 shell window using the "MSYS2 MinGW x64" link in the Start menu.

$ curl -L https://github.com/openscad/openscad/raw/master/scripts/msys2-install-dependencies.sh | sh 

Set up source directory[edit | edit source]

Start an MSYS2 shell window using the "MSYS2 MinGW x64" link in the Start menu.

$ git clone https://github.com/openscad/openscad.git srcdir
$ cd srcdir
$ git submodule update --init

Replace "srcdir" with whatever name you like.

Build with command line[edit | edit source]

Set up build directory[edit | edit source]

Start an MSYS2 shell window using the "MSYS2 MinGW x64" link in the Start menu.

$ cd srcdir
$ mkdir builddir
$ cd builddir
$ cmake .. -G"MSYS Makefiles" -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX=/usr -DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=Release -DEXPERIMENTAL=ON -DSNAPSHOT=ON

Replace "builddir" with whatever name you like.

Build[edit | edit source]

Start an MSYS2 shell window using the "MSYS2 MinGW x64" link in the Start menu.

$ cd srcdir/builddir
$ make

You might want to add -jN, where N is the number of compiles to run in parallel - approximately, the number of processor cores on the system.

Run[edit | edit source]

Start an MSYS2 shell window using the "MSYS2 MinGW x64" link in the Start menu.

$ cd srcdir/builddir
$ ./openscad

Build with Qt Creator IDE[edit | edit source]

Note: When I tried this, it mostly built but failed in cgalutils.cc, in an environment where the command-line build worked.

Install QT Creator[edit | edit source]

$ pacman -S mingw-w64-x86_64-qt-creator

Load project[edit | edit source]

$ qtcreator &

Open CMakeLists.txt from the top of the source tree. Use the default configuration.

Build[edit | edit source]

Build with Control-B or Build / Build project "openscad".

32-bit support[edit | edit source]

It may be possible to build OpenSCAD on a 32-bit system by installing the 32-bit version of MSYS2 from the MSYS2 install page. (More information to come.)

Prebuilt OpenSCAD[edit | edit source]

Note that MSYS2 also provides a precompiled OpenSCAD package. This can be installed using

$ pacman -S mingw-w64-x86_64-openscad

Historical Notes[edit | edit source]

The following is historical content from previous versions of this page, that might still be applicable.

QtCreator[edit | edit source]

The Build-Type must be changed to "Release".

In some cases the build fails when generating the parser code using flex and bison. In that case disabling the "Shadow Build" (see Project tab / General Settings) can help.

Building Debug Version[edit | edit source]

Currently the QScintilla package provides only a release version of the library. Using this with a debug build of OpenSCAD is not possible (the resulting binary crashs with an assertion error inside Qt).

To create a working debug version of OpenSCAD, a debug version of QScintilla must be built manually.

  • Extract the archive, change to the subfolder Qt4Qt5 in the QScintilla source tree and edit the qscintilla.pro project file. Rename the build target so the DLL gets a "d" suffix
- TARGET = qscintilla2
+ TARGET = qscintilla2d
  • Change the release config option to debug (also in qscintilla.pro)
- CONFIG += qt warn_off release thread exceptions
+ CONFIG += qt warn_off debug thread exceptions
  • Build the debug DLL
$ qmake
$ mingw32-make
  • Copy the debug library into the default MSYS2 folders
$ cp debug/libqscintilla2d.dll.a /mingw64/lib/
$ cp debug/qscintilla2d.dll /mingw64/bin/

OpenGL (Optional)[edit | edit source]

OpenSCAD needs at least OpenGL version 2.0 to be able to correctly render the preview using OpenCSG. It's possible to run with older versions (e.g. the default provided by Windows, which is 1.4) but the display might differ from the expected output.

For systems that can't provide the needed OpenGL version (e.g. when running on a VM) it's still possible to get the a more recent OpenGL driver using the Mesa software renderer.

$ pacman -S mingw-w64-x86_64-mesa

After installing the mesa driver (default location is C:\msys64\mingw64\bin, the driver itself is opengl32.dll), it can be even activated by copying it into the same folder as the OpenSCAD.exe.

It's possible to enable it for the whole system by copying it to the Windows system32 folder, replacing the old system driver. (Warning: Do that only if you have a backup and enough knowledge how to restore files in a broken Windows installation!)