Nanotechnology/Biosensors

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Biosensors[edit]

Biological sensor functionalisation, receptors and signals

DNA Biosensors[edit]

In the future, DNA will find use as a versatile material from which scientists can craft biosensors. DNA biosensors can theoretically be used for medical diagnostics, forensic science, agriculture, or even environmental clean-up efforts. No external monitoring is needed for DNA-based sensing devises. This is a significant advantage. DNA biosensors are complicated mini-machines—consisting of sensing elements, micro lasers, and a signal generator. At the heart of DNA biosensor function is the fact that two strands of DNA stick to each other by virtue of chemical attractive forces. On such a sensor, only an exact fit—that is, two strands that match up at every nucleotide position—gives rise to a fluorescent signal (a glow) that is then transmitted to a signal generator.


Resources[edit]

. <http://www.nigms.nih.gov>*Performance limits of nanobiosensors App. Phys. Lett. 88, 233120, 2006.

References[edit]

"The Chemistry of Health." The Chemistry of Health (2006): 42-43. National Institutes of Health and National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Web

See also notes on editing this book about how to add references Nanotechnology/About#How_to_contribute.