NVQ Carpentry Level 2

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Site Carpentry

QCF643 Conforming to general health, safety and welfare in the workplace.

1.5 State why and when health and safety control equipment, identified by the principles of protection, should be used relating to types, purpose and limitations of each type, the work situation, occupational use and the general work environment, in relation to:

– collective protective measures

– personal protective equipment (PPE)

– respiratory protective equipment (RPE)

– local exhaust ventilation (LEV).

Collective protective measures applying only to Carpentery include Risk assessments, COSHH assessments, Toolbox talks, method statements, hazard warning signs and Site induction. There are also safety measures on site such as handrails for protection where necessary. Signage and areas you are not allowed in will be clearly visible. All staff should be aware of safety measures and if not, new men to site should be informed at tool box talks. 

Purpose and limitations –are to ensure everyone is aware of the health and safety requirements on site, risks or potential hazards are limited where possible. Any hazards should be identified to all on site. New staff should be shown the risk assessments prior to joining site work. Increased knowledge will also increase chances of reducing injuries.  Limitations: People not reading information available or following instructions. Follow the building regulations and they explain the safe collective measures.

Personal protective equipment (PPE) consists of - Steel toe boots - Protect feet from stubbing toes falling objects, Hi visibility jacket to be seen, Ear defenders to protect hearing.  Hardhat is worn to protect head from falling objects, banging head. Goggles essential to protect eyes, Gloves for hand or any finger injury reduction. Gloves should be particularly used for Joinery and cutting materials with power tools or sharp blades/ saws.  PPE will not protect form all hazards, for example hard hats will only protect from some falling objects not very heavy objects, but they would hopefully take some of the impact. The building regulations will tell you what to wear. 

Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE) Dust masks self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). Need to know limitations and use of each piece of apparatus. The right equipment will stop lungs breathing in harmful dust, toxic fumes and gases. Training is essential to use correctly and maintenance of all PPE must be maintained.

Local exhaust ventilation (LEV) LEV is an engineering control system to reduce dust, mist, fume, vapour or gas in the workplace. It assists by extracting harmful toxic gases from the environment. LEV relies on power and will not work if there is a power cut.

1.5 State how the health and safety control equipment relevant to the work should be used in accordance with the given instructions. 

1.5 All relevant health and safety equipment in Carpentery should be used in relevant work situations as stated in the health and safety regulations. Workers must be trained in using all equipment and maintaining their own PPE. New workers to site should be inducted and have tool box talks, if unsure how to use anything site foreman should be asked. What I would do if there was a changed circumstance or incident in work place: I would report it to my supervisor. How I would comply to environmental requirements: I would comply with the company policies and tool box talk instructions to dispose of waste and reduce dust and other pollutants. Switch off lights and equipment when not in use. Do not play radio loud as this can be distracting and can also stop people hearing if there is an incident. 

1.6 State which types of health, safety and welfare legislation, notices and warning signs are relevant to the occupational area and associated equipment.

1.6 The health, safety and welfare regulations relevant to Carpentery site work is the construction regulation 2013. warning signs are there to support the mandatory wearing of helmet goggles and safety boots. Some sites require high visibility garments. Others signs that could be seen; Scaffold not in use, moving vehicles or crane in use. Hazard signs include electric cable to avoid trips and falls hazards. Notices to visitors; to sign in usually in main office before site entry. 

1.7 State why health, safety and welfare legislation, notices and warning signs are relevant to the occupational area.

1.7 Ensure workers, visitors and site personnel are kept safe and their health and safety needs are met. Sites should where possible include toilets and clean eating areas. 

1.8 State how to comply with control measures that have been identified by risk assessments and safe systems of work.

1.8 Complying with control measures that have been identified by the risk assessments and safe systems of work is required to reduce injury to employees and risk of being sued to the employer. Risk assessments should be available and easily accessed by all involved. They should be discussed with staff on site. 

2.2 List typical hazards associated with the work environment and occupational area in relation to resources, substances, asbestos, equipment, obstructions, storage, services and work activities.

2.2 Typical hazards associated with the Carpentery work environment and occupational area in relation to the following are: 

Resources: materials too heavy to lift and lifting equipment not available can cause injury to back. Cuts to hands if gloves not worn whilst cutting or lifting difficult materials, scaffold unsafe causing falls, equipment poorly maintained, canteen not available or dirty. 

Work activities: not using correct lifting technique or equipment. Untidy work place leads to trips and falls, Bits going in eye when cutting with saw or tools. Injury to hands from cutting materials, Stubbing toes on stored materials. 

Substances: Dust from site or sawdust from wood cutting. Asbestos can be found in older buildings. 

Equipment: Noise from circular saw or hammer drills, routers etc. 

Obstructions: Obstructions can cause falls, and trips. 

Services: when removing materials on site or drilling walls there could be gas or electric piping. When digging out for foundations there are electrical and gas services that are hazards. 

2.3 List the current common safety risks.

2.3 Current common safety risks are: For a joiner the biggest risks are injuries to the hands and loss of fingers. Injuries to back is common as there is a lot of heavy materials to lift, correct manual handling is essential. Sawdust in eyes is also common, reduced risk with protective goggles and PPE worn. 

2.4 List the current common health risks.

2.4 Current common health risks are: Vibration finger due to machinery, hearing impairment, breathing issues due to dusty environments. HIV from body fluids. Back pains due to position of working if in confined spaces. Skin cracks to hands in winter.

2.5 State how changing circumstances within the workplace could cause hazards.

2.5 Changing circumstances within the workplace can cause hazards due to: Employees on site not being aware of changes and potential risks. Employer not being aware of changes to change risk assessment and inform employees. Hazards may change as work progresses and staff should be updated regularly as should risk assessments.

2.6 State the methods used for reporting changed circumstances, hazards and incidents in the workplace.

2.6 Methods used for reporting changed circumstances, hazards and incidents in the workplace are:

Updated risk assessments, toolbox talks, site meetings. 

3.6 State the organisational policies and procedures for health, safety and welfare, in relation to:

– dealing with accidents and emergencies associated with the work and environment

– methods of receiving or sourcing information

– reporting 

– stopping work

– evacuation

– fire risks and safe exit procedures

– consultation and feedback.

3.6 The organisational policies and procedures for health, safety and welfare in relation to dealing with emergencies are to - stop work and contact site foreman immediately, everyone has a responsibility to report any accidents or near misses. If fire alarm starts or lights go out, making it dangerous to work, everyone must stop immediately. Evacuating the site leaving tools and going to nearest fire escape 

All men should be aware of fire risks and follow precautions to reduce risks at all times. Be aware of fire exits and plans for each building in case of fire. 

Site feedback book should be available to record any incidents Site manager should always be aware of any incidents. Site foreman and employees are responsible for ensuring they are aware of site safety procedures.

3.7 State the appropriate types of fire extinguishers relevant to the work.

3.7 Different types of fire extinguishers used in the workplace: CO2 for electrical fires, Water for wood and cloth. Foam for use on fuel fires

Water extinguishers have a red band and are for wood, paper, textile, solid materials fires.

Blue band extinguishers are for electrical fires and varnishes, flammable liquids. They use dry powder foam.  

Black carbon dioxide extinguishers are also used on electrical fires.

3.8 State how and when the different types of fire extinguishers are used in accordance with legislation and official guidance.

3.8 Extinguishers are used by releasing the pin, point at fire and press on the handle. Make sure not to endanger self or colleagues. Always assess fire and ensure feel can extinguish safely if not evacuate and call fire brigade immediately. Only trained people should use them. 

4.2 State how personal behaviour demonstrates responsibility for general workplace health, safety and welfare, in relation to:

– recognising when to stop work in the face of serious and imminent danger to self and/or others

– contributing to discussions and providing feedback

– reporting changed circumstances and incidents in the workplace

– complying with the environmental requirements of the workplace.

4.2 Carpenters should stop work as soon as you see any sign of fire or concern and raise alarm you must run away from fire. 

If fire alarm constantly rings go to nearest fire exit. Complete toolbox talk with site employees or attend if requested, If I did not understand anything I would ask questions. 

4.3 Give examples of how the behaviour and actions of individuals could affect others within the workplace.

4.3 All employees behaviour on site could affect others, we should use power tools correctly,  follow safety regulations and be aware of risk assessments and requirements. No fooling around in the workplace. 

5.2 State how security arrangements are implemented in relation to the workplace, the general public, site personnel and resources.

5.2 Security arrangements should be in the workplace for the general public they should not have access to a site that is unsafe, they would not have PPE, know the risks or safety requirements. Any site personnel should arrive on site and report to site manager, If unknown or visiting personnel they should give their registration for vehicle and give name, with arrival sign in and ensure aware to sign off site as they leave. Power tools should be stored in a secure container on site. 

Unit no- QCF642 Conforming to  Productive working practices in the workplace.

1.2 Describe the different methods of communicating with line management, colleagues and customers.

1.2 Communicating with management can be through phone, face to face if urgent or difficult information to pass on, email, and completion of forms. You often need to shout loud on site as it is noisy and that helps with communicating. Colleagues can communicate in the same ways. Customers should always be communicated with politely and listened to ensuring their needs understood. Customers can also be communicated through advertising online, posters and phone calls. 

1.3 Describe how to use different methods of communication to ensure that the work carried out is productive.

1.3 Productive work relies on good communication with all site staff, employees should be aware of job sheets and expectations. Time lines assist with work to be completed and expectations of customers. Site meetings and method statements assist with communication and achieving productivity. 

2.3 Describe how organisational procedures are applied to ensure work is planned and carried out productively, in relation to: 

– using resources for own and other’s work requirements

– allocating appropriate work to employees

– organising the work sequence- reducing carbon emissions.

2.3 Always apply organisational procedures to ensure work is planned and carried out productively: 

Using resources for own and others work requirements by ensuring job accurately measured to see time that will be required and materials that will be needed. Tools and materials should be made available as required. 

Site foreman usually allocates work to employees. They should understand employee’s knowledge and skill to ensure work allocated appropriately. If more men required, this should be communicated to foreman and organised. Waste should be minimised by only ordering necessary materials and not having delays. 

2.4 Describe how to contribute to zero/low carbon work outcomes within the built environment.

2.4 Contributing to zero/low carbon work outcomes within the built environment can be achieved by the selection of appropriate raw materials. Always turn off equipment when not in use. Reduce waste always measure twice and cut once!

3.2 Describe how to complete and maintain documentation in accordance with organisational procedures, in relation to:

– job cards

– worksheets 

– material/resource lists

- time sheets.

3.2 Job cards assist with complying to organization procedures by telling personnel about what is required and where, setting expectations and requirements. Jobs should be completed on the date assigned, clearly completed and signed appropriately. Time sheets should be completed by employees as they tell managers how many hours worked each week and ensure correct wages paid; they should be completed and handed directly to site foreman. 

3.3 Explain the reasons for ensuring documentation is completed clearly and within given timescales.

3.3 Documentation should be completed accurately and within set timescales to ensure the job runs smoothly and safely. The site manager should be aware of progress and any issues.

4.3 Describe how to maintain good working relationships, in relation to:

– individuals.

– customer and operative.

– operative and line management. 

- own and other occupations. 

4.3 Good working relations are maintained in relation to the following in these ways:

Individuals- knowing expectations and being informed. 

Customers can receive Emails, photos/plans/pictures and drawings.  Site meetings. Ensuring informed means happy with work or ability to raise concerns timely.

Regular site updates will create good team work as everyone clear of expectations.

Understanding each other’s skills within professions, helps maintain good working relationships. 

4.4 Describe why it is important to work effectively with line management, colleagues and customers.

4.4 It is important to work effectively with line managers, colleagues and customers to ensure expectations met, the job is completed within set timescales. Everyone is aware of progress, any issues and completion timescales. 

4.5 Describe how working relationships could have an effect on productive working.

4.5 Working relationships have an effect on productivity as poor relationships can hinder progress. Cause slow working inaccurate completion of jobs and unhappy customers. Leads to poor communication amongst employees.

4.6 Describe how to apply principles of equality and diversity when communicating and working with others.

4.6 Principles of equality and diversity, when communicating and working with others can be achieved by knowing site employees, their background, skills, knowledge, and personal requirements. Everyone should be treated fairly even if you are gay.

Unit QCF643 Moving, Handling and Storing Resources in the workplace.

1.3 Describe the different types of technical, product and regulatory information, their source and how they are interpreted.

1.3 Different products come with their own technical and product information. These must be read and followed at all times. If you cannot read you must get a supervisor to read it for you.This information lets the user know of anything specific to ensure safe use, moving and storage of product. Technical information is often about the safe use of the product. If information not readily available can also be found on line for most products or gained from seller or manufacturer.  

1.5 Describe how to obtain information relating to using and storing lifting aids and equipment.

1.5 Information related to using and storing lifting aids should come with the manual for the equipment. This is often attached to the equipment or stored in office; Staff should also attend training regularly and not be allowed to use any equipment if they are not trained in its use. 

2.1 Describe their responsibilities under current legislation and official guidance whilst working:

– in the workplace, in confined spaces, below ground level, at height, with tools and equipment, with materials and substances, with movement/storage of materials and by manual handling and mechanical lifting.

2.1 Responsibilities under current legislation and official guidance whilst working:

In the workplace in confined spaces you should ensure a safe clear working area as possible confined cluttered spaces can often be more dangerous. H&S at work regulations 1995 and 1996 ammendment 4.27 say that risk assessments should be completed for all work environments, this is important for confined spaces. The task, materials and tools required, suitability of completing the task in this environment and arrangements for emergencies should all be considered. Below ground level workers must use PPE and have breathing apparatus if required. They should have gas meter reading equipment for toxic gasses. Should always be two people and someone at ground level that knows you are there. Risk assessments should be completed prior to commencing. If working in trenches ensure sides are propped safely. Working at height- safety harnesses should be used. Risk assessment carried out as previously. Scaffolds should be used and PASMA qualified staff only to use scaffolding. Cherry picker should be used if appropriate. Method statements should be followed. 

All employees must be qualified and competent to use any tools. Movement and storage of materials is also managed by correct manual handling and safe storage guidelines. 

2.2 Describe the organisational security procedures for tools, equipment and personal belongings in relation to site, workplace, company and operative.

2.4 Site security should be covered by the company. Night site operatives should be employed if risks remain at night. All tools should be stored safely and securely when not in use with lock boxes available. All personal belongings should be stored safely and out of the way. 

2.3 Explain what the accident reporting procedures are and who is responsible for making the reports.

2.3 How to report an accident

• If injury happens, person must report to site foreman and put in book

• If injuries can be tended on site first aider to support. 

• If serious injury ambulance or attendance at A&E may be required. 

• Serious injuries must be investigated by the site foreman or the company representative.

• Measures should be put in place to reduce risk of similar injury occurring again. 

2.4 See Q 3.7 QCF 641 these assessment questions have already been answered.

2.5 As above met in QCF 641 Q 3.8

3.4 See unit QCF641 Q 1.4 question already answered 

3.5 This question has already been answered in QCF 641 question 1.5

4.2 Describe the characteristics, quality, uses, sustainability, limitations and defects associated with the occupational resources in relation to: Lifting and handling aids, Container, Fixing, holding and securing systems 

Characteristics Quality           Uses Sustainability Limitations Defects

Lifting and handling aids

Buckets/wheel barrows 

Fork lift

Trolley Plaster board lifter. 

Genie. 

Must be maintained to keep workable standard.  

specific uses otherwise quality cannot be guaranteed Lifting of heavy  material.

Used for transferring materials and equipment/tools etc

Made of strong materials that should last a long time. Must be used correctly to secure and maintain safe use and durability

Manufacturing instructions must be followed. If any defects found do not use

Container Metal materials Strong durable quality Storage of materials/tools for security and safety Long lasting, material reusable Required in different sizes Lock breakages door hinges break

Fixings Wall ties, retainers, screws Fixing inner and outer walls

Screws are used to fix doors and windows. Retainers hold insulation in place Reusable materials Specific fixings for different tasks Usually strong lasting any defects do not use.

4.3 Describe how the resources should be handled and how any problems associated with the resources are reported.

4.3 Any resources should be used according to manufacturer’s instructions. With any problems reported to site manager and provider of resources.

4.4 Explain why the organisational procedures have been developed and how they are used for the selection of required resources.

4.4 Organisational procedures are in place to ensure material is selected and controlled to prevent theft, over ordering and stocking and to ensure enough materials are available to maintain productivity. It also ensures the correct materials for the job are used. All materials should be handled according to the manufacturer’s instructions and any risk assessments. 

4.5 Describe any potential hazards associated with the resources and methods of work.

4.5 Potential hazards associated with the resources and methods of work include injury from tool use, falls trips and slips from risks on site, manual handling injuries through incorrect manual handling. Exposure to hazardous substances. Environmental risks associated to asbestos, mould and bacteria if not stored correctly prior to use. 

5.4 Describe how to protect work from damage and the purpose of protection in relation to general workplace activities, other occupations and adverse weather conditions.

 5.4 All materials should be stored as recommended to avoid damage. Adverse weather to untreated timber is damaging. This will lead to a less than standard finish. If removing doors and windows of properties that are habited this must be planned around the weather to avoid damage to property and belongings. If unable to avoid weather tarpaulin could be used to protect property. 

5.5 Explain why the disposal of waste should be carried safely in accordance with environmental responsibilities, organisational procedures, manufacturers’ information, statutory regulations and official guidance.

5.5 Disposal of waste should be carried out safely, Correct skips for recycling waste should be used, all waste should be stored safely and securely until collected. Ensure waste is moved correctly using PPE and lifting aids as required. 

6.2 State the purpose of the work programme and explain why deadlines should be kept in relation to:

– progress charts, timetables and estimated times– organisational procedures for reporting circumstances which will affect the work programme.

6.2 Progress charts are to show start and finish times of jobs. The building contractor has a contractual obligation to provide these charts. If there is no progress plan it would be difficult to manage the work as no one would understand the scheduling of events to ensure completion. 

7.4 If resources are moved and stored differently I would need to ensure other work colleagues aware, prior to me moving them and where they are moved to, this would then not disrupt their working and productivity. 

QCF628 v2 Setting up and using transportable cutting and shaping machines.

1.3 Describe the organisational procedures developed to report and rectify inappropriate information and unsuitable resources and how they are implemented.

1.3 If there was any information I have that was wrong or inappropriate I would inform my supervisor; he would then refer to site manager. I would then wait instruction on how to proceed.

 1.4 Describe different types of information, their source

and how they are interpreted in relation to:

– specifications, current legislation, method

statements, risk assessments and

manufacturer’s information

1.4 Describe different types of information, their source and how they are interpreted in relation to:

Drawings show what is to be built some of it will be very detailed and may be to scale. It will have sizes of rooms and heights and instruct what materials to be used. Usually found in site office.

Job specifications, is a written description of the quality of materials and details of any fixing and dimensions of the construction work to be used with drawings when building. Found in site office.

Risk assessments, provide a process of identifying any potential risks that may be involved in an activity, referencing the risk assessment helps prevent accidents. Increases the understanding of potential risks. Found in site office.

Method statements help manage the work ensuring necessary precautions have been shared with those involved. Method statements help reduce hazards by planning an operation. Found in site office.

Schedules are used for listing repetitive items in a construction project, such as doors windows and their ironmongery, manholes, finishing to rooms, etc. Found in site office.

A Manufacturer’s information can be found on the product itself and explains how the item should be handled or used. Building regulations should be followed at all times, it’s a procedure put in place to set a standed of work required by the builder, the work had to match the regulations or be to a higher standard, building regulations can be changed if you go through the correct procedures and health and safety checks first Local council offices regulate building developments and renovations. 

2.1 Describe their responsibilities under current

legislation and official guidance whilst working:

– in the workplace, at height, in confined areas,

with tools and equipment, with movement/

storage of materials and by manual handling

2.1 Whenever working on site anything that you think may endanger the health and safety of yourself, other persons or members of the public should be reported to the supervisor/site manager. 

Correct PPE should always be used as required by health and safety legislation. 

Manual Handling can be very dangerous when not carried out correctly, should always follow risk assessment as you do not want any trip hazards popping up when carrying heavy objects. Carrying equipment should always be used if weight above recommendations for personal lifting, and should only be used if correctly trained. 

Working below ground level there’s a danger of being buried or crushed if the area working in collapses, there should always be someone working above ground who is able to raise alarm. 

When working on a scaffold you must be aware of falling over the edge, to reduce the potential risk of falling hand rails should be all around at a height of 950mm to prevent falling over the edge.

2.2 This has previously been answered in questions QCF 643 Q 2.2 

2.3 This question has been answered in QCF 643 Q 2.3

2.4This question has been answered in QCF 641 Q 3.8

3.3 This question has been previously answered in QCF 641 Q1.4

3.4 This question has previously been answered in QCF 641 Q 1.5

3.5 This question has been previously answered in QCF 643 Q 3.6

4.2 Tools and equipment –Describing the characteristics, quality, uses, sustainability, limitations and defects. 

Characteristics uses Limitations Defects Sustainability

Wood products /Doors Windows. Should be made from hardwood or softwood, machined correctly. Separate rooms, insulate/ fit into frames. Have to be correct measured size to fit openings. If not manufactured or stored correctly can bow and twist out of shape. All wood is sustainable. Sustainable sources should be found and used as a priority.

Fixings, Screws, bolts, nails etc Made from metals, stainless steel etc. Should be rust proof if used for outside fixings. Used for fixing materials together. Only suitable for particular fixings wrong fixings will not hold as well as they should. Can come damaged and bent should not be used If correctly used should last a long time. 

Insulation Kingspan, compressed insulation. For insulating spaces usually loft space or wall space. Prevent heat escaping can also assist with sound proofing. Come in different thickness and sizes should be used appropriately No good if cracked or wet Can be made from recycled materials.

Power tools Made from steel and plastic, rubber handles. Used for wood working, machining woods. Make machining wood much quicker than by hand, more efficient and if used correctly can be safer. Only as good as the tradesman using them. Often can develop faulty cables, or blades can become less effective. Require maintaining well to ensure long use. Do burn out depending on use.  Some products have recyclable properties. 

4.3 Describe how the resources should be used correctly,how problems associated with the resources are reported and how the organisational procedures are used

4.3 All resources should only be used in line with the manufacturer’s recommendations. Any defects should be reported immediately and the tools taken out of use and clearly marked as defective do not use. 

4.4 Explain why the organisational procedures have been developed and how they are used for the selection of required resources.

4.4 Organisational procedures are used for the selection of required resources to ensure the correct materials are used for the job, the correct amounts are available to prevent over ordering and to monitor use to ensure theft of resources does not occur. All materials should be delivered as close to the area they will be required in as possible to reduce the need for manual handling unnecessarily. 

4.5 Describe any potential hazards associated with the resources and methods of work.

4.5 If rules and regulations are followed injury from resources and materials could be reduced, such as slips, trips, falls over misplaced materials. Injury from over lifting weights that is outside capability. Health risks apply if PPE is not used correctly as previously stated.  Injuries have the potential to be serious, dangers from working with materials and resources of this nature should not be underestimated. 

4.6 Describe how to calculate quantity and length associated with the method/procedure to erect and remove specialist access equipment.

4.6 Calculating quantity and length associated with specialist access equipment is achieved by:

I would specify to a scaffolding company how high, how long and how many lifts the specialist access equipment would be required to be. This would need to be within building safety requirements for specific task in hand. They would measure the height and length of scaffold required, ensuring steps are built into the scaffolding to comply with health and safety regulations.

 5.4 Describe how to protect work from damage and the purpose of protection in relation to general workplace activities, other occupations and adverse weather conditions

5.4 We protect timber and other materials to keep as dry as possible, to prevent twisting. When working in joiner’s shops all timber is stacked on metal shelving to keep straight. It must also be stacked safely and not too high so it topples over. Doors must always be stored flat on top of each other to stop twisting. If timber is used for outside purposes, it should always be treated first to prevent damage and make weatherproof. 

5.5 Explain why the disposal of waste should be carried out safely in accordance with environmental responsibilities, organisational procedures, manufacturers' information, statutory regulations and official guidance.

5.5 If working on a site there should be different skips to put different waste into, this helps to ensure recycling of materials occurs. Company policy on waste management and recycling should always be adhered to. Do not flush hand towels down toilets as they will block.

6.2 Describe the purpose of the work programme and explain why deadlines should be kept in relation to:

organisational procedures for reporting

circumstances which will affect the work

programme

6.2 The purpose of a progress chart is to show start and completion times of operations. These are contractual obligation and if they are not meet there can be financial penalties to the building contractor. The programme can identify problems or progress. It enables planning of materials plant and personnel and helps plan for remedial actions to get back onto schedule. Should there be a situation with resources that may cause delays to the work then we are to report to my supervisor immediately.

7.5 Describe how to apply safe work practices, follow procedures, report problems and establish the authority needed to rectify them, to:

– check powered transportable cutting and shaping machines (fuel and electric mains/battery) for serviceability

– check voltage requirements, safety cut offs and circuit breakers 

– set up machines in preparation for use

– fix and secure work

– select and ensure safety guards are in place in accordance with machine instructions

– select accessories for the machine and the work

– identify maintenance requirements for accessories.

7.5

Applying safe work practices Follow procedures Report problems Establish authority required to rectify

Power tools Follow instructions

Ensure trained to use

Ensure blades are kept sharp, all leads have no splits. Safety guards are available and in good working order Ensure pat tested To site foreman first. Manufacturer if required Foreman

Electrician to get pat tested. 

Manufacturer

Voltage requirements Preferred 110 voltage for all power tools on site Competent to use tools, Ensure new staff aware of regulations As Above As above

Set up machines in preparation for use Dust extraction kits to be used if required. 

Ensure automatic feeds are set correctly. Ensure check in good working order, guards in place, no lose wiring. 

Staff trained in set up and use. Follow manufacturing set up guidelines for each piece of equipment

Ensure all equipment is maintained appropriately as per instructions. As Above As Above

Fix and secure work Use G cramps to secure wood to bench. Health and safety procedures Ensure G cramps in working order. And secured properly Inform foreman if any problems. 

7.6 Describe how to apply safe work practices, follow procedures, report problems and establish the authority needed to rectify them, to:

– cut and shape materials to agreed tolerances

– change saw blades: circular, chop, mitre, bench, jig, reciprocating, alligator and scroll

– change accessories: drill bits, router bits, discs, planner blades, abrasives.

– use templates, profiles and jigs

– operate fixed machines

– use tools, accessories and equipment

– work at height

– use access equipment.

7.6 Safety work practice is a set guideline to help workers perform tasks that may not require step by step procedure. They must be applied when cutting and shaping materials by ensuring guard rails are kept close to the saw blades, not exposing the saw. If changing blades, router bits etc always ensure power is turned off first.  Ensure PPE is worn when handling blades and hazardous tools and material. Ensure trained in safe use of tools and changing accessories. When using templates, profiles and jigs you must make sure they are correctly cramped to work place. If work becomes lose this could be dangerous. When operating fixed machines, the same principles apply, ensure all blades and guards are fixed correctly. Ensure dust extraction is in working order when using fixed machines. Working at height increases risk of injury, use harness and hard hats as required. Make sure correct height adjusting equipment, ladders or scaffolding is set correctly. Problems with all of the above would be reported through site foreman and manager and written in site safety book. Any damaged equipment would be removed and labelled as not working. 

Site health and safety procedures are there for the safe management of staff on site. The procedures guide employees as they are a series of steps that guide you from start to finish of a job in chronological order. All employees must know site rules, attend tool box talks and understand the reporting procedures.  

7.7 Describe the needs of other occupations and how to effectively communicate within a team when setting up and using powered transportable cutting and shaping machines.

7.7 When setting up and using powered transportable cutting and shaping machines it is important the team know how to effectively communicate and understand the needs of other occupations. This can be achieved by ensuring all aware of site management requirements, plans of completion and deadlines for each part of the job. Training sessions should be made available for all employees, toolbox talks should be held regularly and employees should be encouraged to attend. All machines should be pat tested, and within date. Each occupation has its own hazards, requirements, risks and timescales and all site staff should be made aware of them and updated regularly as situations change.  All communication across different occupational teams should be polite and clear.

7.8 Describe how to maintain the tools, accessories and ancillary equipment used when setting up and using transportable cutting and shaping machines.

7.8 Before setting up and using any tools they should be completely checked to ensure they are in good working order and comply with site regulations. All safety guards should be in place and available, all wires/cords should be checked to ensure not damaged. The tools should be dry and ensured that they have not got wet in storage. Storage and maintenance of tools is important to assist with keeping them in good working order. Some tools require oil spraying and silicone spraying to ensure they run freely.

QCF12 v2 Maintaining Non-structural Carpentry Work in the Workplace. 

1.3 State the organisational procedures developed to report and rectify inappropriate information and unsuitable resources and how they are implemented.

1.3 The organisational procedures developed to report and rectify inappropriate information and unsuitable resources are access to site foreman, communication books and tool box talk events for sharing information, incident books. They are implemented across sites by all employees being aware they are available and having the responsibility to read and complete.  All staff has good site training on how to comply with site rules and regulations. Ensuring how to access organisational procedures is the individuals and foreman responsibility. 

1.4 Describe different types of information, their source

and how they are interpreted in relation to:

– specifications, current legislation, method

statements, risk assessments and

manufacturer’s information

1.4 Information to employees are available in many forms job specifications are available to inform employees of what is required to be completed and the tools required to complete. It may also have timescales. This is often given in paper form or can be made available through email. Current legislation for site management should be available to all staff on site in folders; it is also available on line. Every employee has a responsibility to know where to access legislation. 

Method statements would be made available by email or in paper form on site. They should be made available before job is started and agreed. Method statements identify the method of completing the tasks in hand. 

Risk assessments should be carried out if any risks are identified, sites will have common risks and specific risks to each site. Risk assessments are to identify risks and put the plan in place to minimise the risk by suggesting ways of minimising risk. Risk assessments are usually kept in site folders. All staff should be aware of how to access.  Building regulations should be followed at all times, it’s a procedure put in place to set a standed of work required by the builder, the work had to match the regulations or be to a higher standard, building regulations can be changed if you go through the correct procedures and health and safety checks first Manufacturer’s information should be available on line if not available on site. 

2.1 Describe their responsibilities under current

legislation and official guidance whilst working:

– in the workplace, at height, in confined areas,

with tools and equipment, with movement/

storage of materials and by manual handling

2.1Responsibilities under current legislation whilst working in the workplace at height are that safe procedures should be used, the height should be risk assessed and if meets the needs for scaffolding this should be put in place, with barriers around at suitable height to prevent falls, If ladders used these should always be securely placed and have an extra person supporting at the bottom. I should never over reach of a ladder as this causes risk of falling. If working in confined spaces ensure safe, access and exit routes appropriate and easily achieved. Ensure safe to manoeuvre and use any tools in the confined space. Ensure someone aware you are there. Movement should not be restricted as this could cause manual handling injury or muscle injury due to poor positioning. 

2.2 Describe the organisational security procedures for site security procedures for tools, equipment, and personal belongings in relation to site, workplace, company and operative

2.2 Organisational security procedures are there to maintain the security of site, tools, equipment and personal belongings, workplace, company and operative.   They are available in many forms. All sites should be safe and locked when not in use, general public should not be able to access. If visitors do need to access in the day they should be seen at the site entrance office and not allowed to just enter unknown. Full PPE should then be provided as required. All tools and equipment should be stored safely and locked away when not in use, storage containers with sturdy locks should be made available. Tools and equipment left out can be very dangerous. Employees should be encouraged not to bring personal belongings on site, as a cluttered site is a dangerous one, however if they do it should be locked up and stored safely and securely. This provision should be available to employees. There should be a sign in and out book for all sites, all procedures should be available and followed, there are often site cabins available for personal storage and van checks can be carried out to ensure theft is not achieved. Each company will have its own procedures and employees should be informed of these as soon as they enter the site. 

2.3 Explain what the accident reporting procedures are and who is responsible for making reports.

2.3 Accident reporting procedures are available on all sites; all incidents and accidents should be reported immediately. If injury occurs, injured party should be given first aid as soon as possible by the site first aider, assistance to attend emergency department should be given if required. The incident should be entered into the accident book by the injured party if possible, or the site foreman if not. Site foreman should be informed as soon as possible of all injuries. 

2.4 This question has been answered in 3.7 and 3.8 in QCF 641. 

3.2 This question has been addressed in QCF 641 Q 1.4, 1.5. Gloves protect fingers from splinters, saw and blade injuries. Ear protectors reduce the damage caused by loud machines and tools. Head protection is used in case anything should fall over and hit head. Dust mask should be used when cutting wood to reduce inhalation of sawdust and fine dust from cutting materials. 

RPE and LEV should be used on site when working in confined spaces with dust and sawdust specifically to reduce inhalation. Joiner’s shops should have specific ventilation to assist with reduction of air pollutants. 

Collective PPE should be used at all times as specified. 

3.3 Describe how the relevant health and safety control equipment should be used in accordance with the given instructions.

3.3 All health and safety control equipment comes with manufactures use guidelines; these should be followed at all times. Instructions should be available at all times to staff. Staff should have appropriate training to ensure they know how to use correctly. 

If unsure or instructions not available seek advice. 

3.4 State how emergencies should be responded to in

accordance with organisational authorisation and

personal skills when involved with fires, spillages,

injuries and other task-related hazards

3.4 Personal response to hazards and incidences:  

Fires – Raise alarm first, fire should be tackled with appropriate fire extinguisher if small enough to make a difference and feel can do so. If you hear fire alarm and the alarm is continuous go to nearest fire exit, leave all tools and equipment. Make for the fire assembly point. 

If spillages found or occur, ensure aware of what the substance is first, if appropriate clean up with appropriate cleaning substances. Make the area safe, if floor wet ensure wet floor warning sign available. Ascertain where spillage is from and reduce further leakage/ Spillage. 

If accident occurs at work inform first aider. If serious injury stay with injured party and ring ambulance or get colleague to do so.  All accidents should be reported in accident/ incident book. Ensure foreman aware and informed. 

4.2 Describe the characteristics, quality, uses, sustainability, limitations and defects associated with the resources in relation to:

– timber, manufactured sheet material, prefabricated components, ironmongery, metals, sash cord, adhesives, sealants, guttering, downpipe, fixings and associated ancillary items– hand and/or powered tools and equipment.

4.2 

Characteristics Quality Uses Sustainability Limitations Defects

Timber Comes in Soft wood –Pine. Hard wood – oak, mahogany are the most used. Soft wood is soft and not known to be long lasting unless pressure treated. Both woods can be used for doors, windows, skirting etc hard wood long lasting and better for outdoor uses and durability. Both sustainable Soft wood requires pressure treating to last, both require treating to endure outside weather conditions Knots in wood can weaken the plank. Should be treated if present as they can bleed. Can also twist and bow if not stored correctly.

Manufactured sheet materials Known as MDF, internal and external ply, Come in different thicknesses and have different purposes. Boxing pipes in, flat roofs, Over boarding flooring

It is sustainable Does not have a very good finish unless veneered. Can be dangerous when cutting as causes dust. 

Prefabricated components Window frames and door frames, modular buildings Good for speed of completing jobs. Houses and buildings Yes Have to be pre measured and ordered. Twisting

Ironmongery Door handles window locks, screws fixings, window stays, door closers, locks etc Come in different metal finishes, stainless steel, brushed aluminium, brass. Different quality according to cost. For closing, locking and decoration of doors and windows. Can be used as scrap if not wanted and recycled. Quality is associated with cost. 

Finish is personal taste, though if used outdoors and long lasting would be best getting better quality. Check if all working prior to fitting. 

Metals As Above

Sash cord Rope for windows usually waxed finish. Come as standard For box sash windows on pulleys. NA Can snap and frey over time and often require replacing. Ensure no defects prior to fitting

Adhesives and sealants Bonding agents, waterproof sealing agents Can come in various qualities, fungal retardant waterproof sealants, Adhesives can come for the use with wood and for use with specific material. Adhesives used for sticking skirting boards in place, glueing sheet veneers. 

Sealants used for sealing round sinks, baths, windows and door frames. NA Can wear and shrink over time. Can dry if not stored correctly. 

Once opened need to be used within limited time.  

Guttering and down pipes Come in plastic, wood or composite. PVC plastic last longer, all come in different qualities. Wood ones are used for conservation and period properties. Assisting with drainage of water Sustainable Only used in specific types on specific properties. 

Different durability Holes, damaged pipes. Twisted.

Fixings and associated ancillary items Screws, nails, bolts, etc Come in different qualities and materials Screwing materials together, nails for holding materials together. Yes Have to use right product for the right job, not necessarily interchangeable uses. Can be bent, not finshed correctly, check for defects before use. 

Hand or power tools Drill, planer, sander, Circular saw etc Come in different makes and qualities. Tools used by skilled tradesman need to be of a better quality for sustained use. For speed of completing work and making the job easier. They have progressed from many hand tools. Some parts are. Can be repaired by having parts added or replaced Batteries run out, leads split, motors burn out, brushes require changing. Ensure no defects pre use, check dry and wires not split. Any guards must be present. 

4.3Answered in QCF 641 Q 4.3

4.4 Answered in QCF 641 Q 4.4

4.5Answered in QCF 641 Q 4.5

4.6 Answered in QCF 641 Q 4.6

5.4 Answered in QCF 628 Q 5.4

5.5 Answered in QCF 628 Q 5.5

6.2 Answered in QCF 641 Q 6.3

7.7 Describe how to apply safe work practices, follow procedures, report problems and establish the authority needed to rectify them, to:

– splice and replace frames and mouldings

– repair and replace doors and windows

– repair and replace ironmongery

– repair or replace guttering, downpipes

– replace sash cords

– replace architraves, skirting, dado rails and picture rails

– form joints associated with repairs

– use hand tools, power tools and equipment

– work at height

– use access equipment.

7.7 

Safe working practices Follow Procedures Report problems Establish Authority required to rectify.

Splice and replace frames PPE should be worn, all collective PPE should be considered if working from heights. Remove damaged piece, cut and remove at 45 degrees cut new splice to fit. Glue and or screw back in place with new piece. Any problems should be reported Site manager would be next in authority to report to. 

Repair and replace doors and windows As Above Remove door and windows. Replace with new and make good to any surrounding damaged area. Ensure site tidy. Report problem to site manager or customer. If manufacture fault with door or window inform manufacturer. Site mgr/Customer/ manufacturer.

Repair and replace ironmongery PPE 

Follow instructions of what is required. Remove old damaged ironmongery and replace with repaired or replacement Problems should be reported to manufacturer or retailer.

Inform site manager or customer As above

Repair and replace guttering and downpipes PPE and collective PPE. Ensure safe working height, use harness and hard hat. Scaffold if required. If on ladder ensure tied off at the top. Angle no more than 75%. Remove old materials, replace with new,

Ensure securely fastened in place. ensure all waste removed safely. As above As above

Replace sash cords Goggles and gloves. Remove box sash and remove staff bead. Remove wooden fillet at bottom window to reveal lead weight. Drop moues down back window, connect to lead weight, Remove any salck and staple sash cord to sash. Connect all back in place As Above As Above

Replace architraves, skirting, dado rails and picture rails PPE to be worn. Remove and replace As Above As Above

Form joints associated with repairs PPE Remove old material, cut 45 degree mitre glue and nail back on. Pin mitre. As Above As Above

Use hand tools, power tools and equipment PPE To be worn at all times Check for any damage pre use. Keep maintained at all times. Ensure trained and competent to use. Inform site manager if any problems, see manufacturer if any problems within warranty. As Above

Work at height-Using access equipment PPE head protection, harness, scaffold, tied ladder.

Collective PPE should be considered. Look out for overhead cables.   Ensure appropriate height lifting equipment used for the height being worked at and securely in place. Must be PASMA trained and competent to use. Inform site manager if any concerns or problems Site manager

 7.8 Describe the needs of other occupations and how to effectively communicate within a team when maintaining non-structural carpentry work.

When setting up and using powered transportable cutting and shaping machines it is important the team know how to effectively communicate and understand the needs of other occupations. This can be achieved by ensuring all aware of site management requirements, plans of completion and deadlines for each part of the job. Training sessions should be made available for all employees, toolbox talks should be held regularly and employees should be encouraged to attend. All machines should be pat tested, and within date. Each occupation has its own hazards, requirements, risks and timescales and all site staff should be made aware of them and updated regularly as situations change.  All communication across different occupational teams should be polite and clear.

7.9 Describe the methods of sharpening the hand tools used when maintaining non-structural carpentry work.

They should be sharpened as per manufacturer’s instructions following the RAMS provided for the purpose.

7.10 Describe how to maintain the tools and equipment used when maintaining non-structural carpentry work.

These should only be used for the purpose foe what they were manufacturer for. They should be used as the manufacturer’s recommendations and the RAMS provided. Many tools require training to use effectively.

QCF09Av2 Installing First Fixing Components in the Workplace.

09 1.3 met in 12 1.3

09 1.4 met in 12 1.4

09 2.1 met in 12 2.1

09 2.2 met in 12 2.2

09 2.3 met in 12 2.3

09 2.4 met 12 2.4

09 2.3 met in 12 2.3

09 4.2 met in 12 4.2 

09 4.3 met in 12 4.3

09 4.4 met in 12 4.4

09 4.5 met in 12 5.5

09 4.6 met in 12 4.6

09 5.4 met in 12 5.4

09 5.5 met in 12 5.5

09 6.1 met in 12 6.2

09 7.6 met in 12 7.6

09 7.7 met in 12 7.7

09 7.8 met in 12 7.8

09 7.9 met in 12 7.9