History of wireless telegraphy and broadcasting in Australia/Topical/Stations/6KX Perth/Notes

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6KX Perth - Transcriptions and notes[edit]

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BIRTH ca November 1905 Harry Simmons was born[1]

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COMMONWEALTH PUBLIC SERVICE. Examination No. 855. For Appointment as Telegraph Messenger. Held 10th January, 1920. THE candidates named hereunder were successful at the above examination, and have thereby qualified for appointment to the position of Telegraph Messenger at the places under which their names respectively appear. The following should be noted:— (1) The names will remain on the Register of Qualified Candidates for eighteen months, that is, until and including 12th August, 1921, when they must, in accordance with the law, be removed therefrom. (2) A candidate, though successful, cannot be appointed after he attains his sixteenth birthday. (3) A candidate passes this examination if he secures at least half marks each in Handwriting and in Spelling; but those who have also gained half marks in Arithmetic at this examination will, if appointed, be eligible for promotion to a higher position in the General Division without further examination. (4) Those who have not secured at least 100 marks in Arithmetic will be required to pass a further examination in that subject after appointment, in order to become eligible for promotion. Promotion examinations are held half yearly. (5) Unless a Telegraph Messenger qualifies for promotion to a higher position before reaching the age of eighteen years, he must retire from the Service on attaining that age. (6) Where two or more candidates secure the same number of marks, their order of merit is determined by the number of marks obtained for (a) Arithmetic, and (b) Handwriting; and where these numbers are also equal then by ballot. (7) Upon appointment, a successful candidate must produce evidence of the date of his birth, and a medical certificate satisfying the Commissioner in whatever particulars he may determine as to the appointee's sound bodily health and freedom from physical defects. A successful candidate should not undergo medical examination until instructed by the Commissioner to do so. (8) Upon application being made by a successful candidate appointed away from home, an allowance at the rate of £12 per annum will be paid during his services as Telegraph Messenger while living away from home. (9) Before a successful candidate who is liable for training under the compulsory clauses of the Defence Act 1903-18 can receive appointment, he must produce evidence from his Area Officer that he has rendered the personal service required, or has been granted a temporary exemption. (10) Where a successful candidate for appointment at Sydney and Suburbs, Adelaide and Suburbs, or Perth and Suburbs, does not reside within a reasonable distance of a suburban office at which a vacancy exists, the Commissioner reserves the right to appoint another boy, who, though having obtained less marks at the examination, resides in closer proximity to the post-office referred to. (11) If a successful candidate decline to accept an appointment offered to him, or fail to reply within seven days to a communication from the Commissioner or a Public Service Inspector, respecting his nomination to the Public Service, his name may be removed from the "Register of Qualified Candidates." (12) Should a successful candidate change his address, he should immediately notify the Secretary, Commonwealth Public Service Commissioner, Customs-house, Melbourne. Name, Maximum Marks, Pass Marks. Handwriting: 100 50; Spelling: 150 75; Arithmetic: 200 -; Total: 450 -. Simmons, Henry Trethowan. 65, 150, 100, 315. W. B. EDWARDS, Acting Commissioner, H. McTAGGART, Acting Secretary.[2]

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BIRTH 17 December 1920 Elizabeth Paston Simmons formerly Roots nee Mack, 2nd wife of Harry Simmons was born.[3]

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COMMONWEALTH PUBLIC SERVICE. Examination No. 947. For Appointment as Junior Mechanic in Training, Western Australia, and Tasmania. Held 12th March, 1921, and subsequent dates. THE candidates named hereunder were successful at the above examination, and have thereby qualified for appointment during the ensuing period of eighteen months, viz., until the 4th November, 1922. The following should be noted:— (1) Where two or more candidates secure the same number of marks, their order of merit is determined by the number of marks obtained for (a) Arithmetic, and (b) Handwriting, and, where these numbers are also equal then by ballot. (2) No marks are credited in an optional subject unless the number awarded is at least 50 per cent. of the maximum allotted. Where the marks awarded in an optional subject are less than 50 per cent. of the maximum, they are enclosed in brackets, and are not included in the candidate's total marks. (3) A successful candidate is not eligible for appointment until he attains the age of 16 years, nor after he attains the age of 17 years. (4) Upon appointment, a successful candidate from outside the Service must produce evidence of the date of his birth and a medical certificate, satisfying the Commissioner in whatever particulars he may determine, as to the appointee's sound bodily health and freedom from physical defects, but he should not undergo medical examination until instructed by the Commissioner to do so. He will also be required to assure his life in accordance with the regulations. (5) Appointment will be subject to the appointee entering into an undertaking with the Chief Officer that he will, if required, attend both day and evening classes as part of his training in the work of a Mechanic. A Junior Mechanic (in training) who is not regarded as efficient in his work may, at any time, be transferred to another position in the General Division at such salary as the Commissioner may determine. Appointees will be trained in the work of electrical mechanics in the telephone and telegraph sections of the Department. (6) Before a successful candidate who is liable for training under the compulsory clauses of the Defence Act 1903-1918 can receive appointment, he must produce evidence from his Area Officer that he has rendered the personal service required, or has been granted a temporary exemption. (7) If a successful candidate decline to accept an appointment offered to him, or fail to reply within seven days to a communication from the Commissioner or a Public Service Inspector respecting his nomination to the Public Service, his name may be removed from the "Register of Qualified Candidates." (8) Should a successful candidate change his address, he should immediately notify the Public Service Inspector of his State. Name: Maximum Marks, Pass Marks; Handwriting: 100, 50; Spelling: 150, 75; Arithmetic: 200, 100; Sheet Metal Work: 100, 50; Wood Work: 100, 50; Total Marks: 550. WESTERN AUSTRALIA. Perth and Suburbs: . . . Simmons, Henry Trethowan 70, 81, 110 .. 0 261. * Candidate is an officer of the Commonwealth Public Service. W. B. EDWARDS, Acting Commissioner. H. A. EARL, Acting Secretary.[4]

MELBOURNE, Saturday. . . . The following candidates were successful in the March examination for appointment as junior mechanics in training in the Postmaster-General's Department in West Australia:— John William Zelling, Norman George Logan, Reginald Cecil Lee, John Allan Ackland, Noney Hugh King, Harold Edward Woodhead, George Hunter McAllan, Jack Alfred Iverson, Norman Hughes Hart, Clifford Best Naunton, Owen Thomas Jones, James Marshall, Robert Gordon Agnew, Harold Joseph Elliot, Gordon James Mulqueeny, Ernest Edward Thomas Hancock, Clarence Victor Philp, Clarence Richard Kruger, Thomas John Jewell, Thomas Theodore Copeland, Anton Luke Frederick, Harry Reverly Elliot, Leonard Charles Smith, Ernest Franklin Somerville, Haydon Wood, Frederick Sydney Kirby, Peter Leslie Hall, Edgar Herbert Pether Long, Albert Edgar Harris, Thomas Francis O'Loughlin, Frederick Edward Stahl, Horace Leslie Williams, Joseph Robert Gaunt, Henry Trethowan Simmons, Arthur George Finch, Gordon Roy Paterson.[5]

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COMMONWEALTH PUBLIC SERVICE. Melbourne, 23rd February, 1922. THE undermentioned notifications of Staff changes, &c., are made in accordance with the Commonwealth Public Service Act and Regulations:— . . . POSTMASTER-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. Ex. Mins. Nos. 73, 74, 75, 76, 78, 79. . . . Western Australia. . . . Appointments Confirmed.— Telephonists — Annie Dorothy Alice Winton and Thelma Elsa Louisa Ramm, Cottesloe, from 23rd June, 1921. Telegraph Messengers — Thomas Marshall Dalziel and Henry Trethowan Simmons, Telegraph Branch, from 1st June, 1921; Frank Gordon Graham, Northam, from 3rd June, 1921; Sydney John Allan Beckwith and Joseph Gladstone Eddy, Telegraph Branch, from 4th June, 1921; Edmund Ramplin Murphy, Goomalling, and Henry King Taylor, Norseman, from 15th June, 1921.[6]

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COMMONWEALTH PUBLIC SERVICE. THE undermentioned Staff changes are notified in accordance with the Commonwealth Public Service Act 1922 and Regulations thereunder:— PROMOTIONS — SECTION 50 (1) AND (3) AND REGULATION 109. The following promotions are provisional and subject to appeal by officers and, where consequent upon another provisional promotion, shall be subject to the latter being confirmed:— Postmaster-General's Department - Continued . . . Western Australia. . . . Name: Simmons, Henry Trethowan; Present Designation & Classification: Telegraph Messenger; Position to which Promoted: Messenger, Telegraph Branch; Salary on Promotion: 102 Pounds; Date of Promotion: 12.06.24. . . . C. B. B. WHITE, Chairman, Public Service Board of Commissioners.[7]

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WIRELESS MESSAGES. FROM PITTSBURG AND MOSUL. A few "listeners-in" reported that they heard the concert broadcasted from station "K.D.K.A.," at Pittsburgh (U.S.A.) last Wednesday evening, between 6 and 7 (Perth time). Mr. W. R. Phipps and Mr. H. Simmons, both of Subiaco, said that they received the broadcasted programme on two-valve sets, with a 63 metres wavelength. The music was loud but indistinct. They heard the programme continuously, except when the sounds "faded" for a few seconds at a time. The speeches (by prominent Americans) did not come through so clearly. Mr. P. Lindsay, of 45 Tower-street, Leederville, stated that he received messages on January 25 and January 26 from "HHQ" station, in Mosul (Mesopotamia), some 8,000 miles distant. He also received messages from several stations on the Pacific coast of America and from two stations in New Zealand. He was working on two valves. When receiving from "HHQ" on January 26 the sounds were far stronger than on the previous day, although "6WF" — the Perth station — was working and caused a considerable amount of interference. On Monday last Jack Watson, a young student at the Christian Brothers' College, "picked up" the first of the Pittsburgh concerts on a three-valve set, using one valve as a detector, and two for audio frequency. Orchestral selections, a saxophone solo, and a Press item were distinctly heard.[8]

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BROADCAST PROGRAMMES. The following wireless programmes will be broadcasted from 6WF (the Westralian Farmers, Ltd.) during the week ending. Friday, March 13. Programmes are subject to any alteration owing to unforeseen circumstances:— . . . FRIDAY, MARCH 13. 3.30-4.30. concert from Messrs. Boans Ltd. Roof Garden Tearooms; 8.10. Mr. Poole will give a short talk; 8.40. Mr. Simmons, Subiaco Radio Society, on "Short Wave Reception"; 9.0. Prince of Wales Theatre Orchestra, under direction Mr. Fred. Payne.[9]

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By LONG WAVE. Mr. Simmons' lecturette on short waves proved of an instructive and interesting nature. It is safe to predict that every home will have its low loss set in the near future. It has surprised me that commercial enterprise has not entered into the field and marketed complete receivers.[10]

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The Broadcast Listener. Official Organ for Affiliated Radio Societies. (By "Chris, T.L."). THE WIRELESS EXHIBITION AN EXCELLENT DISPLAY. Interviewed at the close of the Radio Exhibition, which ran for three evenings, and one afternoon, the president of the Wireless Institute (Mr. B. M. Holt) and the members of the committee of the Wireless Development Association expressed their entire satisfaction at the success of the exhibition, which they said had created a high standard for future displays. One feature of the exhibition which must have struck the observant inquirer was the absence of the low loss short wave sets. It was afterwards learned that while the amateurs did not mind lending their experimental and broadcast listening-in sets, they were so keen on short wave work that they felt they had to have something to amateurs did not mind lending their exhibition. Perhaps, too, there was a little jealousy about exhibiting their circuits to the world. One notable set in the low-loss type was a 5 metre set used by Mr. G. A. Moss, of the Fremantle Radio Society. Owing to mishap, Mr. R. D. Thompson, of the University, did not lecture on Saturday night as originally arranged. In his place, Mr. A. E. Stevens, technical adviser to the Wireless Institute, spoke upon the progress of wireless and the history of the Wireless Institute since 1911. During the evening musical items were rendered by Mrs. J. Evans, Miss L. M. Lorden, Mr. H. M. Holt, and Mrs. M Wilkinson. Mr. Holt, assisted by Mr. Bold, again gave the high frequency display. Prize Winners. The following prizes were awarded:— Class 1: Sets constructed from home-made material — Mr. Harvey (Donnybrook Radio Society), 1; Mr. Lawrance (Subiaco Radio Society), 2. Mr. Harvey's set was made of local timbers wherever wood could be used, while many of the other parts had been built in the home workshop. Mr. Lawrence's set was a portable one, enclosed in a medium sized suit case and complete with loud speaker. Class 2: Sets that could be easily connected in different circuits — Mr. H. Simmons (Subiaco Radio Society), 1; Mr. A. E. Stevens (W.I.A.), 2. Class 3: Best interclub display — Subiaco Radio Society, 1; West Perth-Leederville, 2. Class 4: Set constructed irrespective of cost from bought parts — Mr. B. Randell (Mt. Lawley Radio Society), 1. Mr. W. E. Coxon, technical adviser to 6WF, who acted as judge, confessed that in some instances he had experienced great difficulty in coming to a decision as to the best set.[11]

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1925 09[edit]

On 12 September 1925, Harry Simmons of 75 Nicholson Rd., Subiaco was issued with Amateur Operator's Certificate of Proficiency No. 181 by the Postmaster-General's delegate. The allocated callsign was 6KX which he held until his passing in 1985, except for a brief period of his residence in Victoria 1927/1928 (VK3XK).

BROADCAST PROGRAMMES. The following wireless programmes will be broadcasted from 6WF (the Westralian Farmers, Ltd.) during the week ending Friday, September 18. Programmes are subject to any alteration owing to unforeseen circumstances. . . . Friday, September 18. 12.30 to 2.0, Markets, news, cables, and weather report. Selections by the Studio Orchestra. 3.30 to 4.0. Pianoforte selections by Mr. Ron Moyle, A.T.C.L. 7.50, Radio talk by Mr. J. Simmons, of the Subiaco Radio Society. Miss Anona Wynne, soprano (late of the Theatre Royal). Mr. David Lyle, tenor, (late of the Theatre Royal). "A Spirit Flower" (Stanton). "In an Old Fashioned Town" (Squire). "The Blind Ploughman" (Clarke). "Maiden Mine" (Bennett). Mr. H. T. Newton, violinist. Pianist, Miss Gladys Orchard, L.A.B. 8.50, "Gardening Notes" by Mr. E. A. Hughes.[12]

1925 10[edit]

Wireless Week By Week. . . . 6AB Kalgoorlie is now on 85 metres, and doing very excellent work, inasmuch as his high tension supply is derived only from the town electric mains. 6GL had the misfortune to burn out a pair of 15 watters. 6KX is putting cut a good strong signal using dry cells for high tension. As he draws 30 milliamperes from them we imagine they will be "dry" very shortly. 6MU is very strong and almost up to the strength of 6CJ. The latter appears to be in recess, whilst the other local transmitters have apparently sold their gear, or turned BCLs.[13]

MERELY ATOMS. FROM HERE AND THERE. The Subiaco Radio Club's transmitter is practically completed, and will shortly be given a test. It is hinted at that an official opening night is to be held. Mr. Harry Simmons, of Nicholson-road, Subiaco, has recently been granted a transmitting licence. He is now heard on the air with the call sign 6KX.[14]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-in Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . Two new transmitters come on the air, 6GL (Mr. G. Lorden) and 6KB (sic, 6KX) (Mr. H. Simmons). Both have been fairly active and give promise of becoming some of our most consistent workers in the DX field.[15]

Wireless Week by Week. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-in Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . Short wave activities, during the previous week have been as virile as ever. Local transmitters have been spurred on to greater Dx records by 6AG's record in working no less than five countries, totalling an aggregate of some 38,000 miles, which, it will be admitted, is no mean distance for an amateur transmitter using limited power. We are extremely pleased that 6AG was the first West Australian to achieve the honor of working America, his success was so well deserved, as without question he is our most expert amateur, and has largely contributed to successful broadcasting in the West. FB, OM. Next in order comes 6KX, who is doing some excellent work with a 201A and 120 volts dry battery H.T. supply. The consequent pure D.C. note eclipses anything we have yet tuned in. The signals lack nothing in strength, but the Q.R.H. is a bit high to be Q.S.O. with the East. 6MU is garnering Q.S.L. cards galore and finds no difficulty in spanning the continent. He is contemplating the 40 metre band now. 6BN is thinking likewise. 6GL lacks nothing in strength, but the note wants the rough edges pruning. 6BB gets Q.S.O. with 6GP (across the narrows); his receiver did the trick. 6CJ is busy. 6AM entertained 6BO and opened the latter's eyes as to what a silent background in reception means. You hear the signal and nothing else, not even an "atmo." Distant transmitters using a watt or so congratulate 6AM on his F.B. receiver, and we hasten to add ours. 6BN is mildly active, whilst 6WP is exploring on 40 metres with an amp. radiation. 6BO does a little now and then but reckons he has no spare time now.[16]

1925 11[edit]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-in Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . Our weekly short wave report is mainly a record of QRN, and very little amateur activity. The Eastern Staters are very quiet and there has been very little doing on the 90 metre band, there being only one or two desultory transmissions, 2ZN, 7PF, 3QH, being the only stations operating with any degree of regularity, and in all cases signal strength appears to be much weaker. Locally things are not at all lively, 6AG is away, whilst 6BO is indifferent to DX work. 6WP is building a new high tension transformer, with a guaranteed output of one kilowatt and is on the lookout for kilowatt valves. The prevailing epidemic for transformers has overtaken 6MU and a Z11B with 1500 volts will shortly be in operation. 6CJ, he of the pure QSB, is having trouble. His key having rusted through lack of use, and 6BN must have turned broadcast listener, but he was heard during the week for a brief period. Good pure notes are the ambition of all of us, and 6AM has developed one that closely rivals 6KX, who uses battery high tension, and by the way, puts out some good fone.[17]

"OUT INTO SPACE" THE CALL OF THE AMATEUR. As Explorer of the Ether. . . . 6AB, Kalgoorlie has been coming in at good strength, but 6VK has evaded us so far. Quite a number of new transmitters are waiting on the issue of call signs, and the Subiaco society promises something special when they get going. Mr. H. Simmons (6KX) is more than pleased with his Reinartz low losser, as during the week he was successful in logging the transmission of an amateur located on the east coast of England, and who was carrying out tests with a South African confrere. A local wireless authority who has been holidaying in the country tells us the reception of 6WF during daylight hours is all that could be wished for, but as soon as the sun sets atmospherics appear and though the Farmers' comes in at increased strength, it is impossible to get clear reception owing to the static barrage. Users of Ducon plugs can get reasonable satisfaction with a local station, but the erection of an efficient outside aerial is well worth the trouble. 5CL Adelaide is still coming in quite well locally, and 3LO Melbourne is now using 5 kilowatts and is quite easily logged. There are quite a number of other broadcasters who can be tuned in when using an aerial, but beyond the capabilities of the Ducon.[18]

1925 12[edit]

WESTRALIAN FARMERS LIMITED. BROADCASTING STATION (6.W.F.) Wave Length, 1250 Metres. Following are the programmes, subject to alterations, for week ending December 27:— . . . 6WP and 6KX are still winding transformers. Miles of wire on the secondary side is the trouble, and the consequent voltage is not going to be placed on a 201A. A 250 watter is the lure. We persistently tried to log 3LO and 5CL during the week, but could do no better than get a strong carrier. Speech appeared to be very heavily modulated, and it seems impossible to split the carrier wave. Is our experience general? 6BO and 6AG have both worked F1 8LBT, who is Senor Lambert, 146 Zia Rue, Lefebre, Saigon, Indo-China. By the way he is a very courteous gentleman, as he addressed 6BO, when he gained touch with him, as "My dear Old Man" and 6AG equally as affectionately with "My Dear Friend."[19]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. 6KX (Mr. H. Simmons) is on 40 metres, and Q.S.L.'s will be appreciated.[20]

1926[edit]

1926 01[edit]

DOINGS OF THE AMATEURS. A Quiet Time Just Now. Local transmitters are on the quiet side, which is to be expected when Q.R.N. allows only the strongest signals to be heard. There are now three or four of the sixes on 40 metres, but 6AG and 6BO appear to be the only active ones. Nothing has been heard of 6CJ for months, but we believe a 40 metre set will soon be on the air, 6GL is moderately strong on 85, whilst NAM was heard for a moment on 40, with a strong and pure QSB. 6KX's transformer delivers the voltage necessary, for a 100 watter but places it on a DV5. The said DV5 does everything but meet, and passes about 60 milliamps. 6MU is still after the 40 metre band, but didn't stay there when he was plumb on it.[21]

AMATEUR ACTIVITY. What Local Stations are Doing. . . . 6KX and 6WP nightly carry out interstreet DX, but the distance is to be increased. The latter station has been QSO with the East, but is not enamored with the agility they show over there in answering Westralian amateurs' calls. Our own experiences shows there is room for vast improvement in this direction. Why contact with an interstate amateur should be passed over in favor of working a more distant one who has probably been QSO dozen times before is beyond our comprehension.[22]

AMONG THE AMATEURS. A Bright Week. The week has been a bright one in many respects, and the writer has heard more sixes on the 40 metre band than has ever been observed previously. The reason for the activity is not due to a plethora of DX transmission as very few of our neighboring inter-nationals have been doing anything at all, which is rather unfortunate, as this did not allow any of the locals having a fair chance in gaining contact. Amongst the newcomers on forty we heard 6KX, 6LS, and 6BN, each coming with fair strength locally, and they should have no difficulty in get-ting their signals heard outside Australia. We enjoin the amateurs once they get an indication they are in the neighborhood of 40 meters, not to alter the tuning in any way, if the radiation appears not to be all it should be, but persevere with CQ's and await reports. It will not be denied that it is not the slightest use varying the tuning from 45 to 30 in a succession of seconds, as no receiver will be able to anticipate your adjustments and of course, results in a state of things which means no reports. A mention in these columns is a reliable indication that you have been heard on the favored band, but wave variations every second during transmission are beyond the ability of even the astutest of mind readers to copy.[23]

WESTRALIAN FARMERS LIMITED. BROADCASTING STATION (6.W.F.) Wave Length, 1250 Metres. Following are the programmes, subject to alterations, for week ending January 24: . . . The following W.A. transmitters were heard on 40 metres during the week, 6AG, 6WP, 6BO, 6MU, 6KX, 6LS, 6BN, and YHM (m.s. Kangaroo). This is a healthy sign that our local experimenters do not lack appreciation of the superiority of the very short waves for DX working. Owing to the popular demand for details of the short wave Reinartz circuit, we propose commencing a series of instructional talks on this type of circuit. The first instalment commences in this issue and itemises the necessary components required. Circuit diagrams and drawings will follow in subsequent issues.[24]

Wireless Week by Week. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-in Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . One naturally expected a slump in DX working during the hot spell, in view of the necessity of tightly clamping the head 'phones on and keeping all doors closed to ensure the silence necessary for picking up that faint and elusive signal. However, even such physical disadvantages did not deter the local short wave experimenters, as every time we listened in there was 6AG, 6KX, 6LS and 6MU, all heroically striving for DX. We suppose, like ourselves, they forget all about the oppressive atmosphere in the endeavor to contact with that Yank who glibly replies he is sitting it out through intense cold and finds the radiator isn't even warming the radio shack.[25]

1926 02[edit]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . 6KX (Mr. H. Simmonds, of Messrs. Boans radio department) has success-fully worked a pair of American ama-teurs, namely, U6RN and U4UA. A wave length of approximately 40 metres was used. This is a very creditable performance, as Mr. Simmonds is only using a very moderate power, about 30 watts. However, further honors were achieved during the week, when the Japanese broadcasting station, JOAK, was tuned in. The transmissions were not received direct, but through J1PP, a Japanese amateur who was relaying the broadcast from his experimental station, using a wave of 37 metres. English G2NM was also heard carrying out 'phone work with HVA, in French Indo-China.[26]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. 6MU has joined the surfers and is studying wave motion in respect to currents and other phenomena. N.B: Sea waves, not wireless. 6CJ is hereby congratulated on his recent marriage. May his future be one of happiness with increasing DX, stronger signals and no QRM. 6GL performs prodigious feats in converting bright emitters into dull splitters, and we understand handles 2000 volts with contemptuous ease. 6KX knows more about the Reinartz than John L. himself. A minute's talk with him would persuade anyone to build one of these popular circuits.[27]

A DAY ON THE RIVER. With the Subiaco Society. An excellently conducted event was undertaken by the above society last Sunday, when an excursion was made down the river, lunching and teaing at vantage spots. The launch Valhalla was chartered, and left Perth at 10 a.m., a halt being made at Nedlands to embark Mr. and Mrs. 6BO and family. A complement of about 70 were on board and comprised a happy gathering. A cruise was made up the Canning, the beauty of which was greatly appreciated. A call was made at Point Walter for lunch, and everybody looked lean and hungry. The hour was well spent, and lighter lunch baskets were taken aboard. The Valhalla then proceeded down stream to the Port, and a detour was made to the outer harbor, but the wave motion appeared too severe for inexperienced sailors, and a return was made to Bicton, where tea was partaken of and the main events of the day proceeded with the mystery race and sports. Messrs. Gray and Congdon so ably hid the 32 mystery exhibits that a good valve was nearly broken through being walked over so often. After this event, and when the bargaining had ceased, the races were proceeded with. The prizes consisted of valves and other useful accessories. The old stagers defaulted when they observed lithe and agile youngsters stripped to bathers ready to do battle against them (6BN, 6WP, 6BB, 6KX and others), so youth had it, and also the valves. The ladies' race provided a thrill, the backmarker winning easily, and incidentally gaining a good valve. Great credit is due to the organisers for a very successful event, as without question these social events are quite as necessary as more austere meetings and formal business. We would like to see the Institute and Subiaco combine for a similar event at Easter time.[28]

MERELY ATOMS. FROM HERE AND THERE. Mr. Harry Simmons, of station 6KX, has recently been remodelling his transmitter. He was successful in getting it to percolate on 20 metres although he adheres to 35 metres for working purposes. He hopes, however, to conduct tests shortly on this lower wave length which requires him to have only one turn of wire in the aerial inductance and two in the grid. Should experimenters hear him on the 20-metre wave length, he would be glad to receive reports of reception. Mr. Simmons made an interesting discovery while working on 20 metres. On the higher wave lengths he inserted a 40 watt electric lamp in series with the aerial. A dull glow only was visible. When the same experiment was conducted on the 20 meter wave length the lamp glowed sufficiently brightly to light up the room. It was also found that an ebonite clip within the field of the inductance became quite warm on the lower wave length while the set was oscillating, whereas no thermal change was observed when the wave length was higher.[29]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-in Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . 6WP, 6BO, 6KX and 6SR were visitors to Rockingham last week, but a brief stay made impossible the survey of the land from a wireless point of view. The Subiaco Club is holding another river picnic on Sunday, March 14. Tickets are now available, and a good number of useful prizes will be distributed amongst competitors in the various races.[30]

AMONG THE AMATEURS. Local Activities Continue Quiet. Locally things, are as usual quiet, and no one seems to be aspiring to DX honors. Perhaps one reason for the comparative quietness is the trouble most of the transmitters are having with their rectifiers. 6WP is leaning towards the "sink," and has one under construction, a predecessor broke down when it was asked to handle 4000 volts. At the moment 6KX does not appear to be enamored with the electrolytics, and 6MU is disgusted with them, but 6CJ goes merrily ahead. How he does it is beyond us. 6BO is an interested spectator and is varying from "sinks" to valves and "S" tubes daily, but as each receive a defamatory report when they are mentioned they are duly turned down. Meantime the high voltage transformer stands idle. 6WP's note forbids us from using straight AC. 6GM lost no time in getting on the air, and though signals are moderately strong, the QSB shows how difficult it is to smooth out 40 cycle sup-ply. 6AG has been doing very little with C.W. Morse, but his 'phone is getting out well, and 3BQ reports he had it on the loud speaker with good quality. We understand 6AG intends putting in a 2000 volt DC generator for supply to two 250 watt oscillators. This will about double power and also eliminate the AC ripple now prevalent. With this projected change he should be able to put 'phone over to England. 6GL is down too low on the wave band to do much good with indifferent receivers, and 6MU is heard only infrequently. 6BN is quiet, but has no trouble in raising a Philippine with a CQ. Considering this station's small voltage and consistent results obtained no further proof of efficiency is required. 6SR only have to wire up their transmitter and then for the fireworks, but as they fortunately managed to get the last five-watter in the State fuses are being fitted at every vantage point. 6VK and 6AB have not yet appeared on the 40-metre band. At least we haven't heard them.[31]

1926 03[edit]

"DULL EMITTERS". AMONG THE "6's." There was a good attendance at the meeting of the W. A. division of the Wireless Institute on Thursday evening last. The Federal Executive wrote stating that it was the opinion of the majority of the divisions and would therefore be accepted as a decision, that each division pay the expenses of its delegate to conferences, a per capita levy of 6d per annum to be made on divisions to cover administrative purposes of the Federal Council. Some comment was made that this decision would probably preclude Western Australia from ever being represented by other than proxy delegates, but the letter, however, was received without any formal protest being made. The Victorian Division wrote concerning the decision respecting delegates' expenses and offered to pay £5 annually towards the expenses of the smaller States should they send a delegate. It was decided to reply to the Victorian division expressing appreciation at their generous action. The Australasian Association for the Advancement of Science wrote inviting two representatives to attend the conference to be held in August next. It was decided to write for further particulars, concerning financial obligations and subjects which would interest members. It was announced that the Subiaco Radio Society had arranged to conduct a further river picnic on March 14. The Federal Executive wrote stating that it had been informed that a number of official "W.I." stations had not been answering when called for traffic. Mr. A. E. Stevens moved that any member of the Wireless Institute on hearing a call for "6WI" which is not answered, may take the message and relay it at first opportunity. This was agreed to. It was decided also to inform the Radio Transmitters' Society and to seek their co-operation. Mr. Stevens also moved that the Division write the Federal Executive stating that experimenters in this State received scant courtesy from Eastern States' experimenters. He said one might call the Eastern States for some time and not get a reply as long as a local call sign was used. If the call sign was deliberately disguised and Eastern States' experimenters thought it was an American experimenter, they immediately answered. This had occurred on more than one occasion. Mr. Simmons reported a similar experience, and seconded the motion, which was carried. A committee consisting of Mr. A. E. Stevens, W. Phipps, J. C. Park, and R. Turnor was appointed to go into ways and means for immediately rejuvenating interest in amateur wireless matters in this State. A motion of condolence was conveyed to Mr. E. Page, vice-president, upon the recent death of his father.[32]

Official Messge Book. The Wireless Institute has now issued an official message book. It is quite an imposing form and provides for original and duplicate, both of which are numbered. The usual traffic information regarding time, number of words etc. appears at the top of the form with space allowed after the printed words. In size it is a little smaller than the Commonwealth telegraph form and is printed on white paper. The copy seen, was a message from U7AY which had been relayed to 6AG and confirmed by post. There is a British wireless experimenter living in a foreign country who for various reasons, has to tread warily. Anyone working station XGBI can QSL him through G2XY, G2LZ or G5MO. It is reported that a new "6" is on the air in 6GM of Fremantle. His signals are stated to be about the same strength as 6LS and his wave-length is 36 metres. During the week past 6KX (Mr. Harry Simmons) worked New Zealand, the amateur there, being X1AX He reports that there was little work done on the 30-40 metre band with the Eastern States during the week. Mr. Bert Gray (6BO), who works quietly but consistently, has been in touch with ship station NEQQ during the week. This station is the United States' battle cruiser Beaver, which is at present located in Philippine waters. Mr. C. Darley (6CJ) has been active during the recent week, and is putting out a splendid note. He is reported to have been QSO the "Yanks" last week. A station giving the call sign WIZ has been coming in very strongly on Morse during the last week. This station, which has a pure D.C. note, is on about 43 metres, and is giving very strong signals. In fact, so strong are they that, if modulated speech would be successfully heard here. The station is frequently heard calling ABC.[33]

MERELY ATOMS. FROM HERE AND THERE. . . . Amateur station 6KX (Mr. Harry Simmons), of Subiaco, is to be congratulated on working two-way with America last night. This well-known experimenter has only won his right to transmit during the last three or four months and already has a number of radio-scalps in the belt. Last night he worked 4UA, situated in East Winterhaven, Florida, and 6JX in California. This is indeed "fine business" for the small amount of power employed.[34]

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. . . . Mr. H. Simmons, 6KX has again achieved further success in working American amateurs, when during the week a brace of Yanks were communicated with, one of whom was located in Florida on the eastern seaboard. 6KX was reported as strength 4, and a good steady note, a report from Sydney gave the strength of transmission as R8. Mr. Simmons is a comparatively new comer to the transmitters' ranks and his early successes are deserving of commendation.[35]

MERELY ATOMS. FROM HERE AND THERE. An amusing incident occurred between Mr. Harry Simmons, of Nicholson-road, Subiaco, and a New Zealand amateur Z2BX situated at Wellington. Mr. Simmons had called CQ, and the New Zealander came back with "Your note like an Italian." 6KX asked for an explanation of the comment. Because Italians were frequently fisherman, was it to be assumed that the note had a "hum," or was the note like the Italian lakes, "clear as crystal?" it was asked. The answer was "Fish O.M. Hi Hi like No. 10 sandpaper."[36]

LOW POWER WORK. 6KX ON SHORT WAVES. Even the amateur, who because of financial stringency frequently has to be satisfied with low power, is surprizing himself with what can be achieved in the field of radio communication with a few watts. 6KX, who is morely generally known as Mr. Harry Simmons, of Nicholson-road, Subiaco, has recently been doing some good DX work, and has also been working enthusiasts who have been using less power than goes through an ordinary electric light. Nightly since Wednesday he has been QSO with the United States, commencing on this night with U-601, the amateur station at the Brandon University in California. The next night he worked both U6HM and U-8XC. On Friday he connected with U4GY, who said the West Australian amateur's signals were good, and to send once only and faster. Communication was maintained for some time, both parties exchanging their QRA. 3TM in Melbourne was worked, his note being pure DC. One of the most surprising pieces of work was that of working with a portable set. While listening for South African amateurs on Wednesday Mr. Simmons heard station A3Y calling "CQ DX O," which interpreted means "General call to distant stations outside of South Africa." A reply was given and Mr. Innes, of Johannesburg, with a portable transmitter and using only a few watts of current, held a chat by telegraphy with Western Australia. Mr. Innes it is learned also operates under call sign O-A4E. O-A5X, another amateur in South Africa using the lighting mains as the source of his high tension supply, was also worked during the week. This amateur when he was first heard by the West Australian was talking with another South African, and said that as he was using very low power he didn't suppose his signals were going very far. It was quite clear, however, that they were reaching to Australia and possibly New Zealand. At 1 a.m. on Thursday the following South Africans were heard:— O-1SR, O-A4V, O-AITS.[37]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-in Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . Mr. N. Simmons, 6KX and of Messrs. Boans radio department has of late been carrying out some very creditable DX work on 35 metres, and only using a very moderate power input at 30 watts. American U601, U6HM, U8XC, and U4GY were communicated with and contact was also had during the week with the portable station A3Y in South Africa. Numerous American and South African amateurs were also heard working.[38]

1926 04[edit]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-in Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . 6KX (Mr. H. Simmons, of Subiaco) has been putting out some good phone on 40 metres during the previous week. Modulation was very good and the speech and music extremely clear and closely approaching that of 6AG. In fact, the volume was every bit as good. Unfortunately 6KX burnt out his 30 watter by accidentally putting more voltage through than was good for it but a replacement was handy and the Yanks were readily contacted with again.[39]

The Broadcast Listener. Official Organ of the Wireless Institute (W.A. Division) and the Affiliated Radio Societies. MERELY ATOMS. FROM HERE AND THERE. 6AG (Mr. W. E. Coxon) has returned from his trip North, when over 2,000 miles were covered. A good deal of information was obtained relating to the reception of the shortwave telephony transmitted from his residence. Mr. G. B. Sutherland carried out the duties of operator. 6KX (Mr. H. Simmonds) is now experimenting on telephony, and can be heard almost every evening on 35 metres. Mr. A. E. Greig (6BO) still continues to disturb the ether, and his signals, although weak locally, are reported at good strength in North India and the Philippine Islands. 6BB can also be heard on 40 metres, and would welcome reports on the reception of this C.W.[40]

MERELY ATOMS. FROM HERE AND THERE. Mr. Harry Simmons (6KX) on Thursday evening worked 1SR, an amateur station in Salisbury, Rhodesia. Signals were good and easily readable. The lecture by Mr. W. E. Coxon (6AG) was an unqualified success on Thursday. A splendid attendance turned up to hear this well-known wireless expert give his experiences on shortwave working, and its application to the "beam" system of transmission. Particulars of the lecture will be found elsewhere.[41]

1926 05[edit]

THE AMATEURS. And Their Activities. A surprising amount of work is now being carried out by local amateurs, and some very creditable and consistent transmissions have been done, especially by 6KX, who is obtaining very efficient results from his low-powered outfit. So far, he has been in touch with about 30 Americans; he has very little trouble in raising at least one or two each evening; his signals are variously reported up to R6, and considering he is only using a midget rectifier and baby filter system, his note is very clear and pure, closely approaching DC. During the past week some phone tests on 36 metres have been done. Locally the speech is crystal clear and much louder than 6AG's. A simple method of modulation is used by 6KX, the microphone being placed in the earth lead. His Reinartz receiver is also a model of efficiency and hauls in notoriously hard-to-get stations, as a diversion. It capably receives 3LO at loud speaker strength.[42]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . Mr. H. Simmons, of Messrs. Boans radio department and operator of the experimental station 6KX is receiving well deserved congratulations from distant transmitters on the excellence of his receiver. Many reports have been received lately that 6KX's report are the first intimations of the signals being received in W.A. A notable piece of work in this direction is the consistency with which Mr. Simmons logs South African amateurs, it being generally recognised that signals from this country's amateur transmitters are notoriously difficult to receive locally, though it is a matter of surprising ease with Mr. Simmons' tuner. The circuit used is the popular Zenith-Reinartz circuit, exactly similar in wiring to the type previously given in these columns. Two stages of audio are available, but for convenience one stage is quite sufficient. American amateurs come in with such volume that they can be easily copied on the typewriter. Phone from Japanese J1AA and English 2NM are two outstanding records. Morse signals are heard from practically all parts of the world.[43]

MERELY ATOMS. FROM HERE AND THERE. . . . Mr. W. Phipps, amateur station 6WP, has received a card from Mr. W. A. Trewenaek, 31 Gladston-road, Mile-End, Adelaide, stating that he heard 6WP and 6KX (Mr. H. Simmons) at good strength on a certain night recently. 6WP says he is unable to account for this report, as at the time in question his set was barely oscillating. Is there here another of the peculiarities of wireless awaiting the research fiend? Mr. H. Simmons (6KX) has just received another bunch of QSL cards. They include two from Kansas, U.S.A., where he is given R5, Indianopolis with R4, U-9UI (Junior Bishop, Sedalia, Mo.), PI-3AA (F. Johnson Elser, Manila), EIPK7 (C. Hilling, Samarang, Java), U-60B and WVY (Signal Corps U.S. Army, San Francisco, California), U-3LW (N. A. Robinson, Philadelphia). A3TM (A. H. Buck, Glenhuntly), operating from Seymour military camp, using electric light mains for supply, reported 6KX at R7, and coming in with "wonderful punch." There was also a handful of other Australian cards.[44]

AMATEUR ACTIVITIES. Miles per Watt Test. There has been a marked increase in amateur working locally and else-where, this being due to the final tuning up preparatory to the contestants entering the lists prepared to do battle for the forthcoming miles per watt record and the gold watch. In reviewing the likely candidates the following seem to be most prominent:— 6AG is a big watt station, and already has a watch, so we can't put him down as a starter; 6BN has a very good chance, and he at present holds a very prominent miles per watt record. Unfortunately, he has not worked a Yank yet, but this is only a matter of convenience as his signals must be getting over. He uses a 202 five watter, and 300 volts motor generator; 6KX is using a bit too much power at present, and, though he consistently works Yanks, he will have to considerably drop his voltage and use a smaller power oscillator; his recent work shows the rest of his station to be in excellent order. Provided he can get out with a 201a the trophy is his. 6WP is a very variable factor, and would probably want to alter his wave length during the test, which would certainly tell against his success. His present Q.S.B. is very good, and strength excellent, and he should be Q.S.O. during the test, but miles per watt will prove a tough obstacle to a 3000 volt transformer. 6LS has already been Q.S.O. with a 201a, and if this can be repeated on the three necessary occasions he should be pretty close to success. 6BO is a silent worker, and he has a very handy motor generator giving 600 volts, that should get somewhere. Rumors say a dull emitter valve is going to replace the two ZllB's, and a general overhaul might place him in the running. 6MU is an unlikely starter owing to a reconstruction period, which is unfortutunate, as his previous work showed him to be in good form with small inputs. At present 6GL is minus an aerial, and if he can get over with a loop he will deserve consideration. 6CJ likes a lot of power, and, therefore, with 6AG becomes permanently disqualified. Of 6AB and 6VK, Kalgoorlie, very little seems to be heard, but they are both low-power experts, and therefore potential winners. To sum up the situation, we think 6KX, if he can satisfactorily get a low-power outfit going and still retain his consistency, will come that close to beating the rest of Australia that new miles per watt records will have to be established to win. Next to him 6BN is the most probable winner.[45]

1926 06[edit]

THE AMATEUR BAND. Advice on Local Activities. It was hoped with the coming of the long winter evenings and more favorable conditions generally for DX work, that there would be a revival amongst the amateurs, but somehow or another there is still a lack of the enthusiasm and activity which was manifest on the 80 metre band this time last winter. Locally, there is not a great number of amateur transmitters, a dozen at the outside; still one does not hear of any more than half a dozen who are actually working. The recently held low power tests should have afforded some incentive for general activity, but there was little or no increase. The difficulty experienced in raising the Eastern Staters certainly is not conducive to DX working, and there is not much fun to be gained by calling CQ all night and then get no response from other transmitters. This is made more annoying when a shoal of BCL cards come to hand intimating that the transmission in particular was strongly received. One amateur of our acquaintance, in remonstrating with an Eastern Stater about this obvious lack of courtesy, was politely informed that his receiver was only tuneable for the Yankee band. Such an admission as this — that it was no use tuning for other Australian stations, needs some justification. They like themselves to be called amateurs, but "meddlers" would be a better title. However, if the local stations are in need of a test, we recommend them to get in touch with ANDIR at Java. He is always willing to co-operate and can be relied upon for correct reports. Of the locals our most prominent, 6KX, has caught the reconstruction fever, and is now rebuilding for efficiency and appearance, with special thoughts to low power work. His receiver is still as good as ever and consistently brings in half a dozen Yanks nightly. We wish him look with his new transmitter. May an Englishman soon be on his DX list.[46]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. Quite a number of local amateurs can now be heard on phone on 40 metres. 6KX, 6WP, and 6BO were heard having a triangular contest one evening last week and the way in which each amateur spoke in turn would have been perplexing to a listener who was only hearing one of the transmissions. 6KX has attained a wonderful degree of efficiency with his phone, and listened to a few miles distant, it is the acme of purity and volume.[47]

The BROADCAST LISTENER. OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE WIRELESS INSTITUTE (W.A. DIVISION) AND THE AFFILIATED RADIO SOCIETIES. (by "Chris. T.L.") WIRELESS INSTITUTE ANNUAL MEETING ELECTION OF OFFICERS. The annual meeting of the W.A. Division, of the Wireless Institute of Australia was held at 6WF's Conference Hall on Thursday evening, when Mr. B. Holt presided over a satisfactory attendance. "Watts Per Mile." A letter was read from Messrs. L. P. R. Bean and Co., Ltd., regarding the "Jewell" "watts per mile" contest, stating:— "Owing to many amateurs not having had sufficient time to prepare their transmissions, we have decided to extend the closing time for one month. Tests will conclude July 5 instead of June 5. Log sheets to be sent to us before July 30, instead of June 30. Proof of reception to be sent in not later than September 15, instead of August 15. Trophy to be awarded September 20, instead of August 20. It is optional whether tests are made with oversea stations or between stations in Australia, so long as the distance between stations is over 500 miles. Public Lectures. It was announced that the following lectures would be delivered during the next three months:— June 24: Mr. G. Sutherland on "Progress of Wireless," at Technical School. July 22: Mr. B. Holt on "High Frequeney Electricity," at 6WF's Hall. August 26: Mr. W. G. Hayward (subject yet to be chosen), at 6WF's Hall. Treasurer's Report. As the auditors had not finished with the balance sheet, the hon. treasurer (Mr. F. Narroway) was only able to submit a statement of the division's finances. This disclosed that it had cost £40 9s 2d to finance the organisation during the year, leaving a credit balance of £23 6s 6d. Mr. Narroway stated that finances had improved 50 per cent. over those of last year, despite the fact that the accounts for the incorporation of the institute were shown in the statement presented. President's Report. The president (Mr. B. Holt), in his annual report, said:— "The work of the institute during this session, which is the sixth since the Great War, has been in one way equally as good as the previous sessions. "We have certainly not had as many lectures as I should like to have seen given, but we have had a tremendous amount of work to do. "There have been eight meetings of the Affiliated Radio Society of W. A., 14 general meetings, and three council meetings. The meetings of the affiliated societies were practically all held prior to the second annual convention, which took place in Perth in August, 1925. "This number does not include many which have been held by subcommittees. Generally speaking, the council and subcommittee have had a very busy time, and they have gone to no end of trouble in doing all they can to keep the radio clubs together, and to keep the status of the institute at a high level. They have not been so successful with the former as they have with the latter. "Lectures and Special Evenings: I am sorry to have to report, that there have, been only three lectures this year, and they, recently. It might be explained that important business arose from time to time which made it imperative that it should receive precedence over all other activities." "The following is the number of lectures given each year during my five years as president: 1921-22, 10 lectures; 1922-23, six; 1923-24, nine; 1924-25, 10; 1925-26, three. "We certainly have an excuse for this last year, because of the excessive amount of business and preparation for the convention. "We have now instituted what we might term monthly public lectures. These as you know have been a wonderful success, having an average of 60 people present. "The lectures were given by the following members: Mr. Stevens, Mr. Coxon, and Mr. Phipps, each of which were most interesting, and instructive, and had the effect of swelling our membership by many. We can now look ahead for big things in this respect. "Federal Convention: The second annual Federal Convention was held in Perth at the conference room, which was kindly lent by the Westralian Farmers, Ltd., for the purpose. "We got through a tremendous amount of good work. The local institute and affiliated bodies were able to give our visitors a real royal time. "Professor Ross kindly invited the delegates to visit the University, where tea was served prior to a visit to the various scientific lecture halls, where Professor Ross explained many of the experimental appliances. "On the Sunday many car loads of members paid a visit to the Mundaring Weir, and after dining at the Mundaring Hotel, a circular trip was taken in the cars round the weir. The Monday following we had our institute dinner and the visitors returned to the East on Tuesday." Membership. The total number of financial members is forty-one. We had numbers of unfin-ancial members, but they have been crossed off the roll. Incorporation. I am very pleased to report that the institute is just on the point of becoming an incorporated body; in fact we may say we are incorporated, for it is now only a matter of completing the formal application. This will put us on a proper legal footing. The New South Wales, Victoria, and Tasmanian institutes are, I believe, already incorporated bodies. Affiliated Bodies. Unfortunately many of the radio clubs have disbanded. The only clubs now in existence, I believe, are the Subiaco Radio Society, Victoria Park Radio Club, Fremantle, and the Mount Lawley-North Perth Radio Club. I have to thank Mr. Thompson, manager of Westralian Farmers, Ltd., for allowing the institute the use of their lecture hall for our meetings. I have also to thank Mr. Page, our vice-president, and Mr. Stevens, our technical adviser, and the members of the various committees for their great assistance. We all have to thank Mr. Park, our secretary, for the amount of work he has done for the institute generally. He has been an exceptionally, willing and good worker. Election of Officers. Balloting for the members of the council resulted in the following being elected: — Messrs. W. E. Coxon, F. Goldsmith, W. Phipps, B. Holt, A. E. Stevens, E. Page, H. Simmons, J. C. Park, W, Turnor. At a subsequent council meeting, the the following appointments to office were made:— President: Mr. B. M. Holt (reelected). Vice-presidents: Messrs. W. E. Coxon, E. Page. Secretary: Mr. A. E. Stevens. Assistant Secretary: Mr. J. C. Park. Treasurer: Mr. F. Narroway. Technical committee: Messrs. Coxon, Stevens, Phipps and Simmons. Publicity committee: Messrs. Stevens, Phipps, Goldsmith, and Simmons. Qualification committee: Whole council. Auditors: Messrs. W. Green and Enkel. Hon. president: Mr. J. Thomson. Hon. vicepresident: Mr. C. P. Knapton. Honorarium to Secretary. It was decided to make the hon. secretary (Mr. J. C. Park) an honorarium in recognition of the splendid work he had accomplished last year. After some discussion it was decided to secure a suitable gift for presentation later.[48]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . Mr. H. Simmons (6KX) after his recent reconstruction, lost no time in gaining contact with an American statlon. During the week 4XE, located down Florida way, was worked. 6KX was surprised at the strength of the Yank's signals, and a request to try phone was equally surprising, speech being clearly received. It was breaking daylight in America and this makes the achievement all the more noteworthy. Mr. Simmons is using the Zenith Reinartz circuit in his receiver.[49]

AMATEUR COMMENT. . . . 6KX continues to work Yankees, and is, without question, the most consistent and efficient sixer. He proposes installing a Milliard 150-watter shortly. This should bring him in touch with the rest of the amateur world. 6WP has already a 150-watter in operation, but he wandered off the wave length band somewhere, and we haven't located him since he changed over from the ZIB's. 6JC was heard, excellent strength; but Q.R.H. was varying all over the place. 6BO proposes a 100-watter to counter-effect 6WP and 6KX.[50]

REMARKABLE LOWER POWER WORK. EXPERIMENTAL STATION 6KX. The amateur 6KX, owned and operated by H. Simmons, of Subiaco, has recently been carrying out a series of successful bilateral communications on the short waves, and considering the small power used (about 20 watts), some remarkable distances have been spanned, and American amateurs are being worked regularly. In one case 6KX's signals were so strong that the Yankee amateur requested him to speed up and send once. Perhaps this is the surest indication that signals are arriving with some punch. The photo shown herewith depicts the station layout, the transmitter being to the right, while the short wave receiver is in the enclosed cabinet on the left. Power for the transmitter is derived from a step-up A.C. trans-former giving up to 3000 volts, but only a portion of this voltage is used. The supply is rectified by a bank of electrolytic rectifiers which give a fairly clear Q.S.B. A Phillips ZIIB 30-watter is used as the oscillator and gives a radiation of .6 of an ampere on 36 metres. Phone has been tried recently and a report from Adelaide remarks on it as good strength. Locally it is very clear and strong. The low loss tuner is a Reinartz and embodies the type of circuit shown on this page a fortnight ago. It is the last word in sensitiveness, as many as 30 amateurs in U.S.A. being logged in one evening. Phone from English 2GM has also been received and numerous South African amateur transmissions. Its range is practically world wide for short wave reception. An array of Q.S.L. cords is shown in the conventional wall paper fashion. Following are some of the most prominent American amateurs who have been contacted with:— 4UA, 4GY, 5UK, 6RN, 6JX, 6OI, 6HM, 8ALT, 8GZ, 9HP, 9AOA, 9CK.[51]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. OUR BUDGET OF BROADCASTING AND LISTENING-IN LYRICS — OF VALUE TO THE SEEKER AFTER KNOWLEDGE. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . 6KX, 6WP and 6BO are intending installing 100 waiters. Watts per mile contest evidently. . . . Mr. H. Simmons. 6KX, has been elected to the presidential chair of the Subiaco Society. The secretary is intending to have a brief respite from office cares during his sojourn in the country.[52]

1926 07[edit]

RANDOMS. 6KX — Mr. H. T. Simmons is again in the throes of reconstruction; this time with a Mullard 150. If results are proportionate to those obtained with the Z11B, there should be no spots left on the globe to work.[53]

MERELY ATOMS. FROM HERE AND THERE. Messrs. W. Phipps (6WP) and H. Simmons (6KX) have recently received call sign books giving addresses of most of the amateur transmitters in U.S.A., Canada, and other parts of the world. They are willing to give QRA'S to those not so fortunate as to have a call sign book. Three call signs heard on tbe air recently are:— 5BW, G. Phillips, 31 Partridge-street, Glenelg S.A.; 5LO, W. H. Barber, 50 Somerset-avenue, Cumberland, S.A.; 5PR, Port Radio Club, care of 5LF.[54]

MERELY ATOMS. FROM HERE AND THERE. . . . Mr. H. Simmons (6KX) hopes to be heard shortly with increased volume if he is successful in securing permission to use a 150 watt valve.[55]

1926 08[edit]

GRID BIAS FROM THE H.T. BATTERY. . . . 6KX and 6BO have been received by a Japanese amateur, and 6AG is reported in almost every English and American list of calls heard that comes to hand.[56]

The Broadcast Listener. MERELY ATOMS FROM HERE AND THERE. The first of the Wireless Institute lectures "for members only," takes place on Thursday, when Mr. Harry Simmons will speak on Short Wave Receivers. 6KX is well known in the local wireless world as an able exponent of the Reinartz cireuit and an interesting lecture can be looked forward to.[57]

A CORRECTED DIAGRAM. . . . 6KX and 6WP are mostly correct when they achieve success by altering the tuning condensers. Several others rely upon a choice of aerials. Now we know what all these aerials are for and 6BO complains his transmitter will function on a wave length of its own choosing and stubbornly refuses to oscillate elsewhere. 6BN, with a Reinartz circuit, has to adjust a quintet of condensers. Several of the others have just happened to lob on 40, and are thankful for their good fortune.[58]

6KX has a 150 watter in action, but N.S.W. is the best DX so far. Most nights he can be heard on 'phone, and whilst the tuning is very sharp, excellent volume and clarity is had locally. Most of the others seem to be rather quiet.[59]

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker After Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . There are many snares and delusions to confront the amateur who is starting transmission. One of the most common of these is an insistence for a high radiation reading on the aerial ammeter. It may be said that aerial radiation is, to say the least, very deceptive; and on the short waves should be treated warily and at most only taken as an indication of resonance between the aerial and closed oscillatory circuits. In support of this it might he mentioned that 6KX (Mr. H. Simmons), a local transmitter, was successful in working French Indochina, America and Australian States, without the slightest sign of radiation showing on the ammeter. Previously a radiation reading up to as high as .5 of an amp. gave no response from DX stations.[60]

MERELY ATOMS. FROM HERE AND THERE. Mr. Harry Simmons (6KX) has come to the conclusion that he still has a lot to learn about short waves. Although he was getting .8 of an amp. into the aerial he was apparently getting nowhere. A 30ft. high tree in a neighbouring yard was blamed tor some screening effect, and the aerial was shifted further down the yard. There, however, the ammeter showed only .1 of an amp and although the aerial was longer and he was working on the second harmonic stations in Indo-China, America answered his call quickly and gave him up to R6 in strength. Among the stations which answered his "CQ" were U9ARA, belonging to R. E. Henry, of 302 West Pine-street, Butler, Mo., 8FOK in French Indo-China, and U4SI belonging to J. M. Ewbanks, of Atlanta, Georgia.[61]

1926 09[edit]

TALKING WITH AMERICA. Wireless Amateurs. SUCCESSFUL TESTS. Fifty-three thousand words of official test messages found their way across the Pacific Ocean during the 14 days of the trans-Pacific tests conducted by the Wireless Institute of Australia and the American Radio Relay League. . . . QUALIFYING STATIONS. The following is a list of Australian stations that qualified in test "A," accomplishing both transmission and reception of a 500-word message (in order of merit):— Receiving and Transmitting: Special service, 2YI; general, 2TM, 2IJ, 2CG, 3EF, 3AD; special mention by A.R.R.L., 3HL, 4AN, 7DX. Transmitting only: 2CS. Receiving only: 2BK, 2GW, 2JP, 2DY, 2KW, H. C. St. John, 2JY, 2BB, 2AB, 2LM, C. D. Roberts, 3WM, 3KB, 3YN, A. H. Reid, 5KN (No. 1 Air Sta-tion, Point Cook), 3SR, A. Blngle, M. Ireson, 4DO, 6KX, 7OM, 7AB.[62]

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker After Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . Mr. H. Simmons, our local 6KX, is doing some splendid work with high frequency amplification on the short waves: Using a standard type Reinartz circuit, it is possible to consistently log numerous American amateurs and also 2XAF's phone at good strength. When the stage of high frequency is added, however, some of the first district Yankees come in with a volume that makes headphone reception almost unbearable. Mr. Simmons states the addition of a stage of high frequency is not very difficult, and the results obtained certainly justify the alteration.[63]

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker After Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . Amongst the competitors in the interstate reliability test is 7DX, who won the trans-Pacific tests, and incidentally annexes the gold watch donated as first prize. Naturally, as soon as a contact is gained with 7DX he is asked for the time. The recent tornado which visited the coast of Florida, must have played havoc with a number of well-known American broadcasting stations located there. WIOD and WMBF were built right on Miami beach, and were large stations. WQAM was another station located in the devastated area. 6KX and 6BO are active participants in the interstate reliability tests, and can often be heard receiving a batch of coded messages for local delivery. Both these stations have messages for QSR to 6BN, 6WP, 6MU, 6CJ, 6GL, 6GM, and 6LS, and would be pleased to arrange for a schedule to clear their traffic. The last two relays of WGY by 6WF were not as successful as the first attempt. Atmospheric conditions have not been at all favorable, especially on Wednesday morning, when 2XAF's carrier wave could only be weakly heard, and we were indeed surprised to hear Mr. Coxon resolve portions of it into music. The receiver used must be the last word in sensitivity. An expert committee in Victoria has lately been determining the effects of fading from the various broadcasting stations, 2FC it was noted, faded least of all and the transmissions were remarkably consistent. This same finding could also be applicable to 6WF, who uses a similar wave length. 3LO was found to be very steady during daylight, but was subject to fading during the night hours. When a tree is used for one point of the aerial suspension, it ls liable with a heavy wind, to put a big strain on the aerial wire, which will result in the aerial mast or support being fractured. A good remedy for this is to insert a fairly strong coiled spring in the aerial support, which allows a certain amount of slack under strain. The spring should not have a very strong tension, and yet should be resilient enough to spring back into shape under normal conditions. Tests are now being conducted by the Wireless Institute between interstate stations on 80-90 metres. Coded messages designated for the various participating stations are drawn up by each of the State divisions, and these have to be transmitted to their correct destinations, points being allotted for correct transmission and reception. The message may be relayed through an intermediary station, but a direct contact gains more marks for the competitors. Practically every night dozens of Eastern States amateurs can be heard calling CQ with their traffic. A good deal has already been received destined for local sources by 6KX and 6BO, who are actively engaged in the tests. A number of messages have yet to be transmitted from W.A. to the Eastern States, and we would like to see more local stations participating, as the tests are of unusual value, and a genuine reliability test. The amateur-conducted trans-Pacific tests have now been finalised and a report issued by the Wireless Institute contains some very interesting details. Some fifty-three thousand words were handled by the amateurs, which is a noteworthy achievement. The honor for first place in the Commonwealth was annexed by Mr. T. Watkins, 7DX, of Tasmania, whose signals are well known to local short wave experimenters. Mr. Watkins consistently sent and received messages without errors, and his success was well merited. 7DX used a very low power, his receiver using only two valves. The best performers in each of the other States were: — Victoria, 3EF, Mr. H. W. Maddick; New South Wales, 2TM, Mr. H. Turner; Queensland, 4AN, Leighton Gibson. It is unfortunate that, owing to misunderstanding the West Australian competitors were omitted, but 6KX, Mr. H. Simmons, of Subiaco, during the currency of the test, carried out come very excellent work, and was the leading performer in this State. It has been prominently brought out as a result of the tests, that reliable communication between America and Australia by amateur wireless organisations is consistently possible. Such an alternative means of communication between the two countries should always be a valuable adjunct. Even if it goes no farther than making and cementing friend-ships between the amateurs, it has accomplished a great deal.[64]

1926 10[edit]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . Amongst the Australian stations who qualified in the American tests in receiving a 500 word message, there was only one representative of WA, who was successful, this being 6KX, Mr. H. Simmons. We congratulate him on his creditable performance.[65]

The Broadcast Listener. OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE WIRELESS INSTITUTE (W.A. DIVISION), AND THE AFFILIATED RADIO SOCIETIES. (By "Chris. T.L.") THREE-WAY WORKING SUCCESSFUL AMATEURS. To hold a conversation by wireless telephony with two other experimenters, in much the same way as people have been accustomed to do with one person over the ordinary telephone, has recently been accomplished by three wireless experimenters in Perth. The experiment was so worked that either one or the two listeners to the transmitter could break in on the conversation with a retort or an interjection, and listen to the response from the original transmitter. Over a year ago 6KX (Mr. Harry Simmons, of Nicholson-road, Subiaco), and 6WP (Mr. W. Phipps, of Rupert-street, Subiaco) conceived the idea of experimenting with duplex working of wireless telephony on the short waves. Many difficulties were originally encountered, but these have now been surmounted with comparative simplicity. For duplex working the transmitters of either party are set going; of course, on a different wave length. Then the receiver of each is tuned to the transmitter of the other, and with the receiver alongside the transmitter, it is possible to speak into the microphone of the transmitter, and hear in the 'phones the reply given via the other transmitting set. For triplex working, conditions are much more difficult and the wave length of each transmitter has virtually to overlap. Experiments conducted between 6KX, 6WP and 6BO (Mr. Bert Grey, of Nedlands) are reported to have been eminently satisfactory.[66]

AMATEUR ACTIVITY. A Week of Tests. The reliability tests were sprung upon the local transmitters as a distinct surprise. Although there is always a paucity of information regarding the doings of the executive of the Wireless Institute, there seemed to be quite an unusual lack of news regarding the test and the mode of procedure for the entrants. One would naturally think that the executive body cognisant with our distance from the main scene of activity would arrange for details to be forwarded in advance. But the position now becomes one where information is lacking; what little that is known is gained through conversing with other amateurs. Despite this, however, our local stations have put up a very good showing, and 6KX and 6BO have been doing some consistent work. A good deal of traffic has been handled. The general impression is that a dozen messages were to be transmitted to each participating station, but we can hardly see how this scheme could be worked. If such were the case, thousands of messages would have to be handled, and we are at present not quite clear on the procedure that is being adopted. The number of stations who are participating is a tribute to the Institute in inaugurating the relay, and the spirit in which the stations are co-operating is very fine indeed. Everybody seems anxious for traffic, salutations being of the briefest; the handling of relay messages is at last a reality, and the amateur has wholeheartedly entered into the contest. It is unfortunate that many of our local stations are not participating as more would have stimulated interest whereas at present, two stations are practically handling all the traffic. The Eastern States are keenly active and it is pleasing to hear so many D.C. notes on the air again. The South Australians are especially to be complimented in this direction. Tasmania is the home of the Rectified A.C. amateur, but their stations reach out. Only one Queenslander, 4WB, has been heard. Hosts of Victorians and New South Wales transmitters are easily audible. The best for strength are 5DA and 3KB. Others who are putting out good signals are 5WK, 5WB, 5HG, 3MY, 3JO, 2YJ, 2JD, 7OM, and 7DX.[67]

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker After Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. The Wireless Institute's reliability test is still in full swing, and numerous messages are being handled by local amateurs. 6BO and 6KX are still the star performers, and no complaints are heard from the East that they can't raise a six. The hibernating period is now over for the amateurs, and which is proved by the fact that at least half a dozen local transmitters are consistently at work. 6BO, 6KX, and 6WP have been on triplex phone, with 6BN on now and again. 6GB, 6SR, 6GL, and a stranger in 6DC, are frequently on with code. A reader states that on the evening of October 1, he turned in a station signing 2GB, carrying, out a 24-hour test on 15 kilowatts. He gave his address as Blythe-street, Sydney, and was very well received by our correspondent. We would be pleased to learn from other listeners who have heard 2GB, and have his identity, as he is a newcomer to us. KDKA's special short wave trans-mission, which was broadcasted on 60 metres, was received here at excellent strength by several local amateurs. Mr. H. Simmons, of 6KX, reports that he was able to hear with admirable clarity the whole of Henry Ford's speech. Our local station, 6WF, during last week, also attempted to relay KDKA, but the atmospheric conditions were not at all favorable, and the experiment was not undertaken. 6WF's relay of WGY last Sunday morning was exceptionally good — easily the best we have yet heard. Each selection came through extraordinarily clear, and the volume was amazing. Everything worked like clockwork; there was practically no interference from oscillating receivers, and a marked absence of fading. Announcer Hagen well deserves his reputation as the peer of announcers. He has a particularly pleasing, resonant tone. Amateurs who care to listen in these nights around 90 metres, can be certain, of getting some good phone, principally from local amateurs. During the previous week 6KX, 6BO, 6WP and 6BN were all on phone work. In each case strength and modulation was extremely good. 6KX and 6WP have perfected the art to such a degree that they carry out duplex conversation in a similar manner to the ordinary land line telephone. The evenings are not solely devoted to speech as 6KX can be relied upon for a selection of records, and the others do not lack musical items.[68]

1926 11[edit]

21st Birthday

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . Some good has recently been accomplished by Mr. A. V. Badger (2AB), who has communicated with every Australian State using minute input wattages. Early this month he was in touch with local 6KX, when his input was only 1.6 watts, just about the power that is expended in lighting the globe of a small torch lamp. Mr. Badger was using for his transmitting valve, the well-known Phillips B406, which is principally used as a low-frequency amplifier. Such excellent work with small powers and receiving valves, shows that the beginner in transmitting need not be concerned about the cost of suitable valves to work satisfactorily on short waves. . . . Joy and mirth were unconfined last Saturday evening, when a party was given to celebrate the coming of age of Mr. H. Simmons (6KX), who is well known as one of WA's leading amateurs. The guests were happily en-tertained, and the ritual of handing over the latch-key by 6SR evoked hearty laughter. 6KX's radio shack was the cynosure of all eyes, and his beautifully constructed Reinartz set was a subject of admiration. The dis-play of QSL. cards from practically all portions of the globe testified to the extreme efficiency Mr. Simmons has attained with his transmitter. During a daintily served supper the many guests were entertained with delight-ful reproduction by loud-speakers of the local broadcast.[69]

UTILISING A WAVE TRAP. A Very Simple Method. The first reliability test conducted by the Wireless Institute has been finalised, and the points allotted to the various contestants. The winner proved to be 2DY, who transmitted and received 24 messages and also relayed another 27, and was allotted 780 points. The next best was 2JY, with a total of 45 messages, and 610 points. Owing to the paucity of information regarding the test received by local amateurs, nothing definite was known of the test; but, despite this, 6BO and 6KX actively co-operated, and were instrumental in handling a message total far in advance of many of the Eastern Staters, despite the fact that the latter have greater advantages in relaying messages. It is announced that the second test has commenced, and messages routed for WA have already been received locally, but there is still a distinct lack of information as to what is doing, and the test is half way through before the local amateurs are aware it has commenced. The previous test left much to be desired in the way of expeditious handling of traffic, and reliability doesn't count for much when one has three weeks in which to make sure the message is reliable, and we suggest to the Wireless Institute that they conduct a relay test from East to West or vice versa, with relays between assigned States, but optional stations. The message would have to be sent from the station of origin, and be received by the station to which it is addressed. It could then be retransmitted back. Keen competition would ensue if the various stations were matched against each other. A test of this nature would combine ac-curacy and speed — the two most essential factors in wireless work.[70]

THE AMATEURS. And Their Activity. The past month has been one of strenuous working for the local transmitters, as those who were participants in the reliability test were kept busy in handling traffic. Apart from this, little else of importance in DX working has been done, and so far 6AG has been the only station who has successfully managed to get QSO with England. 6KX has done very well in getting a report from Italy. 6GB is consistently getting across to South Africa at R6, and when he obtains a valve with its due length of filament, he will no doubt have a world-wide range. 6AG has been doing a good deal of experimental work with crystal control, and his telephony is a treat to listen to. The steady control by crystal is of immense advantage on short waves, and we cannot understand why more of the local stations have not given the system a trial. Quite a number of stations are up around 80 metres, though present indications point to 40 metres again becoming the favoured band. There is no doubt that the higher range is much better for interstate working, and for that reason the tests are being carried out on this band. Several new stations have started up, 6DH and 6VP, being amongst them. We have also come across a couple of stations operating under illegal calls. The practice is foolish, and liable to result in a heavy penalty. 6KX is still a star performer, doing great work with the 120 watter. 6WP has a similar valve, but uses a 201A for preference. 6MU has obtained a motor generator outfit, putting out perhaps the strongest local signal we have heard, but not yet pure. DCX, 6AM, who is leaving us shortly, was heard for a few moments with an excellent QSB and R8. 6CJ has started again after a six months' rest, his rectifiers functioning perfectly after the addition of water. 6BO is looking around for new means of plate supply, and is wavering between transformers and generators. 6BN is holidaying at the Caves. Most of the others have been quiet, but the forthcoming test should see at least half a dozen local participants. 6KX had the misfortune to have his aerial halliard carry away, with the consequence that his aerial came promptly earthwards. Despite this he has been able to carry out communication with the East by using an improvised aerial about eight feet high, and totally surrounded and screened by trees and houses. For a conclusive demonstration of the wonderful efficiency of the short waves, this should be indeed ample.[71]

AMATEUR NOTES. Local Activities. . . . 6KX tried a generator in preference to AC, but soon went back to his first love. This station has achieved remarkable success with rectified AC, and generally puts out a note equal to the best DC with a good signal on 85 metres. The QSR is still rough, nevertheless the wave is very steady, and Bert should be reaching out with the plant.[72]

1926 12[edit]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. A good number of commercial stations have now made their appearance round about 40 metres, one of which is, in all probability, the new Australian beam station. Automatic transmission is carried out at varying speeds mostly, too fast to be distinguished, so it is assumed the high speed tests have commenced. Listeners who are anxious to tune in telephony transmissions on the short waves are advised to listen down in region of 90 metres, where quite a number of local amateurs are broadcasting some good concerts, notably 6KX. The transmissions from this station are remarkably pure, and of good strength. We understand that 6WP, 6BN, and 6KX will shortly be transmitting music on 200 metres, all three of these stations have earned laurels for their quality modulation and as soon as the necessary 200 metre conversions are affected, we can look forward to some good concerts, as an alternative to 6WFs programmes.[73]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-in Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . Mr. Harry Simmons, who operates amateur station 6KX, has arranged to conduct a competition amongst listeners who frequent the short waves. This will take the form of various announcements embodying different sounding words, the listeners being requested to write them down. The competitor who is successful in receiving the most of these, and located at the greatest distance, will receive a new dull emitter valve as a prize. The various words will be spoken, and Morse will not be used. The tests will take place from 7 p.m. onwards, and will commence during the week on a wave length of 90 metres.[74]

EXPERIMENTER'S TEST, ON 200 METRES. Mr. Harry Simmons (6KX), one of this State's prominent experimenters, is setting out to reinfuse some activity among the amateurs and experimentalists. Commencing with the new year he proposes to conduct a "word test," and seeks the co-operation of amateurs throughout the State. In brief, the plan is as follows:— Between 7.15 and 8 p.m. on weeknights 6KX will read out slowly a number of words, and listeners are asked to write these down in the sequence as given. Reports upon each day's transmissions are to be given, reporting upon such items as modulation, strength, and any of other features of transmission that may be worthy of comment. 6KX will use between 5 and 10 watts, the wave length being in the vicinity of 200 metres, so that owners of broadcast receiving sets may, by using suitable coils, listen to this telephony. The test will continue over a month, and the listener submitting the greatest number of words heard during the month, together with the best report of the transmission (of which 6KX will be judge) will be presented with a dull emitter valve of the 206 type. It is anticipated that while all experimenters will not be able to listen in nightly, there will be a large section which will aspire to hearing three fourths of the transmissions.[75]

1927[edit]

1927 01[edit]

SUBIACO MAN LISTENS-IN TO THE RENOWN! (Start Photo Caption) In his wireless den at his home in Nicholson-road, Subiaco, Mr. H. K. Simmons who is shown here at his instrument heard the great wireless of the Renown "talking" to the shore stations in New York. Mr. Simmons, who is only 21 years of age, is the first in Australia to pick up the battleship. (End Photo Caption)[76]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-in Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. The short wave equipment which has been placed on board the Renown for purposes of continuity of communication, has already proved itself equal to the task, as when the warship was only one day out from Portsmouth, transmissions on the short waves were loudly and clearly heard by a local amateur, Mr. H. Simmons.[77]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-ln Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . An excellent suggestion has been put forward by Mr. Stevens (6BN) who suggests that transmitting amateurs should seriously consider climbing up to 150 to 200 metres and carry out some experimental telephony work. This band is one of the best for low powered 'phone work and it is not difficult to obtain good modulation, and which is very much of a problem down on 90. Mr. Cecil, of Kalgoorlie, has already been doing some good work and his 'phone has been reported at good strength from Albany. Other local transmitters who will shortly be operating on 200 metres are 6BN, 6WP, and 6KX. Mr. H. Simmons clearly demonstrated the utility of the portable set during the Subiaco club's outing last weekend, when he installed and successfully operated one of his standard Zenith Reinartz receivers. The difficulty of lack of an aerial was overcome by using a piece of copper gauze suspended between the launch's flag poles. This improvised aerial was distinctly inefficient, the total length being about 30ft. long and 12ft. high, but no difficulty was experienced in working a loud-speaker, at good volume 6WF's transmissions, both morning and afternoon, came through nice and clean, and the band concert relayed, from the Zoo was of admirable clarity. Now that Mr. Simmons has amply provided the feasibility of the portable set, it is hoped more use will be made of this form of entertainment. It is just as well to mention that a permit is necessary for such sets, but it does not involve any extra fee, application merely being made to the radio inspector for the necessary permission. Official notification has been received from the responsible authorities that amateurs who are working down on the 40-metre band must forgo this band during certain periods of the day whilst the Renown is on her way to Australia. The defence authorities have already been allocated the wave bands up to 35.5 metres, and the amateurs on 37 are running this pretty close. It must be admitted by the amateur that they have been very kindly dealt with by the Federal authorities in respect to the short waves, and have greater freedom and less restrictions imposed on experiments than amateurs of any other country, and it is only fair that amateurs should set out to heartily reciprocate the Federal Government's concessions. It would not be asking too much for all amateurs to forgo 40 metres for the whole period of the Renown's cruise. It is only a matter of a few months, and in the meantime, they can all flock up to 90 and carry out some very much needed experimental work on that hand.[78]

1927 02[edit]

A FORTHCOMING TEST. The Schedule Arranged. The time schedule for tests to be carried out on the 19th and 20th inst. are as follow:— OA6BH, 6.30-6.45; OA6KH, 6.45-7 p.m.; OA6DH, 7 to 7.15; OA6GM, 7.15 to 7.30; OA6SR, 7.30 to 7.45; OA6RW, 7.45 to 8; OA6DA, 8 to 8.15; OA6AG, 8.15 to 8.30; OA6LS, 8.30 to 8.45; OA6KX, 8.45 to 9. OA6VP, 9 to 9.15; OA6BN, 9.15 to 9.30; OA6WP, 9.30 to 9.45; OA6BO, 9.45 to 10; OA6LT, 10 to 10.15; OA6DE, 10.15 to 10.30; OA6CJ, 10.30 to 10.45; OA6BB, 10.45 to 11; OA6JJ, 11 to 11.15; OA6AB, 11.15 to 11.30; OA6VK, 11.30 to 11.45. All the above stations are on the 90 metre band. The following stations are on the 36 metre band:— OA6MU, 7 to 7.15; OA6SA, 7.15 to 7.30; OA6GB, 11.15 to 11.30 p.m. Reports should be sent to the hon. secretary, Mr. W. R. Phipps, 83 Carnarvon-street, Victoria Park.[79]

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-in Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker After Knowledge. By AERIAL. The first test organised under the auspices of the T. and R. section of the Wireless Institute was a distinct success, which was to be expected, with the detailed arrangements, and the thorough methods exhibited by the organiser in arranging the schedules. One little point, however, will need amending, the time allocated for the individual transmissions was too long. This could, for future tests, more conveniently be of ten minutes' duration only. A great many stations failed to show signs of activity, and it would be wise in the forthcoming tests to eliminate those who showed themselves indifferent. The new intern-tional intermediates were universally in use, and to our mind they are decidedly cumbersome, and not as decisive as their predecessor, the single A, and signifying Australia. Our call signs are now typical of the old South African calls. This similarity led to a very amusing incident, when New Zealand Z1AF was heard calling, "Test South Africa." He apparently heard a number of our locals during the currency of the tests, and obviously misled by the new prefixes, evidently thought the conditions were good or he had a perfect receiver, to be hearing so many South African amateurs in the one evening. One very noticeable feature of the tests was the high standard of Morse prevailing, and also the pureness of the carrier. The following is a report on the stations who were heard:— 6OG, with crystal control, about R7, D.C.; 6BB, who surprised everybody with a good D.C. note at fair strength; 6BN was nice and clear at R6, and policed the ether at intervals; 6GM, pure D.C., and an excellent transmission; 6KX, R7, good D.C. with key clicks, perfect sending; 6LT, logged by other listeners about R4; 6SR, used his receiver and got out with a double wave; 6VP, best Morse of the lot, but only R4, fair note; 6WP, well up above 100, but consistent and clear; 6DE, about R6, with a good note.[80]

1927 03[edit]

WIRELESS NEWS AND NOTES. (By "Electron.") . . . LOCAL TRANSMITTER TESTING. From 8 until 10.10 o'clock this evening, also tomorrow evening, an amateur transmitting test will be conducted under the auspices of the T. and R. section of the Wireless Institute. For the benefit of listeners-in generally, it may be mentioned that the test will consist of a reading of 20 words from a wireless book by each of the transmitters. Points will be awarded to each person sending in a log of receptions, and will be given on the mileage system. Each transmitter will be allowed 10 minutes at the microphone, and they will transmit in the following order:— Stations 6AG, 6BO, 6DH, 6WP, 6BN, 6LS, 6GM, 6DW, 6SR, 6VP, 6LS, 6VK, 6BB, and 6KX, at 10.10 p.m. The transmitters will deliver a different reading each night, whilst 6AG will announce the time on each occasion prior to the test. As the simplest acknowledgement represents a great deal of encouragement to our local amateur transmitters, those persons listening in are specially asked to forward their reports as early as possible.[81]

WIRELESS WEEK by WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker After Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . During the week some further tests have been carried out by the transmitters and relay section of the Wireless Institute, when telephony tests were indulged in by the transmitters participating. A further test will be carried out this evening, and the following schedule has been allotted:— 6AG, 8 p.m.; 6BO, 8.10 p.m.; 6DH, 8.20 p.m.; 6WP, 8.30 p.m.; 6BN, 8.40 p.m.; 6LS, 8.50 p.m.; 6GM, 9 p.m.; 6DW, 9.10 p.m.; 6SR, 9.20 p.m.; 6VP, 9.30 p.m.; 6LT, 9.40.p.m.; 6VK, 9.50 p.m.; 6BB, 10 p.m.; 6KX, 10.10 p.m. No Morse transmission will take place during this test. The station call sign and a paragraph of twenty words will be broadcasted on phone. Points will be awarded to listeners sending in a log, on the points per mile system, and a prize will be awarded to the winner.[82]

1927 04[edit]
1927 05[edit]
1927 06[edit]
1927 07[edit]

The Broadcast Listener. OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE WIRELESS INSTITUTE (W.A. DIVISION), AND THE AFFILIATED RADIO SOCIETIES. (By "Chris, T.L."). WIRELESS INSTITUTE ANNUAL MEETING. The annual meeting of the Western Australian division of the Wireless Institute of Australia, Incorporated, was held at the conference hall, Westralian Farmers, Ltd., on Thursday night, Mr. B. M. Holt in the chair. In delivering his presidential report, Mr. Holt said he wished more members would come forward and give lectures or lecturettes. The four public lectures had been a great success, and he was certain that, if continued, they would materially increase the membership. The total number of members is 46 — 26 members and 20 associate members. There have been seven new members and eight new associate members during the year, and three resignations. The T. and R. section was formed in January last. This has made good progress, and a number of tests have been carried out. This section has now on hand the building of a portable transmitter, and on completion it is hoped that many field experiments will be carried out. "Unfortunately Mr. Phipps cannot see his way clear to carry on as secretary to this section, and his place has been taken by our old friend Mr. Parks, pro tem. At the last meeting members spoke very highly of the good work done by Mr. Phipps. You will all agree that we will miss him very much. "Mr. Stevens and myself appeared before the Commission when they visited this State, and presented the case which was prepared by Messrs. Stevens, Goldsmith, Congdon and Green, on behalf of the Wireless Institute and clubs. We are all, no doubt, looking forward to the result of this Wireless Commission. "In my last annual report I mentioned that the institute was just on the verge of becoming a incorporated body. This has now been completed, all arrangements being finalised on January 19 of this year." Mr. Holt closed his report with thanks to Mr. John Thomson, manager of Westralian Farmers, Ltd., for the use of the conference hall, and to Mr. Stevens, the hon. secretary. The presided handed to 6KX (Mr. Harry Simmons) a trans-Pacific test certificate for having received a test message of 500 words in June, 1926. This was signed by the officials of both the W.I.A. and the A.R.R.L. The treasurer reported on the financial position, which disclosed that there was a credit balance of £24. Election of Officers. The election of officers for the ensuing year resulted as follows:— President, Mr. B. M. Holt; vice-presidents, Messrs. F. H. Goldsmith and B. Congdon; treasurer, Mr. F. Narroway; council, Messrs. F. H. Goldsmith, Moss, B. Congdon, J. C. Park, H. Simmons, A. E. Stevens. L. Symons, and M. Urquhart. Mr. J. Thomson was again elected hon. president and Mr. C. P. Knapton hon. vice-president. The secretary notified that lectures to members would recommence being held on the second Thursday in each month. The series to begin next week will be of particular interest to those contemplating sitting for the amateur operators' proficiency certificate. Subsequent to the general meeting a council meeting was held to fill the vacancy caused by the retirement of Mr. Harry Simmons, who, after the ballot papers had been posted to members, decided to go East at an early date. Mr. W. Turner was unanimously selected to fill the vacancy. The next meeting of the Wireless Association will be on Thursday, July 14.[83]

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker After Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. The Subiaco Radio Society will tender, on August 2, a valedictory social to Mr. H. Simmons (6KX), who is leaving Western Australia for the Eastern States. Mr. H. Simmons has been one of the most prominent and successful of the local amateurs, and he has done much to foster the amateur movement. At all times he has been energetic in co-operating with other amateurs in the development of transmitting technique, and his prowess with his own station has become a byeword with Australian and American amateurs. Invitations are extended to all friends by the Subiaco Club to bid farewell to Mr. Simmons at the above-mentioned function, which will be in the form of a social evening.[84]

SUBIACO RADIO CLUB. Mr. Harry Simmons (6KX), late president of the club, is to be tendered a farewell on August 2, when a social and dance is to be held in the Shenton Park Theatre. A good evening is promised. The club will meet on alternate Mondays from July 25.[85]

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker After Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERlAL. . . . A social and dance will be held under the auspices of the Subiaco Radio Society at the Shenton Park Picture Theatre Hall, Nicholson-road, Subiaco, on Tuesday evening, at 8 o'clock. During the evening the opportunity will be taken to bid farewell to Mr. H. Simmons (6KX), who is leaving for the Eastern States at an early date. A cordial invitation is extended to all members and friends.[86]

1927 08[edit]

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker After Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. A pleasant evening was spent by friends of Mr. H. Simmons on Tuesday evening last, when members of the Subiaco Radio Society arranged a social evening to bid farewell to their guest, who is leaving for the Eastern States at an early date. Many eulogistic references were made to Mr. Simmons' ability and co-operative work as an amateur. His short wave work has always reflected great credit on himself and also the West Australian amateur movement. During the evening Mr. Simmons was presented with a handsome engraved gold watch, the gift of members of the Subiaco Radio Society.[87]

FAREWELL 6KX. About 20 members of the Wireless Institute gathered at the Cabin dining room on Thursday night last to bid farewell to Mr. Harry Simmons (OA6KX), who is shortly leaving Western Australia for the Eastern States. Through the courtesy of Mr. Evans a quiet corner was provided the party. After an appetising repast, the president of the W.I.A. (Mr. B. M. Holt) spoke in appreciation of the work Mr. Simmonds had done for amateur wireless in the State, and also for many broadcast listeners. Mr. W. E. Coxon, Mr. Bert Congdon, and Mr. A. E. Stevens expressed their regrets on behalf of amateurs at Mr. Simmonds' early departure, and said that the one bright spot of the whole affair was that 6KX would probably listen for "amateur sixes." He would also make a good Federal delegate when the conference came round. Mr. Holt, on behalf of the local division of the Wireless Institute, presented Mr. Simmonds with a massive dining room clock, suitably inscribed. Mr. Simmonds briefly returned thanks and expressed his desire to keep contact over the air with his friends in Western Australia once he settled down in Victoria. In making the presentation, the president jokingly said it was a Reinartz set — a type which the guest is generally regarded as being an adept at making and handling — and the smile which broke over the guest's face when he found the nature of the gift caused much amusement.[88]

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker After Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. Mr. H. Simmons, erstwhile 6KX, has received the following interesting letter from the B.B.C.:— "With regard to our policy of erecting a short-wave station for the transmission of regular programmes to the colonies, no doubt you will be interested to learn that we are proceeding with the erection of a station of this type. It is not possible at present, however, to give any date for the commencement of these trans-missions. In the past it has been our policy not to spend time and money on a station of this type until we can be reasonably sure that the service from it would be satisfactory, and even now we cannot guarantee that it would be satisfactory from the point of view of giving a really reliable service to the Dominions. Furthermore, the colonies and Dominions are so widely, separated geographically that the transmissions from a short-wave station would have to be practically continuous throughout the 24 hours if an Empire service in its fullest sense is to be provided."[89]

1927 09[edit]

WIRELESS PICKINGS. Mr. Harry Simmons, who was well known in this State as operator of amateur station 6KX, is now established in Victoria. His new QRA is 3XK (a reversal of the old letters), No. 7 Wordsworth-street, Moonee Ponds, Victoria. Writing recently, he said that he had had the misfortune to drive a nail into his transformer, with the result that he will not be on the air for a while. A couple of days after his arrival, however, he had a receiving aerial in place.[90]

1927 10[edit]
1927 11[edit]
1927 12[edit]

1928[edit]

1928 01[edit]
1928 02[edit]
1928 03[edit]
1928 04[edit]
1928 05[edit]
1928 06[edit]
1928 07[edit]
1928 08[edit]
1928 09[edit]
1928 10[edit]

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics — Of the Greatest Value to the Seeker after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. . . . WITH THE AMATEURS. 6KX, who recently returned from the East to enjoy our sunshine, brought his baby transmitter with him, which with twin 201A's, has worked scores of Yankees and promises some new watt per mile records. . . . A.R.T.L. FIELD DAY. During today (Sunday) a second field day will be held under the auspices of the local branch of the Australlan Radio Transmitting League, and given the choice of fine weather an enjoyable and instructive day is promised. The outing will take the form of a field day with portable apparatus, combined with a picnic. The party will be divided in two portions. Mr. W. E. Coxon (6AG), with his crystal controlled transmitter, will be stationed in the vicinity of Applecross or Canning Bridge, whilst the main party will make Greenmount or Swan View their rendezvous. With this latter party there will be three portable transmitters, comprising 6BO, 6SA, and 6KX, the latter with his record-breaking midget transmitter. Also associated with this party will be another three or four short wave receivers, and represented by 6SR, 6MU, 6NO and 6JW, whilst the concourse will be added to by other prominent members of the league. It is the intention of both parties to work on 90 metres, and various tests will be made to see how many Eastern States stations can be worked with the portables, and tests will also be carried out with 6AG. A cordial invitation is extended to those who are interested in this phase of wireless to attend the demonstrations, especially country experimenters who may be down for show week. The main party will assemble in front of the G.P.O. at 9.45 a.m., and those with cars at their disposal will be heartily welcomed.[91]

WIRELESS WEEK BY WEEK. Our Budget of Broadcasting and Listening-In Lyrics, of Great Value to Seekers after Knowledge. RADIOGRAMS. By AERlAL. . . . AN INSTRUCTIVE FIELD DAY. Favored with a glorious sunshiny day, the second field day of the local section of the A.R.T.L. held last Sunday proved a most successful outing both from the practical and social viewpoints. The main party which comprised most of the active local transmitters, made for Greenmount as their rendezvous, it being the intention to establish portable stations in the vicinity of the highest points on the hills and gain contact with reciprocal stations in the city. Some little debate ensued as to the most favorable locations with the consequence the party was more or less split up, which however proved beneficial to all concerned, as less interference from the adjacent transmitters was experienced. A brief respite was indulged in whilst various adepts at the art of aerial throwing endeavored more or less successfully to entice the aerial wires over neighbouring tree branches. With this preliminary done, no time was lost in getting the various sets in working order. The transmitters were 6SA, 6BO and 6KX who also had their associated receiving sets. Perhaps the most remarkable outfit was that of 6SA, a receiver which would not attract by its looks, but it worked with the customary efficiency that 6SA mysteriously manages to extract from a few turns of wire and a condenser or two. More remarkable still was the transmitter, its outward appearance betrayed no hint of its inward composition, much less its efficiency. Previous notions and experience of high tension supply led 6SA to design a vibrator unit which provided current through a small step up transformer and on to a pair of D5B's. With this arrangement and using a watt or so power, 6SA successfully worked many stations and em-braced 6HE at Geraldton and 6DA at Albany. Further evidence of the magic properties of 6SA in building and operating transmitters were given when phone was received at Geraldton with nothing more than a single B battery for high tension. 6BO had the most imposing display of the day, and in contradiction the least imposing results, mainly due to the insatiable greed of the dynamotor in running flat the accumulator supply, nevertheless the receiver worked OK, and a dry cell battery bank is contemplated for future field outings. 6KX, with a baby transmitter on the TPTG style and working from Burgess batteries put out a DC note that would rival a crystal controlled outfit. This station was located in the shadow of a hill, but found no difficulty in working the gang and incidentally put out broadcast entertainment with the aid of a portable gramophone. Numerous visitors were in evidence and an instructive time was spent in visiting each station in turn. The main idea of these field days is to demonstrate the efficiency and adaptability of portable apparatus, and to what extent communication can be carried on with low powered gear. The social aspect is also not lost sight of and an al fresco luncheon gave a picnic air to the proceedings. It is hoped that similar functions will in future take place more frequently, but we would like to see those two energetic experimenters 6BC and 6SA get into collusion regarding transportation and location details for subsequent events, as experience of breaking bye laws to catch up with the party, and finding ourselves first on the scene almost made us doubters of our Westclox.[92]

1928 11[edit]

RADIOGRAMS. By AERIAL. SUCCESSFUL FIELD DAY. Kindly favored by fortune, with a beautiful day, the third field day, held under the auspices of the local branch of the A.R.T.L. proved a pronounced success from both the practical and social view points. Unlike preceding events of this nature. Last Sunday's demonstration was confined to transmission and reception on 32 metres, which wavelength has proved of immense advantage in communicating over long distances, with small-powered gear, and any fears which may have existed regarding the absorption of this wave length by adjacent tree foliage, were apparently unwarranted, as little difficulty was encountered in working adjacent stations, even though the transmitters were located in the heart of the bush. Again the most outstanding feature of the day's operations was the remarkable efficiency evidenced by 6SA's portable transmitter. This set was the same that had been used on previous occasions, but the change of wave length clearly demonstrated its powers and capabilities, on the shorter waves. 6SA earlier in the afternoon succeeded in raising a fellow amateur in South Australia, but the masterpiece was to follow, when later in the evening, this station successfully put over phone conversation to the Eastern States, which must have bewildered them somewhat to learn that 6SA was using a portable set and located in the depth of the bush on the Darling Ranges. One of the most outstanding features is the ease with which short waves are received and the total absence of power leaks and high-tension noise, proves conclusively that the city area has a material effect on the attenuation of short-wave signals. 6AG had a somewhat more imposing display with his crystal control portable and transmission, from which have often been heard by listeners to 6WP. A well-thought-out aerial system was erected conforming to all the latest practices of feeder systems, and as can be imagined, this set also proved its efficiency, phone being reported at excellent strength by city and country listeners. 6BO had discarded his generator, the substitute, being 120 volts Burgess' High Tension, and applied to a split Hartley circuit. This station provided most of the day's musical entertainment by discriminating broadcasts from the ubiquitous gramaphone. Subiaco Radio Society were represented with 6KX's transmitter, and a reciprocal short wave set, whilst the Victoria Park club had a mystery set which nevertheless showed it lacked none of the essentials for putting out a strong signal. Other transmitters were represented by 6KM and 6NO but who were situated a little distance from the main scene of activity. A pleasing feature of these demonstrations is the amount of interest being taken by the laymen, and on each occasion an increasing number of visitors is evident. The practical experience gained from these ventures is of immense advantage and goes to show that anyone equipped with similar portable gear could be located in practically any spot in Australia and yet get in touch with one on another of the various States' amateurs. Also the apparatus, which necessarily is of small dimensions, is easily transportable and takes but little room in a car, in fact, it seems such an accessory will in the near future, become an indispensable item with overlanding motorists.[93]

1928 12[edit]

1929[edit]

1929 01[edit]
1929 02[edit]
1929 03[edit]
1929 04[edit]
1929 05[edit]
1929 06[edit]
1929 07[edit]
1929 08[edit]
1929 09[edit]
1929 10[edit]
1929 11[edit]
1929 12[edit]

THE BROADCASTER. Radio Wrinkles. "B" CLASS STATION. Radio circles were pleased when information was given in this paper at the beginning of last week that a "B" class station was to be erected in Perth at an early date. For some time it has been urged that an alternative programme to that put on the air by 6WF would make a great difference with listeners, and so it should. Those who don't like jazz or classical music may be enabled to listen in to some other entertainment when a second station is on the air. I had the pleasure of an interesting talk with Mr. Musgrove and Mr. Kingston a few days ago concerning the station which Musgroves Ltd. are to erect. Both representatives of the firm are anxious to make the station a good one, and one which would have wide public appeal. It is expected that tenders and full details will be received immediately after the resumption of business in the New Year, and with an early decision after the various schemes have been investigated, it is hoped to have the station on the air towards the end of March, and certainly before the Easter holidays in April. Those who propose going into the country, to Rottnest or any of the various holiday resorts therefore should not forget to provide for a wireless set. No callsign has yet been applied for but it has been suggested, and both Mr. Musgrove and Mr. Kingston approve, that 6ML would be most fitting. It does not conflict with any amateur callsign here, represents the initial letters of the firm and the two consonants are sufficiently clear to avoid misunderstanding over the air. The engineer in charge is to be Mr. Harry Simmonds, who was better known to the amateur world a few years ago as 6KX. A competent young radio engineer he should prove a success in his present position. No decision has yet been made regarding an announcer, but as there is much preliminary work to be done before the station goes on the air this appointment may not be made for some time. A "B" class station as is well known does not derive its revenue from licences, but has to secure revenue from advertising over the air and other avenues. Therefore, some organisation in this direction will be necessary before the less important details are given attention. No announcement has yet been made respecting wavelength, but the chances are it will be in the region of 300 metres. Most of the custom built sets have a range of from 250 to 600 metres and naturally it will be desired to keep the station safely inside this range. A wavelength of some where about 300 metres would avoid, too, the nearest harmonic from 6WF. It is pleasing to learn that even at this early stage there is a spirit of co-operation between the existing station and the new "B" class organisation. By co-ordination between the two stations much may be done to give the programmes which will not clash and which will provide good alternative items. The new station has not definitely fixed on the hours which it will be on the air, but the tentative programme will be: 11 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.; 2.30 to 3.30 p.m.; 5 to 6.30 p.m.; 7.30 to 10.30 p.m., and Sundays from 7 to 9 p.m. With an unlimited choice of gramophone records and pianola rolls and with many talented musicians on their staff, Musgroves should be in an ideal position so far as musical programmes are concerned, but will need to organise some of the other features of the programme, which, however, should not be difficult. The new station will have the goodwill of the whole of the wireless community, which since the alteration of wavelength of 6WF has been finding difficulty in bringing in some of the Eastern States stations.[94]

1930s[edit]

1930[edit]

1930 01[edit]

BROADCASTING STATION. Tenders for 6ML. SUCCESS OF ADELAIDE FIRM. The National Musical Federation Ltd., of Adelaide, the owners of Broadcasting Station 5KA of that city, are the successful tenderers for the construction of a "B" class station for Musgrove's Ltd. of Perth. In making the announcement this morning, Mr. M. Musgrove said that the tender provided for the new station to be handed over on or before March 19, and from advices which he had received the tenderers were making every effort to be ready before that date. The station, which will be known as 6ML, will operate on a wave length of 297 metres, with an output in the aerial of 300 watts. The transmitter will comprise a crystal oscillator, an intermediate amplifier, a power amplifier, a modulating unit, together with filament supply and high tension supply, with smoothing devices. The aerial masts, which will be of steel, are being erected by Musgrove's themselves, and will rise 60ft. above the roof of their building in Murray-street. This work will be put in hand almost immediately, and it is expected that by the middle of February the transmitting units will be shipped from Adelaide. STATION PERSONNEL. The engineer-operator of the station will be Mr. Harry Simmonds, well known among amateur radio operators here, and the announcer will be Mr. Archie Graham, who is at present associated with 6WF. Mr. Graham has appeared as an entertainer at 4QG (Brisbane), 2BL (Sydney), 3LO (Melbourne), and 5CL (Adelaide), in addition to the Perth station, and was for a time announcer for 5CL. The hours the new station will be on the air have been tentatively fixed, and are: Week-days, 11 a.m. to 12.30 p.m., 2.30 to 3.30 p.m., 5 to 6.30 p.m., 7.30 to 10.30 p.m.; Sundays. 7 to 9 p.m. Mr. Musgrove said today that the initial programmes would be drawn up after consultation by him with the programme director, but they were determined to secure the best artists offering. A system of sponsored programmes would be introduced on a similar plan to that adopted in America, where firms bought so much of a station's time on the air and submitted entertainment interspersed with advertising.[95]

NEW WIRELESS STATION. 6ML to Open in March. A new wireless broadcasting station, 6ML, to be operated by Musgroves, Ltd., of Murray street, Perth, will be opened before March 19. Mr. M. Musgrove announced yesterday that his company had accepted the tender of the National Musical Federation, Ltd., of Adelaide, the owners of station 5KA, for the construction of the company's "B" class station, which would be situated in Lyric House, Murray-street. The tender provided for the completion of the station by March 19, but it is understood that the successful tenderers intended to endeavour to have the station ready before that date. The new station will operate on a wave length of 297 metres and will be able to be received by all sets which cover the normal broadcasting band. The power will be only 300 watts, but as the transmitter will be of the latest type, the range of the station will probably extend beyond Albany, Kalgoorlie and Geraldton, which it is intended to serve. The aerial system will be on the roof of Musgrove's buildings and the masts will be 60 feet high. Arrangements for the construction and erection of these parts are now being made. Mr. C. F. Kingston, one of the directors of the company, will be in charge of the station and Mr. A. Graham will be the announcer. Mr. Graham is well known to local listeners, being the "Archie" of "Archie and Watty", radio entertainers. Mr. H. Simmonds, a local amateur radio operator, will be the engineer-operator of the station. The hours that the station will be on the air have been provisionally fixed as follow:— Weekdays, 11 a.m. to 12.30 p.m., 2.30 to. 3.30 p.m., 5 to 6.30 p.m. and 7.30 to 10.30 p.m.; Sun-days, 7 to 9 p.m. The station will thus fill in the gaps between 6WF's day sessions and provide the long-awaited choice of programmes at night, when the majority of radio enthusiasts are listening. Mr. Musgrove said yesterday that the company would not spare, expense in placing programmes of the highest standard before the public. As in the Eastern States and other parts of the world, a system of sponsored sessions would be introduced under which advertisers would buy so much of a station's time on the air and supply entertainment interspersed with advertisements. While the latest music would be broadcast by means of gramophones and player-pianos, the company intended to include in its programmes the best artists available as well as concert parties and a special orchestra.[96]

1930 02[edit]

OVER THE ETHER. Wireless News, Tips and Comments. BROADCAST BREVITIES. BY KILOCYCLE. (Photo Caption) MR. H. T. SIMMONS. The well-known Perth experimenter, who has been appointed chief engineer to Messrs. Musgrove's new broadcasting station, 6ML.[97]

1930 03[edit]

Over the Ether. WIRELESS NEWS, TIPS AND COMMENTS. BROADCAST BREVITIES. BY KILOCYCLE. EARLY OPENING OF 6ML. Perth's New "B" Station. So rapid has progress been made with the installation of the plant for Messrs. Musgroves "B" class station, located at their musical warehouse, Murray-street, that it is anticipated it will be in operation earlier than originally proposed. The installation engineer (Mr. E. Ashwin) in conversation with a representative of this paper, pointed out that 6ML embodies the latest advances made in broadcast station design, incorporating crystal control, separator stage, and linear (Photo Caption) 500 watt linear amplifiers at 6ML. amplification on the amplifier stage. These technical terms imply that everything possible is done, in the interests of perfect transmission,and in a view of the plant confirms the opinion that Western Australia has, through the enterprise of Musgroves, acquired a fine broadcast station. The wavelength to be used is 297 meters, and initial tests have shown there will not be the slightest trace of interference from 6WF in the metropolitan area. As regards the range of the new station this can only be confirmed under operating conditions, but as a conservative estimate, a radius of 300 miles should be spanned. Another point in favor of good medium distance reception is the choice of the wavelength, a similar wave used in the Eastern States, showing a remarkable tendency for long distance work. A technical description of the plant will no doubt prove of interest. The actual operating room, comfortably houses three panels comprising the rectifiers, oscillator and modulator, and the amplifier. Each valve is supplied with a separate high-tension tapping, (Photo Caption) Crystal central oscillator, intermediate amplifier and modulated amplifier. rectified A.C. being used for the oscillator and modulator, and a D.C. generator for the amplifier. Each circuit is neutralised and screening of the oscillator stage and controls is a further refinement. The initial wavelength of 297 metres is generated and controlled by a quartz crystal, which definitely maintains this wavelength. The output from the oscillator is of the order of only 3 watts, which is passed on to the separator stage with a subsequent output of 7 watts. The modulators then come into play, and the output is increased to 60 watts. The wavelength is now a modulated wave in conformity with the impressed voice variations spoken into the microphone, and to obtain further power the modulated output is now amplified by the 500-watt amplifier, consisting of two 250 valves in parallel. From this point the circuit is coupled to the aerial, and the wave is radiated. It is a matter of some difficulty to imagine that this small piece of quartz crystal is directly controlling the whole output, and during its operation it is in a state of mechanical vibration at a rate of little over a million periods a second, though the movement cannot be seen so imperceptibly small is it. The studio control conforms to latest practices, and special attention has been given to all acoustic effects of the studio to eliminate echo and reverbration. The programme sessions have been arranged, so that they will dovetail with the existing sessions from 6WF, and listeners will have a transmission all day, and the choice of either programme during the evening. The hours are 11 a.m. to noon, 12.30 p.m. to 2 p.m., 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., 5.45 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. and 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday evening session 7 to 9. In order that some idea of the effective day and night range of the station may be gauged, listeners are requested to forward reports to Messrs. Musgroves, Murray-street, Perth. For convenience in tuning, those listeners who receive 3DB, 255 metres will find 6ML a little above this tuning point. 2KY, Sydney on 280 metres is also a guide point, though possibly only country listeners receive this latter station. 6ML TESTS. Using an improvised aerial, sus-pended within the building, and an arrangement as inefficient as one could wish for, the 60-watt oscillator of 6ML has been proving its efficiency in some initial tests conducted by the engineering staff, by having its transmissions heard at speaker strength as far as Fremantle, and local reports state excellent reproduction has been obtained. With the 500-watt amplifier and the proper outdoor aerial, in operation the tests presage excellent transmission from our new station. The opening night scheduled for Wednesday, 19th inst., is to be a gala performance, and a first-class programme under the directorship of Ronald Brearley has been arranged.[98]

6ML ON THE AIR. Official Opening Tonight. Perth's new wireless station 6ML, which is owned and will be operated by Musgrove's Ltd., will be on the air for the first time officially tonight, when the opening ceremony will be performed. A "B" class station, 6ML will operate on a wave length of 297 metres. For the first time in history two broadcasting stations will be operating locally. Mr. F. C Kingston, a manager, at the company, will act as manager of 6ML; Mr. R. Brearley will arrange programmes; Mr. H. Simmons is engineer, and Mr. A. Graham is announcer. Mr. Kingston will be in charge of ceremonies for the first half-hour tonight, and will call upon listeners to tune in. So that they may do so to the best advantage, a record will be played. Mr. D. O. (sic) Musgrove will announce the company's policy, and will introduce Dr. J. S. Battye, who will declare the station officially open. Mr. Kingston will address listeners on matters of interest associated with the new station, and will introduce the staff. The whole of these proceedings will not occupy more than half an hour, and at 8.30 a commencement will be made with a varied musical programme lasting two hours, and introducing talented artists yet to be heard on the air.[99]

Wireless News. NEW BROADCAST STATION. 6ML Begins Services To-Night. Tonight, for the first time, wireless enthusiasts in Western Australia will be able to listen to either of two local stations. This welcome chance is brought about by the opening this evening of 6ML, a "B" class station owned and operated by Musgrove's, Ltd., on a wave length of 297 metres. For six years wireless progress here has been retarded by the fact that there was only one local station, and a big increase in licences is expected to follow the opening of the new station. Mr. C. F. Kingston, a director of the company, will act as manager; Mr. R. Brearley is the programme arranger; Mr. H. Simmons, the engineer; and Mr. A. Graham, announcer. There will be a brief ceremony tonight at 8 o'clock, when Mr. D'O. Musgrove will introduce Dr. J. S. Battye, who will formally open the station. Then there will be an uninterrupted programme of two hours, to which many artists, new to radio but well-known on the concert platform, will contribute. The programme, for tonight will be:— 8. p.m.: Official opening ceremony. 8.30: Waltz, Musgrove's Piano Trio. 8.34: "Summer Night," Rita Hawse (mezzo-soprano), 'cello obbligato by Ronald Brearley. 8.38: Russian Folk Songs, Horace Dean (violin). 8.42: Prologue from the opera "Pagliacci," Frank L. Robert-son (baritone). 8.45: Largo, Ronald Brear-ley ('cello). 8.48: Elegia from Trio in D Minor, Musgrove's Piano Trio. 8.51: "Love's Old Sweet Song," Rita Hawse, 'cello obbligato by Ronald Brearley. 8.54: Air from Concerto, Horace Dean. 8.57: "Uncle Rome" and "When Childher Plays," Frank L. Robertson. 9.0: "Lullaby," Ronald Brearley. 9.4: "Song Without Words," Musgrove's Piano Trio. 9.8: "I'm a' Longin' fo' You," Rita Hawse, 'cello obbligato by Ronald Brearley. 9.11: "Capriccio", G. A. McDonald (flute). 9.14: What's Not on the Air Tomorrow, Archie of Musgrove's. 9.19: "Aubade," Horace Dean. 9.22: "Can't Yo' Heah Me Calling Caroline?" Musgrove's Piano Trio. 9.25: Offertoire Op. 12, G. A. Donald. 9.28: "Smilin' Through," Rita Hawse, 'cello obbligato by Ronald Brearley. 9.31: "Brahm's Waltz," Horace Dean. 9.34: "Estrellita," Con-tessa Filippini. 9.38: "On Wings of Song," Ronald Brearley. 9.41: "My Wild Irish Rose," Musgrove's Piano Trio. 9.45: "Il Colloquio Ma-zurka," G. A. McDonald. 9.48: "The Island Spell," Miss Gladys Cunliffe (piano). 9.51: "Leibesleid," Ronald Brearley. 9.54: What's Not on the Air Tomorrow, Archie of Musgrove's. 9.59: "The Little Damosel," Contessa Filippini. 10.1: Aria, G. A. McDonald. 10.5: "Simon the Cellarer," Frank L. Robertson. 10.9: Nocturne, Musgrove's Piano Trio. 10.30: "The Kerry Dance," Contessa Filippini. 10.17: Marche, Gladys Cun-liffe. 10.20: "Just a Cottage Small," Contessa Filippini. 10.24: Finale from Trio Op. 29, Mus-grove's Piano Trio. 10.27: "King Charles," Frank L. Robertson. The regular broadcasting hours of 6ML will be between 11 a.m. and noon, 12.45 p.m. and 2 p.m., 3 p.m. and 4 p.m., 5.45 p.m. and 7.30 p.m., and 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. on week days and 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. on Sundays. On alternative Sunday afternoons from 3 p.m: to 4 p.m. a short address and choral singing will be broadcast by the International Bible Students' Association.[100]

NEW BROADCAST STATION. 6ML Service Opened. Last night, for the first time, wireless enthusiasts in Western Australia were able to listen to either of two local stations. This welcome change is brought about by the opening last evening of 6ML, a "B" class station owned and operated by Musgrove's, Ltd., on a wave length of 297 metres. For six years wireless progress here has been retarded by the fact that there was only one local station, and a big increase in licences is expected to follow the opening of the new station. Mr. C. F. Kingston, a director of the company, will act as manager; Mr. R. Brearley is the programme arranger; Mr. H. Simmons, the engineer; and Mr. A. Graham, announcer. There was a brief ceremony last night at 8 o'clock, when Mr. D'O. Musgrove introduced Dr. J. S. Battye, who formally opened the station. The regular broadcasting hours of 6ML will be between 11 a.m. and noon, 12.45 p.m. and 2 p.m., 3 p.m. and 4 p.m., 5.45 p.m. and 7.30 p.m., and 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. on week days and 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. on Sundays. On alternate Sunday afternoons from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. a short address and choral singing will be broadcast by the International Bible Students' Association.[101]

1930 04[edit]
1930 05[edit]

WIRELESS BROADCASTING. . . . 6ML TONIGHT. 8. "Around the World by Radio," a novelty night from 6ML, arranged by 6KK (sic, 6KX); we leave Western Australia, proceeding across the Indian Ocean listening to station 6ML; 10. close down.[102]

1930 06[edit]
1930 07[edit]
1930 08[edit]
1930 09[edit]
1930 10[edit]
1930 11[edit]
1930 12[edit]

1931[edit]

1931 01[edit]
1931 02[edit]
1931 03[edit]

BROADCAST PROGRAMMES. . . . 6ML. To-day.— Women's radio service (11 a.m. to noon); shopping guide and reproduced music. 12.30 p.m. to 2 p.m.; Reproduced music, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.; Reproduced music, 5.45 p.m. to 6.15 p.m.; Children's session. 6.15 p.m. to 7.30 p.m.; Reproduced music, 7.30 p.m. to 7.50 p.m.; Sporting news by S. B. Gravenall, 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Classical evening, featuring "The Rose Cavalier," "In a Persian Garden" (Dora Lebbette, Muriel Brunskill, Hubert Eisdell and Harold Williams). 9 p.m.; Radio talk by Mr. H. Simmons (station engineer), "Hungarian Rhapsody" No. 12 in C Sharp Minor (Parts 1 and 2). pianoforte solo, by Irene Scharrer, "Passagaglia," Albert Sammons (violin) and Lionel Tertis, viola. Quartet in G. Minor Op. 10, No. 1 (The Lener String Quartet). Tomorrow Evening.— Concert programme.[103]

1931 04[edit]
1931 05[edit]

BROADCAST PROGRAMMES. 6ML To-day.— 11 a.m. to noon: Slopping guide and reproduced music. 12.30 p.m. to 2 p.m.: Reproduced music. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.: Reproduced music. 5.45 p.m. to 6.15 p.m.: Children's session. 6.15 p.m. to 7.30 p.m.: Reproduced music. 7.30 p.m. to 7.35 p.m.: The Two Black Joes (Amos and Willie) in humorous topicalities. 7.35 p.m. to 7.55 p.m.: Jack Barrett in Sporting Anticipations and S. B. Gravenall in a Talk on Tomorrow's Sporting Fixtures. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.: Operatic selections and airs: "I Pagliacci" (prologue) (Lawrence Tibbett). "Les Cloches de Corneville" (the Band of H.M. Coldstream Guards) "There is a Flower that Bloometh" (John McCormack). "Yes! Let Me Like a Soldier Fall (Tudor Davies). "Aldershot Command Searchlight Tattoo" (massed bands of the Aldershot Command). "The Toreador Song" (Harold Williams and the B.B.C. Choirs with orchestra). "Jocelyn Berceuse" (Pablo Casala). "Rigoletto" (introduction and minuet and quartet), (Creatore and his band). "Soldiers' Chorus" (famous Forty Elks chorus). "Night of Love" (Lucrezia Bori and Lawrance Tibbett), "Cavalleria Rusticana" (Creatore's band). "The Moon has Raised Her Lamp Above" (John McCormack and Reginald Werrenrath). Radio talk by Harry Simmons (station engineer), listeners' requests: "Casse-Nolsette" (Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra). "At Santa Barbara" (Peter Dawson), "Les Deux Alouettes" (Bechstein Welte reproduced piano). "March of the Toys" and "Babes in Toyland" (Light Opera Company with orchestra). "God Save the King." To-morrow Evening.— Dance programme.[104]

1931 06[edit]
1931 07[edit]

BROADCAST PROGRAMMES. . . . 6ML. . . . To-morrow Evening.— "An Evening of Fun," and a radio talk by Mr. H. Simmons.[105]

1931 08[edit]
1931 09[edit]

PURCHASERS' STORIES. Land and Homes Inquiry. FURTHER EVIDENCE. Among the witnesses heard today by the Royal Commissioner (Mr. Justice Dwyer) who is inquiring into the operations of Land and Homes (W.A.) Ltd., was one who said he was a Pole and could not read the contract he signed, another who said she left her glasses at home and also could not read the contract, and got the wrong block, and a third who said he signed in a hurry under the belief that it was a hire-purchase agreement from which he could withdraw simply by forfeiting payments he had made. Mr. Ross McDonald (instructed by Robinson, Cox and Wheatley, is presenting the case for the purchasers, and Mr. F. W. Leake (instructed by Northmore, Hale, Davy and Leake) is watching the interests of the company. . . . HIS SCOUTMASTER. Henry Trethowan Simmons, in charge of the transmitting plant at 6ML, and living in Mt. Lawley, said that in March, 1930, he was taken to Westminster Garden City with men named Bennett and Roach. Bennett was formerly a Scoutmaster of witness, and came to see witness at Musgrove's. He spoke of a block that another Scout had had and could not pay for, and he wanted witness to take it over. Eventually, thinking that he could drop the purchase merely by forfeiting his deposit, he signed what Lilburne and Bennett told him was a hire-purchase agreement. When he was pressed to sign it was seven minutes to 11 o'clock, and as witness had to start the transmitter at 11 he was in a hurry to get away. When he found he could not keep up the payments he sought to drop the purchase, but proceedings were taken and judgment obtained against him. . .[106]

LAND AND HOMES LTD. COMMISSIONS INQUIRY. Fourteen More Witnesses. After an adjournment from August 28, the Royal Commissioner (Mr. Justice Dwyer) appointed to inquire into the activities of Land and Homes (W.A). Ltd., resumed his sittings yesterday. Forty-seven witnesses had been heard when the Commission adjourned and a further fourteen were examined at yesterday's session. Mr. Ross McDonald (instructed by Messrs. Robinson, Cox and Wheatley) is appearing for the committee formed by purchasers of land from the company, and Mr. F. W. Leake (instructed by Messrs. Northmore, Hale, Davy and Leake) for Land and Homes (W.A.). Ltd. Mr. McDonald opened the proceedings with a request that letters containing com-plaints from twenty or thirty country purchasers should be admitted as evidence. . . . Henry Trethowan Simmons, radio-transmitter, residing at Mt. Lawley, said that in March, 1930, he went to Westminster Garden City estate with a man named Bennett and a man named Roche. Witness knew Bennett as a former scoutmaster and had a high opinion of him. Bennett showed him a block which he said had belonged to another scout who was unable to carry on the payments. Witness was in a hurry to get back to his employment and suggested that the business should stand over. Bennett said: "Oh, it is only an ordinary hire-purchase agreement." On that understanding, believing that he could drop the purchase at any time by forfeiting anything he had paid, he signed a form which was presented to him folded, and pinned to a three-ply board. He later found that he could not make the necessary payments and desired to discontinue the purchase. Proceedings were taken against him and judgment was secured.[107]

1931 10[edit]
1931 11[edit]
1931 12[edit]

1932[edit]

1932 01[edit]
1932 02[edit]

BROADCASTING. Altering Aerial of 6ML. Two workmen were engaged on the roof of Musgrove's, Ltd., on Friday altering the aerial of the company's B class broadcasting station, 6ML. The director of the station (Mr. F. C. Kingston), when asked the reason for the change, said that the chief engineer of the station (Mr. H. Simmonds) had been visiting the Eastern States recently and had inspected all of the stations in Melbourne and Adelaide in search of new ideas. Mr. Simmonds had accumulated some useful suggestions for improvement of plant, and these would be tested. He had also seen developments which justified a change in the aerial which had been contemplated by the company for some considerable time, and which was now being put into effect. The aerial was being changed from an inverted L type to a T type. This was expected to give better radiation and to ensure that the maximum power was radiated and none lost in the aerial system. It was hoped to have the alteration completed in time for tomorrow night's broadcast. Mr. Kingston added that the T type aerial would have been installed when the station was built had sufficient width of span between the masts been available. The reduction of wave length from 297 to 264 metres a few months ago had made the change possible.[108]

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Norman Wilfred Simmons must have family ties to Henry Trethowan Simmons

CORRESPONDENCE. WIRELESS DEVELOPMENT. (To The Editor.) Sir, — A cable message under the heading "Wireless Development," which appeared in your issue of today, does not reveal anything startling relative to wireless development. Apparently the sender of the cablegram is not thoroughly conversant with present-day wireless, and his message is very misleading in many respects. The adoption of "Class B" amplification to battery-operated sets by Australian radio manufacturers has been practised for almost two years, also being used in transmitters for a number of years. Class B valves, of American manufacture, have been in use for a considerable period in Australia. The statement that two watts undistorted output is sufficient to fill a concert hall is entirely wrong, as it is recognised by leading authorities, that even a small hall requires at least five watts output to give satisfactory service. The statement that "even the largest sets operated off electric mains are capable of only 1½ watts," is erroneous. The Midget all-electric radio receiver has an output of 2½ watts; these have been in operation in Australia for more than two years, and the largest sets have a greater output, to say nothing of the modern public address systems, talkies, etc., that use audio amplification, operating off electric mains. The new "Ferrocast" coils, produced by a German radio engineer, are a resurrection of an old type with small improvement. The use of iron or magnetic cores for coils is by no means new, as we have in present-day sets iron cores in transformers and chokes used in the audio frequency side. The reason for the discarding of iron cores in radio frequency transformers was the introduction of very high hysteresis and eddy current losses. The new magnetic material "Ferrocast," consists of minute particles of a high-grade magnetic material of such a structure that they, in themselves are very free from losses, resulting in an iron core radio frequency transformer having a high frequency resistance of about one-third of the usual type of coil used commercially. Selectivity under these circumstances is very much improved, and when a set is used where there are a number of broadcasting stations operating with only a small margin between their respective wave lengths, selectivity is of primary importance, but in other areas this degree of selectivity is oft-times detrimental to the quality of reception, resulting in the cutting of the side bands and losing the overtones that make the musical notes so pleasant to the ear. Regarding the metallic rectifier, this has been extensively used in radio for many years, but the adaption of this to the rectification of the incoming signal in radio sets has been experimented with in Australia for some time past. It will replace the detector valve and may give a little better quality, but will only make a slight improvement, if any, and will in no way affect modern design of radio receivers. America is recognised throughout the world as the leaders in the radio set construction field, and Australia is almost on a par with her, many Australian inventions and designs having been adopted by overseas manufacturers. The slow development in England has been due to excessive imports and to technical difficulties associated with the use of multifarious wave bands, common in England and Europe. Wireless development will certainly continue, but the Australian manufactured set of three years ago is still giving good and faithful service. The majority of new inventions and ideas connected with radio are slowly developed and tested before being commercialised. For instance, some years back the newspapers startled the world with the announcement of the "Stenode," which was to revolutionise radio receivers, but it has not yet been placed on the market. Obviously from the foregoing, the slow development of radio set manufacture in England, as com-pared with America and Australia is perhaps responsible for the cablegram which savours of "taking coals to Newcastle." The paragraph as published would tend to corrupt the radio-mindedness of your readers, and statements pointing out that "existing sets will be made obsolete" are, to say the least, very misleading. Many inventions will come along, some improvements or refinements, some proving otherwise, but today a good radio set, like the motor car, will give the owner pleasure and entertainment for many years and will not become "obsolete" overnight.— Yours, etc., N. W. SIMMONS, A.A.R.E. 6KG, Kalgoorlie, April 11.[109]

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NEW WIRELESS STATION. EQUIPMENT FOR 6IX. Largely of Local Manufacture. Considerable interest was aroused yesterday by the display in one of the windows of Lyric House, Murray-street, Perth, of portion of the transmitter for the new "B" class wireless broadcasting station, 6IX which is expected to be on the air during November. The transmitter and the aerial system will be at Newspaper House, and the main studios will be at Lyric House. There will also be a news studio at Newspaper House to enable the prompt transmission of important news. The window display, includes the microphone, into which all announcements are made, the speech amplifier, which picks up and amplifies the minute currents from the microphone and the record pickup, and the drive panel, which next receives the current. This panel generates the carrier wave, which will be 204 metres, or 1,470 kilocycles. In it is the very latest type of temperature control oven, by which the crystal operating is kept always at the same temperature. The panel also modulates the signal received from the speech amplifier, and passes it on to the main amplifier in the form of modulated radio frequency. The signal passes through, a final amplifier, before it enters the aerial and is sent over the air to listeners. Other units in the window include a big rectifier, which supplies direct current to all units of the transmitter and which supplies a maximum voltage of 5,000 volts, and a tuning panel, which tunes the final amplifier. There is also a variable transmitting condenser with a capacity of 0.0001 microfarads. This was designed by Mr. H. T. Simmons, chief engineer of 6ML (W.A. Broadcasters, Ltd.), and was manufactured by Mr. F. A. Lee. of Perth. The station director of W.A. Broadcasters, Ltd. (Mr. F. C. Kingston) said yesterday that, with the exception of this condenser, the microphone and the speech amplifier, the whole plant had been designed and built by the chief engineer and the engineering staff of the company. Mr. Kingston said that the plant contained the very latest ideas, including a special modulating transformer, which was now being adopted by the leading stations of the world, and is superseding the choke system of modulation. A feature new to Australia was the filament rectifier, which supplied current to all filaments instead of a filament generator, which was usual. A system of electromagnetic control had been installed in place of the older manual control. This meant that the plant would be started up and operated by the pressing of buttons instead of manual switches. It had been so arranged that if any part of the transmitter failed, the whole plant would be automatically switched off. The appearance of the apparatus and the method of assembly compared very favourably with that of any station in Australia, said Mr. Kingston, emphasising that the plant was almost entirely of local manufacture.[110]

1933 11[edit]

WIRELESS. 6IX NEXT WEEK. NEW RADIO STATION. Description of Transmitter. Radio enthusiasts will be pleased to learn that the new broadcasting station, 6IX, Perth, will be on the air next week, probably on Monday night. This new station, which will operate on 204 metres (about 17 degrees lower than 6ML on the tuning dial), is controlled by W.A. Broadcasters, Ltd., and will greatly add to the radio entertainment activities in this State, providing another welcome change of station. The equipment of the new station throughout is of the latest and best designs procurable and to the technically minded there are many devices of great interest in the new transmitter. The studios of 6IX, with the exception of the 'news' studio, are at Lyric House, Murray-street, and consist of a main studio and second studio, with a control room having vision of both studios, said the chief engineer of the company (Mr. H. T. Simmons) yesterday. The main studio has positions for three microphones of the condenser type, together with two record turntables and pickups, while the second studio is equipped with a condenser microphone and two record turntables. The main studio is used for the appearance of artists, and the second studio for recorded numbers. The only apparatus at Lyric House be-sides microphone and pickups is the control panel and speech amplifier, which are housed in a special "control room" completely screened by copper mesh. This is necessary to eliminate interference from 6ML, the transmitter of which is only 50ft. distant. The copper screening is earthed, and the radio frequency prevented from entering the various circuits in the control room. By means of the control panel, the various microphones, pickups and relays are brought into operation and the small currents therefrom are passed on to the speech amplifier and amplified to the desired strength before being passed over the direct transmission lines to Newspaper House. The speech amplifier is a very modern piece of apparatus, and operates entirely from the 250 volt mains, rectifying both low and high tension voltages for its own use. Indirectly heated D.C. valves are used in the first and second stages, while the third stage is a pair of 5 watt valves in push pull, giving a high audio output. A vacuum tube volume indicator is installed, so that the operator may keep the amplification at the same level for different artists or records, without having to rely entirely on the ear, which is not nearly as quick as the eye in perceiving changes in volume or strength. Five Units. From Lyric House, the amplified currents from the microphones and pickups travel over the special transmission lines to Newspaper House where the actual transmitter is located. The transmitter at 6IX consists of five panels or units, and is capable of supplying 750 watts of 100 per cent, modulated radio frequency current to the aerial system. Each unit has a specific function to perform. The control unit by means of automatic switches operated by current from the mains, switches on each of the circuits in the correct order, switching off automatically if any of the circuits are out of adjustment. This means that if a valve burns out, the automatic switchgear would immediately switch off the high tension current, preventing the remaining valves suffering from the effects of overloading. The engineer on duty would then replace the valve with a new one, push a switch and the automatic switchgear would be thrown into operation, switching on each circuit correctly. The rectifier unit contains apparatus new to Western Australia, in the form of a three phase full wave rectifier, capable of supplying 20 volts, 75 amperes, to light all the filaments of the valves. Usually a motor generator is used for this purpose, but at 6IX this moving machinery is replaced by stationary apparatus which proves to be more reliable and at the same time more economical to operate. The other apparatus in the rectifier provides 5,000 volts at 1 ampere, and 2,000 volts at 500 milliamps for supplying anode current to all valves. Both high and low tension rectifiers are fitted with inductor regulators to keep the output voltage constant and correct, so that if the power from the mains rises or falls below normal the inductor regulators compensate for the difference. The drive panel performs the important function of generating the oscillation, the frequency of which is 1,470,000 times per second, corresponding to a wavelength of 204.8 metres. This frequency is kept constant by a quartz crystal and to obtain a still greater degree of accuracy, and less chance of frequency variation, the crystal is enclosed in an airproof chamber and kept at a temperature of 130 degrees Fah-renheit, ensuring that the temperature about the crystal will remain the same both summer and winter. The temperature is maintained automatically by a thermostat which switches the heating units off when the temperature rises above 130 degrees Fahrenheit, and on when it falls below. The oscillator valve is a 10 watt valve, which passes on the current it generates to a 75 watt screen grid valve of the latest type. This amplifies the cur-rent and passes it on to a 250 watt amplifier valve. The Modulating Transformer. The current sent from the control room at the studio is fed into a submodulator, which is a 50 watt valve, and this in turn passes it to the 500 watt modulating valve. By means of a special modulating transformer the low frequency or speech currents from the modulating valve are passed into the anode circuit of the 250 watt valve carrying the high frequency currents. This transformer has two windings, each matched to the impedence of the valve circuit in which they are included. The transformer method of modulation gives a much higher percentage of efficiency than the choke system, which is usually employed, and is an innovation in Western Australia. The fourth panel contains the high power amplifier which is capable of supplying from 1,500 to 1,800 watts of power to the tuning panel. It also houses the bias rectifier system which supplies bias volt-age to all valves in the plant. The bias rectifier is fitted with a special cutout, so that if the bias fails for any reason, it causes the automatic switchgear to function and switches off all units. Pilot lamps on the control panel indicate the portion of apparatus which caused failure. The fifth panel is the tuning panel, which tunes the main amplifier to the correct frequency and passes the current on to the feeder lines which carry the current to the roof where the aerial system is erected. Here two lattice steel masts 130ft. in height support the aerial, a single stranded copper conductor containing seven wires of 16 gauge twisted together. The masts are 200 feet apart, and the lead-in from the aerial comes directly from the centre of the aerial vertically to the tuning house, midway between the masts. The tuning house contains inductances and condensers which tune the aerial to the correct wave length, and match the feeder lines to the tuning apparatus in the transmitting room. The feeder lines conduct the current to the aerial without radiating any power, thereby conserving power to be radiated by the actual aerial system and making for increased efficiency.[111]

NEW "B" CLASS STATION. MANY SPECIAL FEATURES PLANNED. INAUGURAL BROADCAST TONIGHT A FIRST-CLASS PROGRAMME. The State's new "B" class broadcasting station, 6IX (Perth), operated by W.A. Broadcasters, Ltd., on a wave length of 204.8 metres, will officially commence transmissions tonight. The range of organised radio entertainment available to the rapidly-growing radio public in Western Australia will be increased by the arrangement by which 6IX will provide alternate programmes from morning to night to the State's pioneer "B" class station, 6ML, ensuring a complete dual service throughout the week from these stations. The new station incorporates the latest in broadcasting methods and design. The masts of the transmitter, towering 135 feet above Newspaper House, have already become a striking feature of the city's skyline, being, from street level, higher than any other broadcasting aerial in the State. Tonight the opening ceremony will be performed at 8 o'clock by the President of the Legislative Council (Sir John Kirwan), and will be followed by a special programme lasting until 11 o'clock. The need for a powerful new "B" class station is shown by the vast growth in the number of broadcast listeners' licences in the State, from 4,122 in 1929 to 24,000 in 1933, the latter figure indicating the number of households that habitually listen in. Approximately, therefore, there are already quite 100,000 people in Western Australia who regularly depend for amusement on radio programmes, and to these 6IX should prove a boon. The station is operated by W.A. Broadcasters, Ltd., which focuses the radio interests of West Australian Newspapers, Ltd., and Musgrove's, Ltd., and which also operates the pioneer "B" class station 6ML, and the value of this alliance lies in the fact that it permits of the programmes of the two stations being arranged so as to provide entertainment to suit all tastes and, at the same time, to prevent overlapping of subject. A big improvement in radio entertainment should therefore result from the combination of a large modern newspaper organisation and a music house with years of broadcasting experience and the specialised ability to understand entertainment needs. News Services. One innovation at 6IX will be the establishment of three special new 10-minute evening news broadcast services, at 7.50, 8.50 and 9.50 o'clock, which will be prepared and supplied by the staff of "The West Australian." It is anticipated that this news service will be something entirely new in Australian broadcasting as it will keep people posted in the very latest news as it arrives. The "news" studio is situated at Newspaper House. Another want that 6IX should fill is the provision of a better Sunday service, and the avoidance of overlapping programmes such as sporting talks on Friday nights and the results of different events on Saturday evenings. On Sundays 6IX will henceforward provide musical programmes from 9.30 a.m., and a church service at 7.30 p.m. from a church of one of the leading denominations, after which the session continues with music until 10.30. On Friday and Saturday evenings, when other stations are handling sporting subjects, 6IX will provide musical items, for which hundreds of listeners have already expressed a desire. Between them, stations 6IX and 6ML will from Monday to Friday provide continuous programmes between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m. To do this, a capable staff, first class equipment and careful organisation, are needed, and the management of W.A. Broadcasters, Ltd., is confident of entire success in its new policy. On Saturdays, between 7 a.m. and 12 midnight, one or other of these stations will be continuously on the air, except between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m., and 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. On Sun-days 6IX will enter a field that is now unoccupied. Personalities. The leading personalities associated with stations 6IX and 6ML are Messrs. F. C. Kingston, station director; B. Samuel, station manager; Paul Daly, chief announcer at 6IX and producer to the management; Eric Donald, chief announcer at 6ML; Ned Taylor, the "early bird" at 6ML; and H. T. Simmons, chief engineer. (Start Photo Caption) A corner of the interior of 6IX studio at Lyric House; Part of the interior of the transmitting room at 6IX, Newspaper House.(End Photo Caption)[112]

OFFICIAL OPENING. 6IX NEWSPAPER HOUSE. TRANSMITTING PLANT. MANY NEW FEATURES. The studios of 6IX, with the exception of the "news" studio, are at Lyric House, Murray-street, and consist of a main studio and second studio, with a control room having vision of both studios, said the chief engineer of the company (Mr. H. T. Simmons) yesterday. The main studio has positions for three microphones of the condenser type, together with two record turntables and pickups, while the second studio is equipped with a condenser microphone and two record turntables. The main studio is used for the appearance of artists, and the second studio for recorded numbers. The only apparatus at Lyric House besides microphone and pickups is the control panel and speech amplifier, which are housed in a special "control room" completely screened by copper mesh. This is necessary to eliminate interference from 6ML, the transmitter of which is only 50ft. distant. The copper screening is earthed, and the radio frequency, prevented from entering the various circuits in the control room. By means of the control panel, the various microphones, pickups and relays are brought into operation and the small currents therefrom are passed on to the speech amplifier and amplified to the desired strength before being passed over the direct transmission lines to Newspaper House. The speech amplifier is a very modern piece of apparatus, and operates entirely from the 250 volt mains, rectifying both low and high tension voltages for its own use. Indirectly heated D.C. valves are used in the first and second stages, while the third stage is a pair of 5 watt valves in push pull, giving a high audio output. A vacuum tube volume indicator is installed, so that the operator may keep the amplification at the same level for different artists or records, without having to rely entirely on the ear, which is not nearly as quick as the eye in perceiving changes in volume or strength. Five Units. From Lyric House, the amplified currents from the microphones and pickups travel over the special transmission lines to Newspaper House where the actual transmitter is located. The transmitter at 6IX consists of five panels or units, and is capable of supplying 750 watts of 100 per cent. modulated radio frequency cur-rent to the aerial system. Each unit has a specific function to perform. The control unit by means of automatic switches operated by current from the mains, switches on each of the circuits in the correct order, switching off automatically if any of the circuits are out of adjustment. This means that if a valve burns out, the automatic switchgear would immediately switch off the high tension current, preventing the remaining valves suffering from the effects of overloading. The engineer on duty would then replace the valve with a new one, push a switch and the automatic switchgear would be thrown into operation, switching on each circuit correctly. The rectifier unit contains apparatus new to Western Australia, in the form of a three phase full wave rectifier, capable of supplying 20 volts, 75 amperes, to light all the filaments of the valves. Usually a motor generator is used for this purpose, but at 6IX this moving machinery is replaced by stationary apparatus which proves to be more reliable and at the same time more economical to operate. The other apparatus in the rectifier provides 5,000 volts at 1 ampere, and 2,000 volts at 500 milliamps for supplying anode current to all valves. Both high and low tension rectifiers are fitted with inductor regulators to keep the output voltage constant and correct, so that if the power from the mains rises or falls below normal the inductor regulators compensate for the difference. The drive panel performs the important function of generating the oscillation, the frequency of which is 1,470,000 times per second, corresponding to a wavelength of 204.8 metres. This frequency is kept constant by a quartz crystal and to obtain a still greater degree of accuracy, and less chance of frequency variation, the crystal is enclosed in an airproof chamber and kept at a temperature of 130 degrees Fahrenheit, ensuring that the temperature about the crystal will remain the same both summer and winter. The temperature is maintained automatically by a the-mostat which switches the heating units off when the temperature rises above 130 degrees Fahrenheit, and on when it falls below. The oscillator valve is a 10 watt valve, which passes on the current it generates to a 75 watt screen grid valve of the latest type. This amplifies the cur-rent and passes it on to a 250 watt amplifier valve. The Modulating Transformer. The current sent from the control room at the studio is fed into a submodulator, which is a 50 watt valve, and this in turn passes it to the 500 watt modulating valve. By means of a special modulating trans-former the low frequency or speech cur-rents from the modulating valve are passed into the anode circuit of the 250 watt valve carrying the high frequency currents. This transformer has two windings, each matched to the impedence of the valve circuit in which they are included. The transformer method of modulation gives a much higher percentage of efficiency than the choke system which is usually employed, and is an innovation in Western Australia. The fourth panel contains the high power amplifier which is capable of supplying from 1,500 to 1,800 watts of power to the tuning panel. It also houses the bias rectifier system which supplies bias voltage to all valves in the plant. The bias rectifier is fitted with a special cutout, so that if the bias fails for any reason, it causes the automatic switchgear to function and switches off all units. Pilot lamps on the control panel indicate the portion of apparatus which caused failure. The fifth panel is the tuning panel, which tunes the main amplifier to the correct frequency and passes the current on to the feeder lines which carry the current to the roof where the aerial system is erected. Here two lattice steel masts 130ft. in height support the aerial, a single stranded copper conductor containing seven wires of 16 gauge twisted together. The masts are 200 feet apart, and the lead-in from the aerial comes directly from the centre of the aerial vertically to the tuning house, midway between the masts. The tuning house contains inductances and condensers which tune the aerial to the correct wave length, and match the feeder lines to the tuning apparatus in the transmitting room. The feeder lines conduct the current to the aerial without radiating any power, thereby conserving power to be radiated by the actual aerial system and making for increased efficiency.[113]

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1935[edit]

MARRIAGE

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SOCIAL and PERSONAL. . . . Messrs. Phipps, Buckeridge and Simmons, technical officers of W.A. Broadcasters, Limited, visited Katanning on Monday to institute inquiries regarding a site for the proposed "B" class broadcasting station to be installed in connection with 6IX and 6ML.[114]

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1936[edit]

1936 01[edit]

NEW RADIO STATION. PLANS FOR NEW "B" CLASS STATION. 6ML-IX ENGINEER LEAVES FOR THE EAST. Western Australian listeners can now look forward with certainty to a new "B" class country transmitter. Preliminary work in connection with the erection by W.A. Broadcasters, Ltd., of a relay station near Katanning has been so speeded up in the past few weeks that now practically all that remains to be done is the selection and purchase of the equipment and its installation. The new station will have the call sign 6WB and, with a power in the aerial of 2,000 watts, will operate on a wave length of 280.3 metres. It will be connected by land line with the Perth studios of W.A. Broadcasters, and its main work will be the relaying of programmes from 6IX, although it is possible that some 6ML broadcasts will also be taken. In addition, essential news and market services for the special benefit of people on the land may be given independently. The site that has been selected and approved is a five-acre plot, 4½ miles north-west of Katanning, at an altitude of about 1,100 feet above sea level. This is one of the highest spots in the Katanning district, and at present is the fallowed field of a farming property. The area to be served by 6WB has a greater density of licenses than any other country area in the State, it being estimated from figures supplied by the Postmaster-General's Department that within a radius of about 100 miles from the transmitter approximately 9,427 of the State's country listening public of 10,700 are centred. These figures do not, of course, include listeners in the metropolitan area, who should have no difficulty in tuning in the new station. It is expected that more distant areas such as those around Merredin and even Kalgoorlie will also be served. Station 6WB will be essentially a country relay station, catering especially for the interests of the rural listening public. The hours of transmission have not yet been fully determined, but it is believed that they will largely coincide with those of 6IX, although there is the possibility of separate breakfast and dinner sessions originating at the Katanning transmitter itself. Detailed points of the programme makeup are still being considered, and here, too, nothing definite has been decided. Nothing much can be done in fact until the return from the Eastern States of the chief engineer of 6IX (H. T. Simmons), who left Perth recently by the Great Western express to investigate the matter of the most suitable technical equipment and to place orders accordingly. His work will take him as far afield as Brisbane, where he will pay special attention to the new type of quarter-wave aerial system recently put into operation by 4AK. On his recommendation the type of aerial system to be used by 6WB will depend, although it is considered likely that a single mast will be erected. No effort will be spared to secure the most modern equipment and to assemble and operate it according to the latest trends of radio transmission. Apart from the transmission room and other construction necessitated by the water-cooling system that will be used, there will be a further building to act as the engineers' quarters. There will probably be one engineer residing at the station and another living privately — possibly in Katanning — when off duty, and both may be called on to act as announcers for either emergency or independent transmissions. Alterations in the Perth studios have also been hinted, and it is quite possible that the increased work will bring about another studio in the present building in Murray Street, Perth. Things will be more or less left in abeyance here until the return of Mr Simmons in a few weeks' time. The matter of a landline to Katanning will receive attention, and then, with the purchase and arrival of the plant, work will commence on the actual erection of the station. When this begins it should not be many months before the new station is on the air.[115]

New Radio Station. 6WB TO BE ERECTED AT KATANNING. BETTER SERVICE FOR ALBANY LISTENERS. Radio listeners on the Great Southern can now look forward with certainty to a new "B" class country transmitter. This is of especial interest to enthusiasts in Albany, where at present daylight reception is very meagre. Preliminary work in connection with the erection by W.A. Broadcasters, Ltd., of a relay station near Katanning has been so speeded up in the past few weeks that now practically all that remains to be done is the selection and purchase of the equipment and its installation. The new station will have the call sign 6WB and, with a power in the aerial of 2,000 watts, will operate on a wave length of 280.3 metres. It will be connected by land line with the Perth studios of W.A. Broadcasters, and its main work will be the relaying of programmes from 6IX, although it is possible that some 6ML broadcasts will also be taken. In addition, essential news and market services for the special benefit of people on the land may be given independently. The site that has been selected and approved is a five-acre plot, 4½ miles north-west of Katanning, at an altitude of about 1,100 feet above sea level. This is one of the highest spots in the Katanning district, and at present is the fallowed field of a farming property. The area to be served by 6WB has a greater density of licenses than any other country area in the State, it being estimated from figures supplied by the Postmaster-General's Department that within a radius of about 100 miles from the transmitter approximately 9,427 of the State's country listening public of 10,700 are centred. These figures do not, of course, include listeners in the metropolitan area, who should have no difficulty in tuning in the new station. It is expected that more distant areas such as those around Merredin and even Kalgoorlie will also be served. Station 6WB will be essentially a country relay station, catering especially for the interests of the rural listening public. The hours of transmission have not yet been fully determined, but it is believed that they will largely coincide with those of 6IX, although there is the possibility of separate breakfast and dinner sessions originating at the Katanning transmitter itself. Detailed points of the programme makeup are still being considered, and here, too, nothing definite has been decided. Nothing much can be done in fact until the return from the Eastern States of the chief engineer of 6IX (H. T. Simmons), who left Perth recently by the Great Western express to investigate the matter of the most suitable technical equipment and to place orders accordingly. His work will take him as far afield as Brisbane, where he will pay special attention to the new type of quarter-wave aerial system recently put into operation by 4AK. On his recommendation the type of aerial system to be used by 6WB will depend, although it is considered likely that a single mast will be erected. No effort will be spared to secure the most modern equipment and to assemble and operate it according to the latest trends of radio transmission. Apart from the transmission room and other construction necessitated by the water-cooling system that will be used, there will be a further building to act as the engineers' quarters. There will probably be one engineer residing at the station and another living privately — possibly in Katanning — when off duty, and both may be called on to act as announcers for either emergency or independent transmissions. Alterations in the Perth studios have also been hinted, and it is quite possible that the increased work will bring about another studio in the present building in Murray Street, Perth. Things will be more or less left in abeyance here until the return of Mr. Simmons in a few weeks' time. The matter of a landline to Katanning will receive attention, and then, with the purchase and arrival of the plant, work will commence on the actual erection of the station. When this begins it should not be many months before the new station is on the air.[116]

1936 02[edit]

MINDING or 6WB KATANNING? WHICH WILL BE OPERATING FIRST? The announcement of W.A. Broadcasters Limited that building operations on their new station, 6WB, about 4½ miles out of Katanning, will commence almost immediately, comes as a challenge to the Director-General of Postal Services (Mr. H. P. Brown) and the station 6WA. Minding, or 6WA, was promised some years ago, and when, many months after it was definitely announced that the station would be constructed, work started early last year, people in this district had fond hopes of listening to their own station by June; but, alas! February is here and Minding is still "under construction." And now comes the announcement by W.A. Broadcasters Ltd., that Mr. H. T. Simmons, their chief engineer, had just returned from the Eastern States, where he had purchased the equipment for the new "B" class station. 6WB is promised completion by June. Will the same fate befall it? Both 6WA (National Station) and the new "B" station will be connected to Perth by land lines and will relay, in the first instance, the programme of 6WF, and in the latter case the programmes of 6IX and 6ML. In both stations there will be emergency studios in case of accident to the land lines. As far as the "race" is concerned, Minding has a good start, as only the mast remains to be erected and the equipment installed, but despite the fact that £50,000 has been put aside for the construction of the national station, 6WB stands every chance of being on the air first. Mr. D. J. Abercrombie, engineer of Standard Telephones and Cables (A/asia) Ltd. has just arrived at Minding from the Eastern States to supervise the installation of the technical equipment.[117]

1936 03[edit]

Norman Wilfred Simmons

GOLDFIELDS BROADCASTING. NEW TRANSMISSION STATION. OFFICIAL OPENING. The official opening of 6KG Kalgoorlie's newly installed high fidelity transmission station at Parkeston last evening marked another milestone in the history of Goldfields Broadcasters 1933, Ltd. Among those at the station were the State Radio Inspector, Mr. G. A. Scott, the District Postal Inspector, Mr. W. Dunham, and the Chief Traffic Manager of the Commonwealth Government Railways, Mr. Artlett. An idea of the efficiency of the new plant may be gleaned from the fact that last night broadcasts were made from the transmitter at Parkeston from Nos. 1, 2 and 3 studios in Hannan street and from the Railway Institute. The amount of work and equipment entailed in carrying out programmes of this nature is considerable, and it has been stated that at least no B class station in the State actually does the same amount of relays and live artist work that 6KG does. The opening last evening was a gala night for 6KG, and the broadcast continued until midnight. The celebration of the opening will be continued on the air throughout the month. At the new station a small party gathered to celebrate the event in festive spirit. The Goldfields Highland Pipe Band assisted in the entertainment. The managing director of Goldfields Broadcasters 1933, Ltd., Mr. F. P. Hicks, preceded the official opening with a few remarks in which he paid tribute to the competence of the technical staff of the company, who under the guidance of Mr. N. W. Simmons, were responsible for the construction and efficiency of the plant, which was designed and built on the goldfields. Reports, he said, from as far north as Onslow and Northampton, as far south as Esperance and Albany, and east to Rawlinna, and from the metropolitan area testified to the efficiency and quality of the broadcasts from 6KG. Previously they had broadcast to thousands of people, but radio had made such strides that now the number would be ten times as great. The plant was the first high fidelity transmission plant in the State. The programmes voluntarily contributed by live artists were of a high standard and the station was deeply grateful to all those artists. It was noteworthy that news had been received that a constant performer over 6KG, in the person of Mr. Ainslie Beecraft, had received an engagement with the Australian Broadcasting Commission in Sydney, and would be singing at the opening of the Radio Exhibition on Thursday evening at the Sydney Town Hall. It was gratifying that the local station had been able to assist him in some measure to attain that high honour. The station covered the whole of the State and was particularly well received in the metropolitan area, concluded Mr. Hicks. In declaring the new transmission station officially open, the chairman of the Kalgoorlie Roads Board, Mr. W. Hall, after apologising for the unavoidable absence of the Mayor of Kalgoorlie, Mr. E. E. Brimage, and the Mayor of Boulder, Mr. W. F. Coath, said that 6KG had put Kalgoorlie on the map as far as wireless was concerned. It had been a great boon to people in the outback areas of the State. Mr. Hall wished the company success in the new venture, and hoped that the B class station received the support and patronage that it richly deserved.[118]

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1941 - 6MD Merredin Commences

6MD. FURTHER PROGRESS MADE. SITE PURCHASED. During this week further progress was made in connection with the proposed new broadcasting station to be erected at Merredin, when Messrs. Henry Greig (Director), F. C. Kingston (State manager), Bryn Samuel (manager) and Harry Simons (chief engineer) of W.A. Broadcasters Ltd., visited Merredin for the purpose of finalising the purchase of a site. In all the company had six sites under observation, and the one finally selected was 25 acres of the property of Mrs. A. H. Robartson, situated opposite the Merredin State Experimental Farm on the Great eastern Highway 4½ miles from Merredin. The representatives of the company expressed pleasure on being able to secure such a favourable site and it is now hoped the 6MD will be on the air by Christmas. The plant will consist of a 500 watt transmitter and 50,00 [sic] feet of copper will be buried to comprise the earth. The transmitter buildings will be lit up by a Diesel electric light plant, whilst residences will be built for the company's technicians. The programme will be relayed from Perth by land line and the associated stations will be 6ML, 6IX and 6WB (Katanning.) The new station will fill a long-felt want in the important Eastern and North-Eastern Wheatbelts, when at the present time only the programme from the big National Station are heard with any pleasure at all. Arrangements for a suitable official opening of the new 6MD will receive attention at a later date, and no doubt the extent of the celebrations will depend largely upon the progress of the world conflict now raging. Merredin has quite a live Musical Society, and might we suggest early that their co-operation be sought to enable a local programme to comprise portion of the opening celebrations in connection with the new station.[119]

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NEWS AND NOTES. . . . Wireless Telegraphy Classes. Special classes for wireless-telegraphy reservists of the Royal Australian Air Force will commence at the R.A.A.F. No. 4 Recruiting Centre, Perth, tomorrow night. The classes have been arranged by Mr. H. T. Simmons, chairman of the Institute of Radio Engineers (W.A. Division) in conjunction with Sergeant L. Noble, trade testing officer at the recruiting centre. They are designed to give elementary instruction in the theory of radio and transmission and reception, and at present will take in about 30 reservists. The instructors will be Messrs. J. Austin, J. Tapper, N. Parker and G. Butterfield. The classes will be held at 7.30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays.[120]

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6WB. NEW MAST INSTALLED. Everybody has seen on the screen pictures of men climbing up and down the exterior of buildings and standing on parapets high above ground level and otherwise emulating the exploits of common housefly. We have enjoyed the sensation of height, or we have not, according to out individual makeup, but most of us are in agreement that the pictures are at least thrilling. Well, for the past week or so, it was possible to see these feats of climb and balance in the flesh very close to home, during the construction of the new aerial mast at the wireless station of 6WB. Without going into a mass of technicalities, the new mast is 230 feet in height, is constructed in the form of a rectangular pillar of light angle steel, braced and cross braced to give it tensile strength, and is tapered off to a blunt point which rests on a block of porcelain, just like a huge upended square-sided pencil. To watch its erection was even more thrilling than the pictures could be. The construction was carried out by Gordon Thompson, of Sidney Williams Ltd., who was assisted in the air by Mervyn Conning, and on the ground by Mr Harry Conning, Mervyn's father, with extra help from Tom Garstone, Mr Cyril Garstone's boy, who helped on the ground, spending as much time as he could up the mast. The 230 feet structure was erected in ten days, being mounted on a five ton concrete block which had been previously constructed in situ. To the people that have seen the 650 foot mast of 6WA and have attempted to count the number of guys that support it, it will come as a surprise to learn that this mast has only four guys, one at each comer of the mast, 115 feet up. They are affixed to four 7-ton blocks embedded in the ground. The mast itself was built up piece by piece, each piece of angle steel being numbered and lettered so that it would go in its right position. When the mast was about one hundred feet high, the heaviest lengths of metal were mounted, and two men were needed on the ground to hoist them up. Once up to the top of the mast each length was placed in position and was bolted there. Other lengths followed and in a remarkably short space of time were bolted in place as were the side and cross braces, and that fifteen foot section was completed. At this height the mast was not so very awe inspiring, and you could hear what the rigger said when he shouted from the top. Later on, when the mast was over 200 feet high, you had to watch the construction from a distance of about 200 feet or else suffer from a stiff neck. At that height the lengths were somewhat lighter and only one man was needed to haul them up. There was a slight wind blowing on ground level, and when the hauling started the rope bellied out until the length of steel was some 30 feet from the mast. As it got higher, however, the wind became stronger and by the time the length was approaching the top it was standing straight out from the rope like a ribbon. This one fact will give some idea of the conditions under which Thompson and the boy were working, yet they appeared to be enjoying themselves. It is interesting to note that Mervyn Conning, who most probably had never previously had been higher from the ground than he could climb bird-nesting, has taken to this type of work so efficiently that he is to accompany Gordon Thompson to Merredin, where they will paint a similar mast for 6MD, WA Broadcaster's relay station at that centre. Mr Harry Simmons, chief Engineer of WA Broadcasters Ltd., is now in Katanning, working with Mr 'George' Sirl, manager of 6WB, on the construction of the feeder line from the transmitter at the station to the mast. In due course the mast will be in operation and local listeners will then obtain even better reception than under existing conditions, and a wider circle of listeners in the outlying districts will be able to receive the station programmes. Mr J. Duggett, of Amalgamated Wireless Australia, is in Katanning at present to inspect the mast before it is finally handed over to W.A. Broadcasters. The mast will be under test this weekend, and if the tests are satisfactory, it will be in use as from then. There are still certain parts to arrive from A.W.A. before the electrical side of the mast construction is completed. It is interesting to note, that since a certain type of cable 'coaxial' for use on the feeder line, was unobtainable owing to defence demands, the 6WB engineers substituted for it using water piping as the outside of the cable.[121]

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Manager of 6IX — WB & MD Wireless stations, Mr. Samuel, accompanied by Messrs. Simmons and Hayman was a guest at the Hotel Merredin last weekend.[122]

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PERSONAL. . . . Mr Bryn Samuel, manager W. A. Broadcasters Ltd., and Mr Harry Simmons, chief engineer, spent two days in Katanning last week while on their annual visit to 6WB.[123]

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Divorce

WASN'T TOPS WITH HER "POP" Safety chains on doorways are handy little gadgets. They help to keep out burglars, prevent sozzled husbands from creeping inside unobtrusively during the early hours — and, of course, protect lovers who don t wish to be disturbed by unwanted visitors. Henry Trethowan Simmons had a chain on his hotel room door. And, as a safety measure, he made sure it was securely fastened. It was a good thing he did, too, because he was blissfully spending his time with Mrs. Elizabeth Paston Roots, with whom he had been working at a broadcasting network, when Mrs. Roots' husband, Cecil Frederick Roots and private inquiry agent Roy Mansfield's assistant tried to open the door without warning. Unable to get in, the intruders were compelled to rap on the woodwork and call out: "Are you there, Mr. Simmons?" Simmons made sure that the safety chain was in place before he walked over to the door and showed his face. He never got a chance to say anything before Roots, without mincing matters, said to him: "I want to come in. I believe my wife's in there with you!" No Chances. Simmons smiled, agreed to open the door promptly if they'd just stand back and allow him to shut the door first in order to remove the chain. But the Mansfield man and Roots weren't taking any chances. They made sure that the door remained open, and when Simmons insisted that he couldn't possibly open the door until they gave him a chance to take the chain clear, Roots warned: "I'll break in if you don't open up soon!" Simmons realised that Roots wasn't foolin." He slipped the chain from its catch, opened the door and let Roots and the sleuth enter. Elizabeth Roots was sitting on a single bed, resting her back against the wall. Roots noticed that she was without makeup and that her hair was disarranged. Elizabeth said nothing when her husband, by way of an explanation for his sudden visit, remarked bitterly: "If you'd been straight with me, I would have been straight with you!" Just Drinking! Simmons put in: "We were not doing anything wrong. We were simply having a drink." But Roots refused to accept that. "Do you know you're with a married .woman?" asked Mansfield's helper. Simmons said he did. Roots thought then that he'd learned enough to satisfy him that his suspicions about his wife's behaviour with Simmons hadn't been without foundation. He told Chief Justice Sir John Dwyer all about it when he stepped into the Divorce Court witness box this week and asked for his freedom. He was quite convinced that his wife hadn't been merely sitting on the bed listening to bedtime stories before he arrived, because Simmons was without his coat, collar or tie. He became curious about his wife, Roots told the court, when he saw her with Simmons after they'd had a bustup in March 1948. Apparently she first started associating with Simmons, he said, when she took employment with WA Broadcasters, where Simmons was also working. At Tennis. He heard something about them, got in touch with Mansfield and saw his wife and Simmons attend a tennis tournament together in December. But nothing happened on that occasion. So he went with Mansfield's assistant on the night of December 17, watched Simmons' room and, when he heard faint voices inside, decided to make a raid. Roots got a decree nisi on the ground of his wife's misconduct with Simmons. (Start Photo Caption) Henry Simmons (End Photo Caption) (Start Photo Caption) Mrs. Roots (End Photo Caption)[124]

THIS DOUBLE CAME OFF! It was a case of inquiry agent Roy Mansfield killing 2 birds with the one stone. This was achieved when he nabbed Henry Trethowan Simmons wooing Elizabeth Paston Roots in a city hotel. Because Mansfield had been doubly briefed: Cecil Frederic Roots had him chasing wife Elizabeth and Mrs. Sylvia Ellen May Simmons had him chasing hubby Henry. Roots got his divorce on March 2, came along again to the Divorce Court to offer the same testimony on behalf of Sylvia Simmons. Sylvia got her decree, too. And Simmons pays again. Sylvia, who lives in Bedford-st, Nedlands, wed Simmons in 1935, but the marriage was never happy, she told the Chief Justice. As early as 1935 they busted up over Henry's association with another woman. They were reconciled, however. Last October, Henry went East for a while. When he returned there was more trouble over his meandering affections, so Sylvia saw Mansfield. She knew he was acting for Roots as well, she said. She also knew that Henry Simmons had been seen around with Mrs. Roots. When Cecil Roots related what he saw in the city hotel bedroom, where his wife was found with Henry Simmons, the judge gave Sylvia her decree. Lawyer W. Blackwood handled her case. (Start Photo Caption) SIMMONS (End Photo Caption) (Start Photo Caption) MRS. ROOTS (End Photo Caption)[125]

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ca 1950 Harry Simmons married Elizabeth Paston Roots nee Mack. [126]

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Yornup Radio Station Takes Shape. A musical note, sounded intermittently, will be the first indication to local residents that radio station 6BY is operating at Yornup, said the chief engineer of the radio company (Mr. H. T. Simmons). Mr. Simmons estimated that five to seven weeks would be needed to erect the aerial, on which a start was made on Thursday last. Wind might hold up work. From the completion of the aerial until the station was in operation would require only three or four days, he added. Testing of the two transmitters will be carried out on a "dummy" aerial, said Mr. Simmons, and no time will then be wasted until the proper mast is ready. Half a mile behind the post office at Yornup lies the low, grey building which is the station. The main structure is square and half of it is taken up with the transmitting room, the remainder being a store room and a tiny sound-proofed studio. Although the aerial material is on the site it is not apparent to passers-by. The metal is spread out and lies half concealed by grass. One of the three houses at the site is already complete and when the others are finished they will have septic systems and hot-water systems. A local man helped to divine water, said Mr. Simmons. It was reckoned that permanent water lay at 30 feet, although just now test holes drew it at less than three feet. The diviner had plotted the course of an underground stream supposed to traverse the large field where the station stands, he added. Both radio engineers returned to Perth last weekend. They will return to Yornup on Monday. For the benefit of district residents who might have expected broadcasts featuring local people, Mr. Simmons said that most of the transmission would come from Perth, and that it was likely that even broadcasts of local interest would first be recorded, and then broadcast from Perth. Emergencies would be an exception, he went on. Fires and similar alarms would be broadcast direct from Yornup and, he understood, he said, that pronouncements by the local road board secretary or chairman could be made similarly.[127]

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AT CONTROLS. (Start Photo Caption) Watching the chief engineer of W.A. Broadcasters Pty. Ltd. (Mr. H. T. Simmons) at the control panel of station 6BY at Yornup, a few miles south of Bridgetown, company officials end an inspection of the State's latest broadcasting station. They are, from left, the chairman of directors (Sir Ross McDonald), the manager (Mr. Bryn Samuel) and a director (Mr. F. C. Kingston). (End Photo Caption) STATE NOW HAS 20 RADIO STATIONS. The State's 20th broadcasting station — 6BY, Bridgetown — was officially opened on Saturday night at the Bridgetown Town Hall by the chairman of directors of W.A. Broadcasters Pty. Ltd. (Sir Ross McDonald). Preliminary reports over a wide area indicate that the station is sending out a strong signal in a district which has been the despair of engineers. Operating on a wavelength of 333 metres with a frequency of 900 kc., 6BY is located on the radio dial between 6NA and 6PR. Local artists combined with a band and artists from Perth to provide the first programme. In his opening broadcast Sir Ross McDonald said that the first station in the company's network, which now consisted of 6IX, 6WB, 6MD and 6BY, was 6ML. When this station came on the air in 1930 there were only 4,000 listeners in this State. This number had since expanded to 143,000. Station 6IX had absorbed 6ML. When W.A. Broadcasters applied for 6WB at Katanning and 6MD at Merredin the company had been offered a power of 50 watts by day and 25 by night. Now the network's country regionals were operating with 2,000 watts and it was hoped that 6IX would be stepped up to this power shortly. Entertainment. Most of the programmes broadcast by 6IX would be relayed by 6BY. These would include three shows conducted by Mr. Jack Davey, "The Quiz Kids" and radio plays — some with Hollywood actors and actresses. Some people thought that commercial stations received part of the licence fee paid by listeners. Commercial stations did not receive any Government aid or subsidy and they paid in full for all aid received from Government departments. The station was welcomed by the Director of Posts and Telegraphs (Mr. C. G. Friend) and the vice-chairman of the Bridgetown Road Board (Mr. S. V. Wheatley). Telegrams of congratulations were received from the Postmaster-General (Mr. Anthony) and the chairman of the Australian Broadcasting Control Board (Mr. R. G. Osborne).[128]

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1985[edit]

DEATH ca 1985 Harry Simmons passed away.[129]

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The short history of the Subiaco Radio Society was written by Christine Carter (XYL of Chris VK6FC) as part of her studies at Murdoch University. Photographs and other information is being sourced. Will VK6UU. . . . A SHORT HISTORY OF THE SUBIACO RADIO SOCIETY, FROM 1923 TO 1970. C.E. CARTER, Murdoch University 30/7/85. . . . ILLUSTRATIONS: (Being sourced) . . . Figure 2. Mr Simmons' Two Valve Set. Western Wireless October 1st 1924. Foundation of the Society: The SRS was started by a few radio enthusiasts who used to gather in the backyard shack of W.R. Phipps, Rupert Street, Subiaco to discuss their hobby and latest developments. Phipps was then an electrical fitter at the Midland Railway Workshops. A public meeting was called at Saint Andrew's Hall, Barker Road, Subiaco in May 1923. Those attending were Messrs. W.R. Phipps, B. Congdon, H.T. Simmons, McKenzie, Kerr, R. Hedley, L. Thomas, W.A. Gilwhite, J. Jewell, M. Urquhart, H.T. Yeates. 14 Phipps was elected President, Congdon was Secretary and A.E. Stevens was technical adviser. 15 Shortly after its foundation, the SRS held a demonstration of "Music by Wireless and Exhibition of Radio Apparatus" in King's Hall, Subiaco in October 1923. (see figure 1) Early Members: . . . Many of the early members became prominent figures in radio in Western Australia. . . . H. T. Simmons became the chief engineer of West Australian Broadcasters. 17 Simmons was involved with radio most of his life. His first radio assignment was over sixty years ago when at short notice he was asked to join a ship sailing to the United Kingdom as Radio Officer. On board he discovered that the ship's transmitter and receiver had to be completely rebuilt. Following his return to Perth in March 1930 the first commercial broadcast station in Perth, 6ML, opened with a transmitter largely built by Harry Simmons. Other commercial stations 6IX, 6WB and 6MD were added to the network with Simmons as the Chief Engineer. Simmons' commercial work increased his interest in amateur radio and as an early member of the SRS he provided technical expertise and gave his assistance to the group of amateurs in the Society. 18 His station VK6KX was an example of what the earnest amateur could do. (see figure 2) He claimed that considerations were important: efficiency and neatness. [130]

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DEATH 6 December 1985 Elizabeth Paston Simmons formerly Roots nee Mack, 2nd wife of Harry Simmons passed away.[131]

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