History of wireless telegraphy and broadcasting in Australia/Topical/Publications/Australasian Radio World/Editorials

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Australasian Radio World - Editorials[edit]

Key article copies[edit]

Non-chronological material[edit]

1930s[edit]

1936[edit]

1936 01[edit]
1936 02[edit]
1936 03[edit]
1936 04[edit]
1936 05[edit]
1936 06[edit]
1936 07[edit]
1936 08[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

FOUR YEARS OF PROGRESS. During the past four years, radio has progressed perhaps more rapidly than ever before, particularly in regard to receiver design. 1932 saw the coming of the six- and seven-pin valves, and with their advent set designers discarded the old reliables, represented by the '24, '35, and 47, in favour of the 57, 58, and 2A5. Now these in their turn are giving way to the new American metal and English spray-shielded releases. Base standardisation for all new type valves is also an advance worthy of mention.

CIRCUIT IMPROVEMENTS. Circuit design has improved in step with, or rather, because of, advances in valve design. Diode detection, automatic volume control, noise suppression control, and then dual-wave and all-wave receivers were all made commercially practicable by valves designed specially for these features.

BETTER TONE THE NEXT STEP. The next step will undoubtedly be in the direction of improving tone; in fact, leading manufacturers are already releasing medium-priced receivers capable of giving high-quality reproduction. During the past few years, set designers have been forced to concentrate on obtaining high selectivity and maximum sensitivity - the former, because of the steady increase in the number of stations operating on the broadcast hand, and the latter, because of the rapid development of worldwide shortwave services. As a result, the modern superhet is more powerful and selective than ever before. What is now needed is these qualities combined with high-quality reproduction - a combination not easily obtained, for it means much more than just providing a modern superhet tuner with a high-class audio channel. Either variable selectivity or some form of tone compensation is needed - preferably the latter - while improved speakers and better baffling are going to help considerably. Price levels will probably be a little higher, because really good tone is expensive to obtain, but nevertheless the manufacturer who caters for this latest trend is going to reap a worthwhile reward.

1936 09[edit]
1936 10[edit]
1936 11[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

The Radio Service Industry

In step with the tremendous increase during the past few years in the number of licenses taken out annually in the Commonwealth, the radio service business has advanced to the position where it now must be recognised as a separate industry. The task of keep ng over 800,000 receivers in order is a tremendous one, that alone would make the men who perform it a force to be reckoned with, but there are other reasons why servicing as a profession is becoming increasingly more important. Of everyone in the chain between set manufacturer and buyer, the serviceman has perhaps the closest and most constant contact with the latter. Once he has obtained the confidence of his clients as a result of his experience and integrity, his recommendations regarding valve or set purchases are generally followed without question. Manu acturers who realise this can build up valuable goodwill among servicemen, and thus among listeners, simply by "servicing the serviceman" — by keeping him supplied with plenty of service data on their receivers and valves. A second reason why radio servicing is now forging ahead is that the serviceman of today must of necessity be equipped with a wide and thorough knowledge of radio from both the practical and theoretical angles. With improved methods of manufacturing, sets are being made more and more "breakdown proof," but against this they are far more complex than they were a few years ago, which means that service calls per set average little fewer today than they did before the advent of dualwave receivers, with their host of modern refinements. This increase in complexity also means that the day is well past when radio repair work can be performed by experimenters or electricians with a voltmeter, soldering iron, and a pair of pliers. Elaborate service equip ment, plus a thoroughly sound and up-to-date knowledge of radio are essentials for anyone in the service game today. The equipment needed is expensive, and the training required means years of concentrated and costly study, but for good men the opportunities offering are endless. As an established profession, radio servicing is only in its infancy.

1936 12[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

The Power Interference Problem

The main bugbear of radio reception today is power interference, and it is an annoyance that is becoming more acute with the rapid growth of shortwave listening. Also, as far as reception of Australian stations is concerned, the effects of man-made static are intensified by the comparatively low transmitting powers used. The problem is one that will have to be tackled sooner or later, even if it means the passing of legislation to compel everyone operating electrical equipment that is giving offence to fit suitable filters to silence the noise. In this respect, concerted action on the part of the tramway and power supply authorities, who are among the biggest offenders, is long overdue. In England, thousands of pounds have been spent in the past few years on research into the problem, mainly by the Electrical Research Association with the assistance of the B.B.C., the postal authorities, and the Radio Manufacturers' Association. The subject has also been exhaustively analysed by various countries on the Continent, particularly by Germany, and as a result of all this research the causes of interference are now generally understood and suitable remedies can usually be applied. In a few cases the remedy is expensive, and so further research is now being undertaken to try and find methods of achieving the desired result more cheaply. The goal that has been set in England will be attained when, by a combination of suppressing equipment at the receiver and the fitting of filters to interference-creating equipment, radio reception for 90 to 95 per cent. of the listening public will be free from man-made interference. The same goal should also be the aim of the Australian authorities, but so far next to nothing has been done. The first, simplest, and cheapest step would be to increase station power considerably, to 'provide a better signal-to-noise ratio. The next and most important move is to have legislation passed that will render owners of interfering equipment liable to prosecution. The radio inspectors appointed by the P.M.G.'s Department are already doing splendid work in quelling interference, but until they have legislative backing their task is a hopeless one.

1937[edit]

1937 01[edit]
1937 02[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

It is interesting to note that in two of the latest books on television, the authors have not only acknowledged the valuable work already done by amateurs for radio, but also they both in effect predict that the sooner amateurs are enabled to take an active part in television, the faster will this new science develop. In the foreword to his book, "Television Reception," Manfred von Ardenne, a noted German engineer and one of the world's leading authorities on television, states:— "The purpose of this publication is to provide an impulse towards intensive activity on the part of amateurs in the newest and perhaps the most interesting branch of electrical engineering." Across the Atlantic, George H. Eckhardt, in his recently-published "Electronic Television," devotes a page in his introduction to the part the amateur may be expected to play in television. He says:— "The amateur has been a pioneer in the field of radio communication. He explored wave bands that, at the time, had not been particularly useful for other purposes, and then, when other uses were found for those bands, he was forced into bands of shorter and shorter waves. He now stands on the threshold of having the ultrashort wave bands more or less snatched away from him for the advent of electronic television. "For this reason, if for no other, Philo T. Farnsworth feels that the amateur should have a part in the further development of electronic television Many of the present-day radio engineers have come from the ranks of the amateurs, and it does not seem too early to predict that electronic television will have to look to this source for many of the men who will be required in television work in the years ahead." It is certainly a wonderful tribute to amateurs when men whose names will go down through history as pioneers of television, not only commend them on the valuable work they have already done, but also invite them to co-operate in further research on television. And it is a tribute that will be particularly appreciated by the amateur, who is far more accustomed to having his efforts rewarded by restrictions being placed on his activities than to receiving commendation for them.

1937 03[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

The terrible disaster that overtook the Sydney-Brisbane airliner last month affords a tragic instance of how far Australia lags behind other countries in developing her air services. That 'planes providing a daily mail and passenger service both ways between Sydney and Brisbane, flying about 400 miles each trip over country that is subject to sudden cyclonic disturbances, do not carry the latest in two-way radio telephony equipment is difficult to understand. Actually, the Stinson that crashed did not carry radio at all. Two others flying the same route carry radio telegraphy equipment, but it is evidently unsuitable for the job. While speaking to the "Radio World" recently about the value of radio in aviation, Pilot Rex Boyden, who was in charge of the liner that was lost, remarked that in the radio-equipped Stinsons, heavy static more often than not completely obliterated signals for the greater part of the trip. Apart from the fact of not being able to receive messages, the tremendous strain that pilots must be under in trying to decipher signals and pilot the 'plane at the same time is not hard to imagine. Evidently one fault with the equipment lies in the long wavelength used; surely the short waves would provide a far better service in every way. Secondly, no pilot should be asked to divide his attentions between piloting his ship and straining to decipher code signals with static crashing in the 'phones practically all the time. Suitable equipment to provide reliable two-way communication on telephony should not be hard to develop — especially as the Stinson and Douglas air-liners in America are carrying it. Along the air routes of other countries, and especially in the States, where commercial aviation is so far developed, radio has time and again proved its worth as a saver of human lives. It is quite possible that the latest tragic air disaster in this country could have been averted if the 'plane had carried radio, and from now on no effort or expense should be soared to so equip every air-liner, and to provide the necessary radio beacons and ground stations. The cost will be heavy, but it will ensure as far as humanly possible the safety of both passengers and pilots.

1937 04[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

With the publication of this issue of the "Radio World," completing Volume 1, it is interesting to look back over the past twelve months and review the progress the paper has made in that time. The idea of a magazine designed specially to cater for set-builders, dxers, servicemen, dealers — in fact, for everyone interested in radio technically — was conceived early last year, and on May 1 the first issue saw light of of day. That such a magazine was badly needed in Australia was immediately proved beyond all doubt by the enthusiastic welcome it was given, not only by those who follow radio as a hobby, but by the trade generally as well. Letters of congratulation and appreciation soon began to pour in from all parts of the Commonwealth, and during the past eleven months the volume of mail has increased steadily until now letters are arriving at the rate of about four hundred a month. Requests for circuits and technical information, suggestions for new receivers, reports on the performance of "Radio World" sets, general amateur and DX news — almost every conceivable radio topic under the sun is covered by readers in all parts of Australia and New Zealand, in New Guinea, Fiji, and even as far afield as America. This keen widespread interest is not only very gratifying, but it also proves beyond doubt that the magazine is now thoroughly established. The "Radio World" has only one policy, and that is to give service to those it caters for. One important outcome of the enthusiastic support that has been forthcoming is that it makes possible various improvements to the magazine. Many of these have already been planned, and will gradually be put into effect as the paper progresses.

1937 05[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

In a news release recently to hand from the States, Mr. Alfred A. Ghirardi, noted radio writer, states that one important trend in radio today lies in the rapidly growing use by servicemen of the cathode ray oscillograph. Undoubtedly this new device is destined for a very important future in the radio service field. As a tool in the hand of a capable serviceman, its applications are almost endless, while just as important as its flexibility is its value as a time saver. In servicing as in any other profession, time means money, and any device that can locate faults in half an hour that otherwise might take half a day to find is a far more than worthwhile investment. According to Mr. Ghirardi, servicemen in the States are, as could be expected, using oscillographs chiefly for alignment work. However, other common uses include the measuring of capacity and inductance, testing overall receiver sensitivity and overall audio fidelity, localising audio distortion, and checking receivers for intermittent reception. Several progressive manufacturers of test equipment in this country have recently marketed oscillographs designed for service work. The price factor, often a problem with servicemen, has in one case at least been taken care of by the use of the latest type 913 1-inch cathode ray tube. This makes possible the marketing of a complete oscillograph for around £20 -a figure well within the means of most servicemen who regard the purchase of equipment of this type not as an expense, but an investment that will mean increased and more profitable business. Further trends in the radio industry that were noted by Mr. Ghirardi during a nation-wide trip include the new interest in progressive merchandising and business promotion methods by even small radio dealers, and the rapid growth of the use of public address and intercommunication systems, particularly for retail stores. Finally, Mr. Ghirardi also comments on the prevalence of parts departments in radio stores throughout the country, indicating renewed interest and activity on the part of experimenters.

1937 06[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

At the 1937 Amateur and Shortwave Radio Exhibition held in Sydney last month, the man on the street was given an opportunity of learning something of the hobby of amateur radio. Certainly the casual visitor must have been greatly impressed by the tremendous amount of time, money and ingenuity that had obviously been expended on the design and construction of most of the equipment displayed. In all, there must have been several thousands of pounds worth of home-built amateur gear on show, ranging from wavemeters and one-valve receivers to cathode ray oscillographs, elaborate transmitters and multi-valve amateur communication type superhets. Taken all round, this year's show was the most successful yet held, and the organisers are to be congratulated on their efforts. This annual radio exhibition run by and for amateurs is a comparatively new innovation. Prior to 1936, the amateur exhibition was not a separate affair at all, but comprised merely a small section of the exhibition arranged annually by the radio and electrical trades in Sydney. Last year the Council of the Wireless Institute of Australia (N.S.W. Division) decided to stage its own show, and this proved so successful that this year a decision was made to take the Lower Town Hall for the occasion. This meant a fairly heavy outlay, and so the backing of that section of the radio trade that specialises in catering for amateur requirements was sought. It was so enthusiastically given that when the show opened, nearly 40 stands were occupied, and the financial success of the venture was assured. Last year's exhibition was in the nature of a feeler to determine public and trade reaction, and with its success confirmed by that of the latest show, it is now evident that an amateur exhibition will be a regular annual event in the Sydney radio world.

1937 07[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Two cases recently reported of "gyp" radio service practices indicate the urgent need there is in this country for government licensing of servicemen. No doubt typical of thousands of similar instances, these two illustrate the necessity for protection, not only for the legitimate serviceman as well as the set-owning public, but also for reputable radio manufacturers, whose reputations must suffer considerably at the hands of the part-time "voltmeter and pliers" mechanics who attempt to service their receivers. The first case concerns a set-owner who, when asked if his receiver used an earth, replied that a serviceman had fitted one some time previously. Investigation showed there WAS an earth lead, but it was attached to the iron grating of a nearby fireplace! In the second instance, a so-called serviceman had attempted to repair a defective wet electrolytic by filling it with water. Both cases seem so ridiculous that it is difficult to believe them true, but they are vouched for by the serviceman subsequently called in by the set-owners concerned. As well, they are not isolated instances; no doubt every serviceman practising anywhere in Australia to-day could recall similar experiences. To-day, anyone knowing the difference between a resistor and condenser, and finding himself out of a job, can hang out a shingle and become a radio serviceman. Whether he stays in business long or not is beside the point; while he IS in he can do the servicing profession a tremendous amount of harm. And servicing IS a profession; one that needs years of specialised training and constant study if it is to be followed successfully. In New Zealand to-day, the "gyp" serviceman is rapidly being forced out of business by the licensing system adopted some years ago. The electrical regulations as applied to radio have been tightened up considerably, so that now a salesman not holding a service ticket is not even permitted, under penalty of heavy fine, to change a power plug. And with the serviceman's licence came the serviceman's award. Today the award wage, which has been steadily mounting during the past few years, stands at £5/16/- per week. No further arguments should be needed to convince servicemen in this country that, in both their own interests and those of the public they serve, licensing is urgently needed.

1937 08[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

The unexpected death of Marchese Marconi on July 20 last came as a tragic surprise to the whole world. As the man who pioneered radio as we know it to-day, Marconi has done incalculable good for humanity, and the gigantic network of broadcasting stations and radio communications systems that covers the globe to-day will form an everlasting monument to his memory. A brilliant thinker, Marconi was at the same time far more than a man of exceptional scholastic attainments. A visionary, he had as well the ability to apply his ideas in practical form, and in this combination of the theoretical and practical lay his genius. One of Marconi's early associates and lifelong friend was Sir Ernest Fisk, chairman of directors of Amalgamated Wireless (A/sia) Ltd., who, speaking from London by radio telephone the day following Marconi's death, paid the following tribute to the great inventor's memory:- "By the death of Marconi the world has lost one of the most illustrious figures and one of the greatest benefactors of our generation. I have also lost a beloved friend and leader of many years' standing. "It is astonishing to contemplate the enormous range of human activity in which Marconi's work has become applied during his lifetime, and perhaps even more remarkable to consider the fruits yet to be gathered from the great science and industry pioneered by Marconi. He was a great scientific visionary, who always saw ahead the possibilities and the means for developing beneficially the use of electro-magnetic waves in the ether. First to protect human life and property at sea and to overcome the isolation previously associated with seafaring life, he then attempted, in the face of scientific opposition, to span the oceans, and succeeded magnificently, and later he caused his waves of intelligence and goodwill to cover the great distance between the Old Country and Australia and then to encircle the world. "He discovered the principles which enable thousands of wireless stations to work simultaneously without mutual interference, and then proceeded to develop that most efficient system known as the Wireless Beam, by which we can send electromagnetic waves in any direction we choose. "In more recent years Marconi applied his research in the field of those ultra short waves which will eventually make television practicable, and in the new field of microwaves, the enormous possibilities of which will be demonstrated in years to come. "He was a modest gentleman who always recognised that as his work developed it required and utilised the co-operation of innumerable other inventors and scientists who were attracted by the beacon light which he carried forward. "Although born an Italian, and remaining constantly loyal to his native country, Marconi became essentially an international figure and world possession. His great achievements were recognized by Governments and scientific bodies and endorsed by many decorations granted to him in the principal countries of the world. "The British people will always recognize the debt of gratitude to Marconi for his great work, which has enabled all parts of our widespread Empire to be linked with means for instantaneous communication. They are proud of the fact that Marconi's mother was British, and that most of his early experimental work was carried out in Great Britain by the British Company which he established. Direct communication between Australia and Great Britain is an outstanding result of Marconi's work -as also is the linking by wireless of half a million telephone subscribers in Australia with more than thirty million telephone subscribers of the outside world. Our broadcasting stations, which convey information and entertainment to every home in the country - no matter how near or remote - constitute a further tribute to this great man. In the Navy, in the Mercantile Marine, in the Commercial and Defence Air Services, in the vast interchange of commodities known as international trade, and in the transmission to hundreds of millions of people of news and information through broadcasting, and in the new field of the use of wireless waves for healing purposes, in the saving of life, and in spreading understanding among the peoples of the world, Marconi lived to see the fruits of his great faith and imagination, his wide knowledge, and his untiring work. "The newspapers of Great Britain to-day are unanimous in paying tribute to the most outstanding man of our time. "As President of the Institution of Radio Engineers of Australia, and on behalf of its Council, I had invited Marconi to attend our World Radio Convention in Australia next year, and he had enthusiastically accepted. Only a few days ago I received a telegram from him inviting me to go to Rome to discuss this and other matters of mutual interest."

1937 09[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1937 10[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1937 11[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1937 12[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1938[edit]

1938 01[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1938 02[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1938 03[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1938 04[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1938 05[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1938 06[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1938 07[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1938 08[edit]

Unknown, issue not yet sighted

1938 09[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1938 10[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1938 11[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1938 12[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1939[edit]

1939 01[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1939 02[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1939 03[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1939 04[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1939 05[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Our Third Birthday WITH this month’s issue the "Australasian Radio World" celebrates its third birthday, and commences its fourth year of service to readers. Prior to May, 1936, when the first issue of "Radio World" came off the press, there did not exist a locally-produced magazine serving the general technical radio field in Australia. That there was a real need for such a paper was soon evidenced by the enthusiastic support accorded the first issue of "Radio World" by those it was intended to serve. Within a week of publication letters of appreciation started to pour in from all parts of the Commonwealth — they have been coming in steadily ever since, to such an extent that in the past three years several thousand must have come to hand. With such a reception, the paper could not help going ahead, until to-day it is fully established, with a Commonwealth-wide network of readers, all with a keen interest, professional or amateur, in the technical side of radio. COMMENCING with this issue the magazine is to be thoroughly overhauled, and many new features added to give readers the best possible service. This month there is a new cover design, new type, and the magazine is printed on heavier, more expensive paper. The content is under consideration as well, and the scope of the magazine is to be widened to cater for the varied interests of those whose acquaintance with radio extends beyond the tuning controls. While widely differing classes of readers are to be catered for, it is felt that all have one thing in common, and that is a deep and abiding enthusiasm for all things technical in radio. LASTLY, a word of appreciation is due to the trade for its consistent support of the magazine during the past three years. Such support is a real tribute to the vital service the "Radio World" is giving, and proves its worth as one of the finest advertising mediums available in the technical radio field in Australia. For the future, both readers and advertisers can rest assured that the "Radio World" policy of "service first and always" will be just as rigidly maintained as it has been in the past.

1939 06[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1939 07[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1939 08[edit]

No separate issue, previous month was "July-August"

1939 09[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1939 10[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1939 11[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1939 12[edit]

"Radio World" Change of Address

Readers are asked to note that, early in December, "Radio World" headquarters will be shifted to a building now being erected for the Bridge Printery Pty. Ltd., at 117 Reservoir Street (off Elizabeth St., near Central Railway Station). As from December 11, all correspondence should be addressed as follows: "Australasian Radio World," 117 Reservoir Street, Sydney, N.S.W. The new "Radio World" telephone number - FL2842 - appears in the current directory.

1940s[edit]

1940[edit]

1940 01[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1940 02[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Nil

1940 03[edit]

A PERSONAL MESSAGE.

With due apology for the too abundant use of the word "I". I cannot express how happy I am at the prospect of again devoting all my energy to technical radio matters. During the past two years I have had to deal with the prosaic matters of business, of broadcasting programmes, publicity and the like. Now I am right back in the thick of the technicalities which I love. From now on my days and nights will be spent fiddling around with novel circuits, new valves, powerful amplifiers and the rest of the things which mean so much to me. What is more to the point there will be less restriction for my only thoughts need be to please those whose heart beats as mine. No need to consider the masses, no fear that I will have to please people to whom a circuit is like Chinese. Before I go further I feel that I should express the satisfaction I feel in carrying on a technical policy of which anyone might well be proud. In the past the Australasian Radio World has held my esteem for the soundness of its articles, the accuracy of its circuits and the general way in which the magazine has been conducted. I feel that only a few minor details need attention to make the paper worthy to maintain its rightful place as Australia's only one hundred per cent. technical radio journal. Among these changes I might mention the addition of a Junior Technical section, to be conducted by Alf. Barnes, whose articles have been a feature of "Wireless Weekly" for the past couple of years. Another feature to be strengthened is the query service. Readers should be assured of prompt and effective handling of their letters, with replies either free of charge in the columns of our pages, or by mail on payment of a small fee. Several other minor improvements should be noted during the next couple of months and I am sure that they will be duly appreciated. No startling changes in style are contemplated, and the services of Earl Read, who has made the paper what it is today are being retained as Associate Editor. A. G. Hull

1940 04[edit]

Editorial

First of all I want to thank you all for the wonderful reception you have given me and the effective help. Apparently hundreds of my friends, whom I have never had the pleasure of meeting, have shown themselves to be true friends by spreading the news, and it has travelled far and wide at great speed. One big result has been a tremendous increase in my mail and 'phone calls and what with trying to get out a bigger and better issue, and catch up with my correspondence, I have put in the busiest month I can ever remember. It has been good fun, of course, because it has been so successful. I don't think anybody minds working hard when they can easily see that they are progressing. Particularly gratifying has been the response to our offer of a technical query service by return mail, and to our offer of laboratory service, although both of these have added greatly to the amount of work to be done. Additional staff has been obtained, however, and from now on we should have little difficulty in keeping abreast of the work involved. It is with regret that I have to announce that a change has been found unavoidable in connection with our short-wave review. Mr. Alan Graham, who has conducted this section in such fine manner for some time has gone into camp and so will not be able to contribute these notes for future issues. My luck holds, however, and I consider that I have been most fortunate in being able to obtain Mr. L. J. Keast to carry on the work. Mr. Keast has been a prominent short-wave listener for years and a keen contributor to leading journals. We feel sure that Mr. Keast will carry on the short-wave review in grand style. Speaking of changes, you will notice a couple of new features in this issue, a page for letters to the editor, and a Hints and Tips page, contributed by Walter G . Nichols, one of radio's pioneer experimenters, a fine artist and a man with a keen appreciation of the finer points of radio theory and practice. Work in connection with the amplifier championship is way ahead of me at the moment as I have been so busy with other things. Keen interest has been shown however, and that is what matters most. Already I have hod several entries and bookings for seats, also applications for positions on the judging staff, and on the organising committee. These things should be straightened out in the course of the next few days, so if you have anything you want to say about the contest I'd appreciate a letter immediately. It's your contest and I want you to see that you get your share of the work, interest, and enjoyment. — A. G. HULL

1940 05[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Things are booming along at a great pace. For the April issue we printed just twice as many copies as were sold of the February issue, but within a week we found ourselves completely out of stock and we had to disappoint hundreds who wrote in from every part of Australia trying to obtain a copy of this issue. Actually there is a chance that some copies will be returned from newsagents in outlying districts, and if any such copies become available those who have placed orders for them can rest assured that the orders will be filled in rotation as soon as possible. Organization for the Amplifier Championship is also getting ahead at a fast pace, and already prizes to the value of over £80 have been donated, and it seems that the final prize list will total well over £100. Readers are warned, however, that we move at a rapid pace when we get started and therefore it is essential for everyone interested to write now and book seats for the auditions, or place their entry, as the case may be. We know that it takes a bit of an effort to look out some paper and a pen, and then the ink, find the stamp and get the letter posted, but if you don't want to get left out of this extremely interesting contest you'll have to take a grab of yourself by the back of the collar and get moving! Owners of comparatively simple amplifiers will be pleased to know that they are not only eligible to compete, but that they stand a good chance of collecting some of the excellent prizes which have been allotted for amplifiers using not more than three valves in all, including the rectifier. There is no entry fee of any kind and the whole contest is being conducted solely in the interests of enthusiasts, so be sure you get your share of the fun. Already the contest has stirred up keen interest, and as a result the two major speaker companies are hard at work on the job of producing reproducer equipments capable of giving phenomenal fidelity at a price within the reach of the average enthusiast. We draw special attention to the details of these assemblies, as covered in the two articles in the special amplifier section. A. G. HULL

1940 06[edit]

Editorial Notes . . .

Should an Editor tell? Should an Editor admit the mistakes which always seem to happen in circuit diagrams and wiring layouts, no matter how doubly they are checked and re-checked? When the mistake is noticed should the Editor lie low, say nothing and hope that the majority of his readers have not noticed the mistake, and retain their impression that the diagrams are always one hundred per cent, perfect? Or should the error be noted in the following issue so that those who are in trouble will see the correction and solve their problem without further worry? Judging by technical journals from all over the world there seems to be a definite hesitancy about the admission of errors, but we feel that our readers are of a standard much higher than the average intelligence, and we don't think that they are going to consider our technical articles completely unreliable just because an occasional slip happens. Just how these slips do occur is fairly easy to explain, when the normal procedure is considered. First the design of the set is considered, and a rough circuit drawn up. From this rough circuit two copies are made, one for the man building up the chassis and the other for the artist who is draughting the final circuit schematic. When the set is being built and tested there are often minor changes made necessary to allow parts on hand to be used, or to cure unforeseen troubles which arise when the chassis is being given a thorough test on the air. When the chassis has been finally passed as O.K. it goes to the artist who draughts the picture diagrams from it. Later the diagrams are checked and re-checked, but every now and then there is an error or a substitution drawn into the diagrams which is not discovered. In most cases it is merely a matter of two alternative values being given, both equally suitable in practice and either value can be used without affecting results in any way. But they are different, and to the average set-builder such substitutions are confusing and worrying. We fully appreciate how well off we would be without them. But if they do happen then we feel that it is up to us to admit them in the next issue, even if the majority of other technical journals are not so candid with their readers. A. G. HULL

1940 07[edit]

EDITORIAL . . .

Life has been brighter this month. The office has assumed a new air of happiness. The reason — our new mantel model, "Tip Top", has been playing in the office, as you'll notice by the photograph at the top of the opposite page. We've heard a lot about the need for auxiliary receivers in the home, and we've always made a point of having two or three sets available. But we never thought that one could prove such a boon in the office. With extraordinary performance, considering its simplicity and I cost, "Tip Top" has been providing a background of soft music which has changed the whole atmosphere of the working day. It makes us feel sure that this little set is bound to find favour with our readers, too. You'll be bound to find a good use for it. Not so bright, however, is the paper position. Every month it becomes harder and harder to obtain supplies of the kind of smooth-finish paper which we have used in the past, and, of course, costs have risen considerably. We feel sure that our readers appreciate decent paper and clean printing, so our problem at the moment is to know how to give you all you want without using too much paper. The solution rests with you. If you can spare a moment we'd greatly appreciate it if you will give us an idea of what type of reading matter suits you best. For example, there is the short-wave section. In one way it is difficult to justify its inclusion in a paper with a policy of "100% Technical Radio", and yet we feel that it is the most accurate and authentic guide of its kind, and that it serves a valuable purpose to the keen radio man. Do you appreciate it, or would you rather have more articles about battery set design? Let us know how you feel about such matters and we'll do what we can to fulfil your requirements. In conclusion we would like to again draw your attention to the Amplifier Championship. This contest is proving a wonderful success in spite of the difficult times through which we are passing. Our greatest care in regard to the Amplifier Championship is that there must be many readers who would find the auditions of boundless interest, yet have not managed to find sufficient energy to fill in the application form for a seat reservation. Of course many have done so, and already more than a hundred have been along to the first three heats, but there must be hundreds more who don't know what they are missing. Action is called for. A. G. HULL

1940 08[edit]

PERSONAL

As you open up this month's issue, you will notice that there has been a drastic change in the make-up of the pages. The actual size of each page has been cut down quite a bit. We doubt if it is in any way an improvement, but it is made necessary by the need for conserving stocks of paper, thereby indirectly saving the dollar exchange, thus to allow the purchase of American aeroplanes for the War effort. Regulations have been introduced with a view to cutting down the amount of paper used by about 35%. From a glance at the regulations, it is not clear whether the actual number of pages has to be cut down or whether the saving can be made by any other method which will allow the best possible production to be made without using more than 65% of the paper used previously. We have gone into the matter carefully and we feel sure that the best possible way we could cut would be to cut down the margins, spaces between columns and so on, thereby allowing us to continue to give as much technical information as possible. And so we have this new style, which may not be artistic, but we feel sure that our readers will appreciate that the paper saving is being made and yet the editorial content is being retained, together with the good quality paper which allows the circuits to be reproduced clearly and the photographs to be printed in a way which makes it possible for the experimenter to see just how the original sets were built. Even if the way we have made the saving does not fulfill the requirements of the regulations to the letter, we have an easy conscience, as we feel that we have "done our bit" in making the saving. We also feel fairly safe in the thought that the authorities must surely recognize that a technical journal, devoted to improving the public's knowledge of radio communication, is a little different to a magazine devoted to the publication of doubtful jokes, or love stories. Actually the regulations do not come into force until the next issue, but if the saving of paper is important we felt that we should start immediately. Before the next issue is brought out there may be alterations or amendments to the regulations, but readers can rest assured that, even if we have to save paper, we will maintain our editorial policy to the best of our ability. A. G. H U LL.

1940 09[edit]

PERSONAL

The Grand Final of the Amplifier Championship was a great success. We had a night of splendid reproduction, which will long be remembered by the one hundred and fourteen enthusiasts who were present. It is also unlikely to be forgotten by the ten competitors and their assistants who carried the heavy amplifiers up the stairs to the second floor. The whole contest was a wonderful success in every way, notwithstanding the number of entrants who were unable to compete on account of German Measles. A number of entrants, also, had to withdraw as they had "joined up". Let us hope that by the time the Amplifier Championship for 1941 is being held we will all be able to give the contest undivided attention. In the meantime, however, everything possible has to be done to assist the National Effort. The big problem is to keep the production up to standard and yet comply with the Regulations governing the amount of paper which can be used. Incidentally, a number of readers have written to suggest that we should use cheaper paper, and more of it. As it happens, the Regulations do not deal with the quality of paper used, and even if we used the cheapest paper procurable we would still have to limit the number of papers to our present standard. Fortunately, the scheme for cutting down the amount of paper in each issue, by column rules and narrow margins, has been a great success. Without exception, reports indicate that readers prefer the new size and layout. Apparently the remarks I made last month were far too pessimistic. The paper regulations take into account increases in circulation, which is most fortunate, as we have enjoyed a vast demand in the past three months. Stories get around that the shortage of issues has been due to paper shortage, but this is not strictly the truth. Every month for several months past we have increased the actual number printed, but we have not been able to accurately judge the demand. For this issue, however, we have made quite sure by putting through a record number of copies and there should be ample to fill the demand. A. G. HULL.

1940 10[edit]

PERSONAL

Running a technical radio monthly if a happy job. It is such a friendly business from start to finish that it is hard to call it work. Of course, to a certain extent, it is a matter of birds of a feather flocking together. Being such a keen experimenter myself I find it a most interesting pastime to tinker about in my own laboratory and so I am well able to understand the enthusiasm of readers who have similar feelings and who like to tinker about with circuits and sets in the same way. Another welcome feature of the life is the mail. Every day there is a bundle of letters from readers who tell of what they are doing, of how they are getting along with the various jobs they are working on. Often they give suggestions for articles. These suggestions are invaluable. A good example of the assistance of these suggestions is shown in this month's issue. There are two articles which we feel sure are going to be of much interest and help to our readers, one dealing with grid current in converter valves and the other dealing with the difference in various intermediate transformers. I doubt if there is a hundred to one chance that I would have thought up the subject matter of these articles if they had not been suggested by readers. All readers, no matter whether advanced experimenters or just novices, are cordially invited to write to me. It is not always possible for me to answer each letter individually, and often enough I am so busy that I have to put aside the mail for three or four days before I get time to read every letter carefully. If, by any chance, you have written to me, but haven't received a reply, I do hope that you won't think that I am not interested or that I don't appreciate your kindness. I am pleased to notice that many readers have not forgotten Earl Read, who was formerly editor. Unfortunately Earl's name does not often appear at the heading of articles these days, as he is devoting practically all his time and energy to the business side of the paper. Earl, however, is still keenly interested, and often takes a few minutes off to peek at the mail and keep in touch with the activities of the members of the DX Club and of other readers. A. G. HULL.

1940 11[edit]

PERSONAL

In step with the tremendous increase during the past few years in the number of licenses taken out annually in the Commonwealth, the radio service business has advanced to the position where it now must be recognised as a separate industry. The task of keeping over a million receivers in order is a tremendous one; that alone would make the men who perform it a force to be reckoned with, but there are other reasons why servicing as a profession is becoming increasingly more important. Of every one in the chain between set manufacturer and buyer, the serviceman has perhaps the closest and most constant contact with the latter. Once he has obtained the confidence of his clients as a result of his experience and integrity, his recommendations regarding valve or set purchases are generally followed without question. Manufacturers who realise this can build up valuable goodwill among servicemen, and thus among listeners, simply by "servicing the serviceman" — by keeping him supplied with plenty of service data on their receivers and valves. A second reason why radio servicing is now forging ahead is that the serviceman of to-day must of necessity be equipped with a wide and thorough knowledge of radio from both the practical and theoretical angles. With improved methods of manufacturing, sets are being made more and more "breakdown proof," but against this they are far more complex than they were a few years ago, which means that service calls per set average little fewer to-day than they did before the advent of dual-wave receivers, with their host of modern refinements. This increase in complexity also means that the day is well past when radio repair work can be performed by experimenters or electricians with a voltmeter, soldering iron, and a pair of pliers. Elaborate service equipment, plus a thoroughly sound and up-to-date knowledge of radio are essentials for anyone in the service game to-day. The equipment needed is expensive, and the training required means years of concentrated and costly study, but for good men the opportunities offering are endless. As an established profession, radio servicinq is only in its infancy. A. G. HULL.

1940 12[edit]

PERSONAL

Under the rationing regulations which control the amount of paper we are permitted to use in this production, it appeared most unlikely that we would be able to offer anything in the way of a bumper Christmas issue. Yet we felt that something should be done to produce a special issue which would express the appreciation we feel for the splendid support which readers have given us during the year. Not to be outdone in this resolve we have therefore cut down on this issue to a minimum, getting in as much technical matter as on hand, but squeezing it in to 36 pages. This saving in paper will allow us to carry out the idea of the special Christmas issue, and it should be on sale about a week before the holidays. In this special issue we hope to be able to have at least sixty pages (although we'll have to weigh up on our quota to make sure). In these sixty pages we hope to have some very special articles, including full details of two more championship amplifiers, the rest of the picture diagrams and photos covering the construction of the portable set which is announced in this issue, and also several completely new technical articles. It may seem a little like robbing Peter to pay Paul, but we can only ask your tolerance. Things aren't what they used to be. Which thought brings to mind that if we understand the budget proposals correctly there will be quite an incentive to radio set building, as complete sets carry the 15% sales tax, whilst radio component parts are taxed at only 10%. Why radio sets should be classed as luxuries, and put in the 15% class seems a little hard to understand, as in most homes a radio set is just as much a necessity as the clock on the mantelpiece or the newspaper on the table. However these things come to us, wrapped up in a story of national effort, so that none of us feel any other sentiment than that we have to endure them as best we can. The main thing being to "do your bit" and "carry on." A. G. HULL.

1941[edit]

1941 01[edit]

PERSONAL

Rapidly drawing to a close, the year 1940 has been full of interest to me. Cutting adrift from the "old firm" after ten years, it was a big step to take over the "World," especially in such troublous times. Fortunately, the venture has been a grand success, and with the valuable assistance of Earl Read, have been able to make a lot of progress. With the New Year looming up, however, thoughts turn to New Year resolutions. To stand still is to go backwards, and so we have in mind several ideas which we expect to improve the style of the paper. Maybe a few of these will share the usual fate of New Year resolutions, but let us hope that some of them will be found practical. Day by day, it seems to be indicated more clearly that deeper and deeper technical articles will be required to satisfy the demand from radio engineers, servicemen and enthusiasts who are all progressing at a fast rate. A couple of years ago, our readers were interested in articles on how to use a multi-meter, then they became interested in using oscillators, then valve and circuit testers. It looks as though, in the New Year, they will be interested in cathode ray oscilloscopes, having already obtained and mastered the simpler test equipment. Advertising is likely to follow a similar trend, as most of our readers already possess the simpler types of receivers and test equipment. They are now interested in more advanced circuit designs and in more advanced test equipment. We feel that, in this progress, we must set the pace, and so that is one of our modest (?) New Year resolutions. Another resolution is to go into the matter of posting out all copies in flat envelopes instead of rolling or folding. We know that it is much nicer to open up a magazine after it has been posted flat, and the only real drawback to the scheme is the cost of the necessary envelopes. As is to be expected in the highly specialised field we cover, our direct subscribers are a big proportion of our total circulation and the bill for the envelopes, even at less than a half-penny each, would be quite beyond us. It seems, therefore, that an extra charge of 6d. per annum will be necessary for this special posting service. A. G. HULL.

1941 02[edit]

PERSONAL

As regards the number of pages, this issue is not up to our standard, due mainly to the holiday season spreading over into the New Year. Paper rationing makes it impossible for us to waste paper, so we have cut down on this issue. By doing so we allow ourselves ample paper for a bumper March issue. Several feature articles have not been quite ready for this February issue and have been held over. The March "Radio World" should be easily the biggest and best issue ever produced. Getting back to this February issue, however, the quality of the editorial matter should go a long way towards making up for the lack of quantity. Our feature article, dealing with every aspect of circuits to provide compensated acoustics, is surely one of the finest and most comprehensive technical articles ever published in Australia. The many factors involved are covered by an engineer who really knows his subject. We make no apology for the length of this article, for we feel sure that it contains valuable information which will be appreciated by all radio designers and enthusiasts. A. G. HULL

1941 03[edit]

PERSONAL

From the papers we learn of the terrible bombing of London; in the news reels we see the awful destruction of the incendiaries; we get an impression of complete ruin and utter desolation. But then, we are fortunate enough to get hold of a copy of an English technical radio monthly, such as the "Wireless World", and it all seems so incredible. We feel that we must pay tribute to this publication, which is maintaining a high standard in spite of the difficulties which abound. That technicians in England should spend their time worrying out the theoretical effects of inverse feedback applications to quiescent push-pull circuits is a certain indication that, in spite of everything, England carries on. The latest issue of "Wireless World" carries a strong support of advertising, and, strangely enough, little of it deals directly, or even indirectly, with war activity. Perhaps it carries a lesson to us in Australia. Australia is playing a big part in this war. Australian troops are participating in spectacular victories abroad. Not so spectacular, but equally effective, is the home effort of the Australian factories, which are really producing war materials. Not all of us can take an active part in either of these activities, and it is plain that our duty is to conserve the normal business and economic life. All of which is an introduction to express our policy of maintaining our editorial standard. We are most fortunate in having the fullest support of our advertisers and as you will notice from this issue, there is no shortage of up-and-coming ideas for technical articles. Our only difficulty is in regard to paper supplies. At the worst, a further shortage may mean that copies will be available only to subscribers and those who have placed regular orders. Already about 90 per cent. of our circulation is ordered in this way, and the effect would be merely to eliminate the wastage of copies which have to lie about on counters on the off-chance of meeting the eye of someone interested in technical radio. Fortunately the "Radio World" has been established for many years and there are few radio enthusiasts who do not appreciate its regular monthly appearance without having to be reminded of the fact. This statement, by the way, is not a reply to those of our readers who have asked us why we have discontinued our own advertising in "Radio and Hobbies". The position is simply that Associated Newspapers refuse to accept it. A. G. HULL

1941 04[edit]

Issue not yet sighted

1941 05[edit]

PERSONAL

This issue should really be a special birthday issue, as it is just five years since that sunny day in May of 1936 when the first issue of the "Australasian Radio World" appeared. Instead of putting our quota of paper to the glorification of the success which has been achieved, we offer something a lot more practical. It takes the shape of a special section for servicemen. We feel, however, that the occasion does call for a little praise for those who have guided the destiny of the paper. Tribute must be paid to the policy which has been so steadfastly maintained. Suggestions for obtaining wider circulation by the introduction of extraneous articles of a "popular" nature have been repeatedly declined. Success is the practical proof that the radio trade and those interested in technical radio are pleased to maintain a magazine devoted exclusively to their interests. Owing to this somewhat restricted editorial policy, it has taken time to attain our present circulation, but we are now quite confident that we have a complete coverage of radio enthusiasts, set-builders, factory technicians, country dealers and in fact all those interested in the technical side of radio throughout the whole of Australasia. We also find that our Short-wave Section has a strong following among keen listeners who want authentic information. The number of copies being posted to various consulates and to foreign countries is indicative of the good work done by the original short-wave editor, Alan Graham, who is now abroad with the A.I.F., and our present short-wave editor, L. J. Keast. It is interesting to note that in strong contrast to the advanced technical features in this issue, we also offer on article on a two-valve headphone set which is based on the design of a similar receiver which was featured in our original issue of May, 1936. A. G. HULL

1941 06[edit]

Editorial Notes

Nil

1941 07[edit]

Editorial Notes

Nil

1941 08[edit]

Dit d' d' dah!

It is significant that the morse code sign for "V" is figuring so prominently in the Victory Campaign. When the full history of this war is written, it will be revealed that the assistance of radio and aviation has been vital. It is fairly obvious that the Victory Campaign has been nicely timed, as we are undoubtedly around the corner now, and victorious peace may be with us again at any day now. Let us hope that the two sciences will never again have the restrictions of officialdom which have hampered their progress in the past. Let us hope that the rising generation will be afforded every assistance to enjoy both radio and aviation as scientific hobbies. Never let us forget that "The Price of Peace Is Eternal Vigilance."

1941 09[edit]

Editorial

Every now and then there is a tendency to get an impression that radio development has reached its climax, that every avenue of application has now been explored. Just in case you feel that way we would like to tell you about a book recently received from overseas. It deals with some new ideas about the use of ultra high-frequency radiations. It mentions such things as special valves with positive potentials on the grids and negative potentials on the plates, just to get the electrons mixed up so that the valves will oscillate without regeneration. Like a fairy story read the chapters about radio transmission from lenses made of ebonite, instead of aerials. Further details cannot be revealed at the moment, but you can take it for granted that when peace returns the wartime research will be found to have paved the way for radio development on a scale never before imagined.

1941 10[edit]

Editorial

You may be a good radio engineer, but can you prove it? Recently there has been a strong call for radio engineers to serve their country in connection with the construction and maintenance of radio location equipment. Wonderful scope is offered, together with quite good pay and excellent conditions, apart from the patriotic appeal. Many of our readers have responded and are now on the job, but one or two have found to their amazement that they have not been able to prove their ability. Although thoroughly capable on the practical side they have not possessed any university degrees or diplomas. When faced with a qualifying examination they have not been able to fully reveal their ability, and wish that they had taken the precaution of associating themselves with an organisation of some kind, such as a radio college, technical school or that worthy organisation, the Institution of Radio Engineers.

1941 11[edit]

Editorial

It is abundantly clear that our Battery Circuit Contest is going to be remarkably successful. It has created considerable interest in many country towns and provided a topic for conversation in most factories, according to reports from our readers. Country dealers appreciate the value of the publicity angle of having their views published and, from our point of view, we don't begrudge them this free advertising, so long as it is all for a good cause. What better cause could you imagine than helping the country man to get better performance from his set? The candid expression of opinions by country men, who are on the spot obtaining practical experience, must be a big factor in assisting in this direction. From our own point of view, we are especially delighted, as we have in hand a stock of editorial matter which should make the next half-dozen issues of infinite interest to all country readers.

1941 12[edit]

Editorial

Christmas is here again! This is our Christmas issue. Unfortunately, we are not able to make it a bumper issue, as we might have done under normal conditions. In fact, we feel quite happy and satisfied with being able to maintain our present standard in the face of the dozen and one little problems which arise at times like this. Looking back over the year, too, we find plenty to be happy about. The success of Parry's articles on acoustic compensation, the popularity of the special features for dealers, and particularly those on signal tracing, are all reflected in a substantial increase in circulation. Since our ration of paper has to cover this increased circulation, we find that we can't have as many pages in each issue as we could readily fill, but we are doing the best we can under the circumstances. It gives us great satisfaction to know that our readers appreciate the difficulties and maintain their loyal support, and so it is with the fullest sincerity that we wish you all — A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

1942[edit]

1942 01[edit]

Editorial

The arrival of a recent mail has again emphasised the amazing way in which the English "can take it." Notwithstanding the difficult conditions which must prevail on account of the incessant bombings, the radio press is still performing its work of national importance by disseminating technical information. In London the good old "Wireless World" carries on in grand style, strongly supported by the leading advertisers. In their latest issue we notice nearly all the famous brand names amongst the twenty-two pages of advertising. Fortunately, our position in Australia is infinitely safer than in Britain, although our radio business has its trading difficulties. It is encouraging to notice that these difficulties are being faced in true Digger spirit and with a long-range outlook to the wide span of years which lies beyond our immediate task of dealing with the present disturbers of the peace. In the meantime, we radio men will need to show the keenest initiative to keep our million and a half radio receivers in good operating condition.

1942 02[edit]

Editorial

Owing to difficult trading conditions - most radio lines being easier to sell than to buy - there is a falling off in advertising, thus allowing more space to be devoted to reading matter. Scarcity of paper, however, tends to offset this gain, and so we find ourselves this month with an issue which contains only a small number of pages, a few scattered advertisements, but a full complement of technical matter which will give some idea of the way in which "Australasian Radio World" will face up to changed conditions. Space being so much at a premium, we are unable to go over the fundamentals thoroughly in each issue, but we do keep a stock of back numbers so that these may be referred to for such matters. We find that these back numbers are in keen demand, and the success of our recent special offer of a set of a dozen for 5/- prompts us to make another special offer. This time we are prepared to supply, post free, a complete set of the 1941 issues to every reader taking out a subscription for 1942. Only a limited number of sets are available and so an early application is essential.

1942 03[edit]

Editorial

At the moment of writing, the future, to put it mildly, is obscure. Nobody can possibly imagine that the prospects are rosy, and so I have been doubly pleased to find that my readers have expressed their confidence in me so positively by renewing subscriptions. At the moment our list of direct subscribers is the highest it has ever been in the history of the publication. New subscriptions have come along steadily during the past month and quite a considerable proportion of these have taken advantage of the special offer of £1 for two years! Such expressions of confidence have spurred me to make every effort to safeguard the future. Precautions have been taken, and even a direct hit on the office by a 500-lb. bomb will not stop the old "Radio World" from coming out on time every month. But I feel that it is up to me to do my bit for the national effort, and so I am at present engaged on a matter directly connected with the war effort. This means the temporary suspension of the laboratory service, and may mean delays in the queries service, but I am sure that readers will appreciate the difficulties of the moment. V for Victory! A. G. HULL.

1942 04[edit]

Editorial

Pioneers often hove a tough time of it before their work receives proper recognition. John Bristoe, author of our series of articles on signal tracers, might be considered a pioneer, and accordingly his articles hove not been accepted by all our readers. Quite a few hove their doubts about the value and efficiency of the signal tracer, and the subject is a fertile one for arguments. Frankly, we hove not hod much experience with them in our own laboratory, but there are two factors which influence us to put our backing behind Mr. Bristoe. Firstly, we know that Mr. Bristoe is a practical man, in charge of a radio deportment, handling hundreds of sets, and, secondly, we note that those who doubt the value of the signal tracer are mostly those who have not actually tried them in practice. They base their opinions on theoretical considerations, which ore not, to our way of thinking, sufficient in themselves in a case like this. To those in doubt we can only suggest that a little practical work with one or another of the signal tracer outfits will soon convince them that they are well worthwhile for those who hove a volume of servicing work to handle.

1942 05[edit]

Editorial

The recent increases in sales tax on radio parts appear to place most unfortunate load on an industry which is already carrying more than a fair share of the war's unavoidable burdens. The possibility of a long war makes it desirable to think of the rising lads who will be swelling the ranks of the air crews and the signals section in a year or two. Steps are being taken to train them for service in the R.A.A.F. by that most worthy effort, the Air Training Service. Yet, so far as we know, there is nothing being done to encourage youngsters to study the practice of radio communication, in fact they are being discouraged. The heavier sales tax makes it difficult for them to afford to buy the necessary parts with which to experiment. Even so, we can readily imagine what a rush there would be from modern lads if they were given the opportunity to enlist in a radio training corps with permission to build, erect and operate their own transmitting and receiving centres. Even whilst training they could be put to good use for N.E.S. and other emergency work. Yet we hesitate to push the suggestion for already there seems to be enough talking and wrangling; enough man-power spent at the income tax office to put up a good war effort if only directed at some better purpose than struggling for a tupenny-ha'penny refund. And so we appeal to the radio enthusiasts and the radio trade to bear the burden of increased sales tax as best they can, accepting it as part of their war effort.

1942 06[edit]

Editorial

There is plenty of important work for every man in Australia who hos any knowledge of technical radio. The spheres of war are now so close that the big bombers come home to roost, often with their radio equipment riddled with bullets. Repairs must be made immediately, as we cannot afford to have any bombers idle. What splendid work for the radio repair man. Not so spectacular, yet mighty important, however, is the maintenance of the modest home receiver. Through it comes the news and the propaganda which forges the national spirit, the will to win and right angle from which to view the set-backs and disasters which a're inevitable, even when winning. If there were no radio broadcasting or newspapers there would be only rumour to spread such news. Yes, every radio receiver in Australia, and there are over a million and a half of them, must be kept in perfect condition, especially since the manufacture of new receivers is restricted. The job of keeping the sets in good operating condition calls for plenty of replacement ports and also o lot of work by those with technical knowledge. Anyone who has this knowledge should not hove a spare moment of time. Every set he con keep in operating condition means that another man is available for reconditioning the transceivers of the big bombers. So we appeal to all our readers; use your technical knowledge now, as it is certain to be either of direct or indirect assistance to the war effort!

1942 07[edit]

Editorial

In times like these we are prepared to bear our extra burdens with a smile. But we feel sure our readers will join with us in raising a bit of a squeal about the new law which insists on extra licence fee if more than one radio set is installed in the home. If the money were to be used for a good purpose, we might feel better about it, but all of us know only too well of the way in which the A.B.C. has insisted on maintaining their worthless "A.B.C. Weekly", which drags nearly £1,000 a week from the licence revenue, is not read by three per cent of the listeners, and cannot even be considered as good publicity for the A.B.C. or its programmes. We feel sure that the A.B.C. would be making a far wiser move if they abandoned the "A.B.C. Weekly", even if they have to square off with Editor Deamer by paying out his contracted salary (and what a salary, too!) The money saved would be ample to allow the Commission to carry on with its efforts to provide programmes without this extraordinary licence fee, which con only have a negative effect on the popularity of broadcasting.

1942 08[edit]

Editorial

There are several clauses in the new Broadcasting Act which vitally affect the radio serviceman and dealer. It seems that quite a number of our readers are not yet acquainted with them, but ignorance of the law is not likely to hold good if any trouble ensues. Probably the most important regulation is the one which states that any person who sells a radio set must notify the Radio Inspector of the sale. Anyone who deals in radio, whether conducting a shop or not, should make immediate application to the Senior Radio Inspector, at the G.P.O., for registration as a dealer. No fee is required. Another point to be watched is in connection with the multiple licences required when more than one set is operated in any house. If there are two sets, the second requires an extra fee of 10/-. If there are three sets in the house capable of receiving programmes, then the licence fee for the three will be £2. Those who repair and service sets are entitled to special consideration and require only the one licence. The position of the extension speaker is interesting, being allowed without extra fee in the case of a private, house, but fees must be paid for each and every extension in the case of a hotel or lodging house. In a boarding house, any lodgers who operate receivers must have their own licences. In all cases of doubt about the new regulations it is safer to be sure than sorry. We suggest you make enquiries at the local post office, and if you cannot get a definite ruling be sure to contact the Radio Inspector.

1942 09[edit]

Editorial

We hear plenty about the problems which experimenters and radio mechanics have to face on account of the difficulty in obtaining component parts. Yet when we go into the matter fully we find that the position is not nearly as bad as it might be. We proved beyond a shadow of doubt that it is still possible to walk into almost any good radio warehouse and purchase a complete kit of parts for the construction of a. serviceable receiver, as mentioned elsewhere in the description of this particular set. Things are bad, but after all, not nearly as bad as in New Zealand, for example, where the construction of radio receivers is totally prohibited. At the moment of writing there is talk of the new austerity campaign and we wouldn't be greatly surprised if this austerity plan embraced similar legislation to that already in force in New Zealand. Even if this does come about, the position is not hopeless, as the authorities fully appreciate the value of the broadcast receiver and, doubtless, arrangements will be made which will ensure adequate component parts being made available for the maintenance of the million and a half receivers at present in use. So long as these components are available it would appear that the wide-awake experimenter will find plenty of scope for employing his energies most usefully. Even if the manufacture of sets is totally prohibited he will be able to make a dandy job of taking an old-time chassis to bits and rebuilding it with a modern coil kit and other components to make it into a really effective set.

1942 10[edit]

Editorial

It is only to be expected that war-time trading conditions are difficult, but it has come as rather a surprise to many that the difficulty takes the form of too much business, too much profit and the greatest difficulty of all - the payment of a huge income tax. At the moment the services of radio technicians are at an extraordinary premium, and those who accepted Mr. Graham's suggestion from the back cover and trained for a radio career must all have attained more than their fondest hopes. Notwithstanding the efforts to control prices the actual value of radio and electrical appliances is mounting every day. It is reported that a second-hand refrigerator which originally cost £57/10/- was sold recently for £137. Similarly with radio set and components there is a danger of a false value being given to goods which are scarce, especially when the seekers are earning big wages and have little to spend them on. Such trading, however, is most dangerous, as the authorities cannot be expected to show the slightest mercy to anyone who is found to be making an excessive profit. In the matter of the repair and adjustment of sets the practice of taking advantage of the present conditions seems to be prevalent and we have heard of several cases which would appear to indicate that exorbitant charges are being made for unsatisfactory work. Looking to the future, at first glance it might be thought that that the large number of men being trained in radio technique will eventually mean a saturation of the trade, but on further investigation it is very evident that the\ development of radio is wide enough to absorb all the men who are likely to be trained for many years to come.

1942 11[edit]

Editorial

Is television just around the corner? Again the question is raised, this time dug out of the post by the announcement that the British Government hos sent along a Major Osborne, who hos recently arrived in Australia to pave the way for television services to start as soon as the war is finished. Already there have appeared statements in the press and in broadcasting journals which hove apparently emanated from Major Osborne. These give the impression that television is wonderfully easy, quite cheap and capable of supplying people with something they want and need. Similar statements have appeared fairly regularly over the past fifteen years, but the progress of television has been quite slow, and anything but steady. Doubtless television will eventually become an interesting sideline to radio broadcasting, and also provide a fertile field for experimenting; but we still stick to the belief we have held for many years - that television will not displace radio broadcasting with a sudden rush. We still feel that our advice to readers not to invest their savings in television companies was quite sound. We would even go further and say that the same recommendation holds good for to-day and for the immediate (post-war) future. The fact that Major Osborne is with us, however, makes it fairly evident that someone is still thinking about television and, that we have something to which to look forward.

1942 12[edit]

Editorial

It is indeed sad that there should be those amongst us who, instead of helping the war effort, are wrangling and wire-pulling with a view to gaining for themselves a monopoly of·the radio repair business. We refer, of course, to the proposed scheme to allow component parts to be sold only to registered radio repairmen. Now is the time for every radio man, whether professional technician or boy novice, to do everything possible to keep radio sets in good operating condition. If the radio repair men like to get together to form a trade union, the move will be welcome. If the lofty ideals usually mentioned at the time of application for registration of such a union are kept in mind the radio repairmen will have ample scope for organisation without attempting to arrange a ban on the sale of components, or in any other way interfere with the freedom of any individual to repair his own set if he happens to have the necessary technical knowledge. It is not a heck of a long time since there wasn't a radio repairman in the whole of Australia. Anybody who wonted to have a radio set in those days had to build themselves a crystal set. Since then thousands of amateurs have built their own sets. These thousands are still with us, and only a small percentage are actively employed as radio repairmen. They have the knowledge necessary to cut their spare time to "keep 'em listening". It is ridiculous to suggest that they be denied the necessary parts.

1943[edit]

1943 01[edit]

Editorial

From what we can gather there has been an order issued which prohibits the manufacture of radio sets. Up till now we have not been able to find out whether the order will apply to those of us who assemble a set for ourselves once in a while, but it is only reasonable to expect that the prohibition will apply to all. The idea is to conserve stocks of component parts and make them available for the maintenance of existing receivers. With such a difficulty facing the radio trade it might be opportune to reassure our readers that there is little likelihood of the order affecting the progress of "Australasian Radio World." It is now some months since it was possible to order a kit of parts for a set and obtain them without difficulty. Yet over this period our little magazine has enjoyed unexpected popularity. Sales have risen steadily and, for our October issue, represent a peak in the seven-years' history of the publication. As might be expected, our advertising section is not as strong as in the good old days, but we still have a valuable list of loyal supporters. Annual subscriptions are as solid as ever. As a result, we have decided upon a policy of improvement and expansion starting with the appointment of Mr. J. W. Straede to the position of Technical Editor. Mr. Straede is a Bachelor of Science, and a radio engineer with a nicely blended balance between the theoretical and the practical and plenty of bright ideas. We are confident that his contributions will be even more popular in the future than in the past.

1943 02[edit]

Editorial

The news sessions being broadcast from Japan leave no doubt about the efficiency of the spy service being operated right here in Australia. It is fairly evident that the Japanese have an organisation which sends them full information on matters which should be kept secret. From the working of the Japanese spy system in Australia it appears almost certain that radio transmitters are being operated from Australia. One official view is that the transmitters must be installed in trucks, which move from place to place, making it a difficult job to track them down. No matter just how or where this Japanese transmitter is operated it appears to us to offer an exceptional opportunity for our readers to do something really startling; to unearth this transmitter. Most of our readers have sets which are capable of covering every wavelength from 5 to 550 metres, and somewhere in this band there must be some unusual type of noise or radiation, if not a straight out morse or phone signal. Perhaps the greatest difficulty is to appreciate that this spy transmitter is almost certain to be operated by an Australian or British person. This seems hard to believe, but it is equally unlikely that any Japs are walking about freely in Australia, so that we will have to look to the unexpected in this spy hunt. The suggestion that our readers should keep a sharp look-out for any suspicious transmission is quite unofficial, but we haven't any doubt that if any reader has anything to report he will have no difficulty in getting action from any police or military officer.

1943 03[edit]

Editorial

Post-war plans are popular topics for discussions, so let us not forget the place of radio. War-time radio has been responsible for tremendous developments which am not yet fully appreciated by all of us. Every plane in the bomber squadron keeps in constant touch with every other plane, as well as with its base; even the fighter pilots take their instructions by radio. Practically every unit of a modern mechanised army has its own transmitter and receiver. Tanks keep in constant touch with each other by radio, even the infantry battalions carry radio. All of which goes to indicate how radio can be applied to postwar conditions. Imagine the time which can be saved if all taxi-cabs carry radio and keep in touch with headquarters; if fleets of delivery trucks from the big stores are so equipped; as well as the fire brigades, ambulances, and the road patrols. Imagine the possibilities of radio transmitting as a hobby for the hundred thousand men who have been taught the theory and code in their army, navy or air force training. There is room on the air for at least fifty thousand radio "hams" and every prospect of them receiving official encouragement in recognition of the service they have given. In broadcasting there is ample room for development too, especially in the direction of television, and super high-fidelity sound on short-wave or with frequency modulation. Encouraged under the control of a man of wide vision and progressive ideals there is no limit to the possibilities of post-war radio development. Our only fear is that radio may be left in the grip of the P.M.G's Department, at the mercy of some old-fashioned official who sees in radio only a competitor to the telegraph and the telephone.

1943 04[edit]

Editorial

One of the outstanding features of this war has been the way in which rumours have been proved to be so dangerous. The power of suggestion is capable of wreaking havoc, even with people who would normally show reasonable discrimination. Which might lead you to think that we are going to tell you not to listen-in to the powerful Jap signal which romps in on the short-wave bands, or to repeat the oft-told tale of Station Ananias. Actually, however, our aim is more to dispel the many rumours about the difficulty of obtaining parts for the maintenance of receivers. There are many shortages and it would be futile to assert that all types of valves are readily available. On the other hand, things are not nearly as bad as they might be, and we have a long way to go before conditions will be as difficult as they are in England, where it has been estimated that more than a million receivers are silent for want of replacement parts. Strangely enough, some parts which might be expected to be scarce are readily available, and surprising results can sometimes reward a little scouting around the shops. We made an outsize in errors in the Queries page of last month's issue, by suggesting that certain old-type battery valves would be unobtainable, only to be corrected by the Mullard people, who happen to have handy stocks of many valves of types of which little has been heard for several years.

1943 05[edit]

Editorial

Recent correspondence has been sharply divided between those complaining of lack of service, and others asking why our staff is not working in the interests of the war effort. There have been good reasons for the complaints about the answering of letters, acknowledgements of subscriptions and so on. Of our office staff of seven persons a couple of years ago, not one remains. Bill DeCosier, our first office boy, was shot down in his Spitfire over the North Sea a couple of months ago. Of the rest, two are now prisoners of war, one in the A.I.F., two engaged on munitions production and even little Patsy is now a WAAF! Recently we made arrangements with an established office to handle our business affairs. This should mean vastly improved service without any drain on manpower. With regard to our war effort: Mr. Straede is a physicist in a munitions factory; Mr. Keast handles his short-wave pages in his spare time, and personally, having been rejected on account of physical unfitness, I put in over 56 hours per week as manager of D. M. HULL & Co., an engineering factory engaged solely on war work. Under the circumstances we feel that we are doing our best to justify the confidence of the thousands of subscribers and supporters who are greater in number today than ever before in the seven years history of the publication. - A. G. HULL.

1943 06[edit]

Editorial

Following on last month's editorial remarks about carrying on through strenuous times, we might also point out the debt which we and our supporters owe to those of our advertisers who have remained faithful. Some firms found that they were short of stock and they no longer needed to advertise to maintain their business. But they did NOT cancel their advertising. They realised that advertising can be something more than merely a bait with which to catch buyers. By maintaining their advertising they are doing an indirect, but none the less effective, service to their most valued clients, the technicians, servicemen and radio enthusiasts throughout the Commonwealth. We feel sure that we speak for all our readers, when we pledge ourselves to remember all this when peace returns and trading conditions return to normal.

1943 07[edit]

Editorial

It has been announced that a National Security order has been issued which provides that radio repairmen are to be licensed and zoned. All persons engaged in repairing or servicing radio sets who have not applied for a licence should do so before July 19. Applications should be addressed to the State Deputy Director of the Department of War Organisation of Industry at your capital city. It should be noted that those who do radio work in their spare time, or are capable of doing so, are invited to register and will be officially encouraged to carry on with work of this kind. At the moment of writing the full details of the scheme, and especially in regard to its control of radio component parts, have not been revealed, but it is evident that radio servicing is at last to receive the attention it warrants. We strongly advise all of our readers to make a point of sending in their names for registration immediately, as failure to register now may have far-reaching effects in the future.

1943 08[edit]

Editorial

Recently l have accepted invitations to hear amplifiers and receivers which proud owners have considered to be the pinnacle of perfection. In nearly every case I have been sadly disappointed, and without regard to the rules of etiquette and hospitality I have felt it my duty to insist on the production of a meter to prove the most blatant faults, such as putting three watts of energising power into a speaker field coil and then feeding it with ten watts of audio. One of the amazing features of the human body is the way in which the senses will accommodate themselves to changed circumstances. They say that after working in a tannery, or other place where there is an obnoxious smell, the nose soon becomes accustomed to that smell and it no longer seems unpleasant. The ears have a similar characteristic. If you listen long enough to distorted reproduction you can eventually fool yourself into imagining that it doesn't sound too bad. The ear, being such an unreliable judge of distortion, we suggest that wherever possible a periodic check should be made with meters. Unfortunately it is not so easy to thoroughly check distortion with simple meters, but much can be done by indirect methods. If an amplifier is correctly designed and the valves and other components are in good condition, then it is unlikely that distortion will be present. We specially suggest the testing of valves, and checking such points as the actual wattage in the speaker field, the plate current of each valve, and measurement of the effective bias voltage between each grid and cathode.

1943 09[edit]

Editorial

Anytime there happens to be a lull in the conversation you have only to mention post-war reconstruction and you will be sure to stir up plenty of enthusiasm. Take, for example, radio trading of the future. One thought is along the lines of extension of the socialism scheme, meaning possibly a standard design of "Peoples' Receiver," of utilitarian type, produced in big quantities under Government supervision and supplied at cost to each and every householder. For contrast, there are those who plan to produce elaborate receivers of the most deluxe specification, claiming that when people start to spend their savings and their repaid war loan bonds they will want the best. From an entirely different angle, there is the view that maybe the local radio manufacturers will have to face the prospect of free-trade, standing toe to toe and slogging for the market against the competition of mass-produced receivers from overseas, selling complete at a figure which the Australian public has become to regard as the price of a couple of valves. All of the above thoughts are possibilities, even as there is a possibility that conditions will return to exactly the same stage where we left off as the war became intensified. No matter what the answer may be we feel a happy confidence in the ability of the members of the Australian radio trade to face up to circumstances and overcome all obstacles, even as they did in the early days of their progress.

1943 10[edit]

Editorial

Once again the question of Marconi's early work on the development of radio communication has been brought into the limelight. The Supreme Court of the United States has ruled that Marconi did not invent radio and has invalidated the American patents of his, dated 1904. The court's opinion was based largely on the fact John Stone showed a four-circuit that a patent granted in 1902 to wireless telegraph apparatus substantially like that later specified and patented by Marconi. Irrespective of court decisions, however, there is no doubt that Marconi was the practical man who knew how to make the most from the new science. Which brings us to the point we wish to stress; there is a wonderful field of opportunity waiting for the firm or individual who can organise a really effective way of entering the field of electronics. Being so closely allied to radio, it is only natural that we turn to the radio engineers as the most likely men for the job. It has been demonstrated beyond a shadow of doubt that there are remarkable prospects for the commercial application of the photo-electric cell, thyratron, ignitron, kenatron, magnetron and the hundred and one other recently introduced applications of the electron stream. These units can be of great service to industry, yet they lie comparatively dormant, waiting for the right kind of publicity campaign to bring their merit under the notice of those who should be interested in their possibilities as aids to production. There is no need to wait until after the war is over, as they might well be obtained on the lend-lease plan to help in our war effort.

1943 11[edit]

Editorial

In this issue will be found the full details of the parts priority plan for radio servicemen. It is bound to be of vital interest to all our readers. Not actually covered in our issue, but already well publicised in the daily press, is the order controlling the sale of radio receivers. At the moment of writing, Dame Rumour has it that parts are to be frozen, too, and only released to servicemen. This is logical, so we won't be at all surprised if it has become a fact by the time these lines appear in print. There appear to be two trains of thought on the above moves. One is that control is inevitable; the other, a pious hope that the efficiency factor of the administration will be such that a better result will be achieved than could be obtained if the manpower hours of the organisation involved were applied to the production of materials and components. When the history of this period is being written, there is a chance that it will not appear as efficient as desirable, especially if account can be taken of the manpower hours wasted in wangling, hunting for black markets, waiting in queues, and so on. However, be that as it may, it is the clear duty of everyone to do their utmost to accept regulations as they come, abide by them as far as practical, and do everything possible to discourage the corruption of morals and principles which seem to be the unfortunate wake of Regulations. - A. G. HULL.

1943 12[edit]

Editorial

In a recent issue we reprinted some remarks about a court-case in America, dealing with radio patents and more particularly, the part which Marconi played in the invention of radio communication. This article aroused considerable comment, especially from those who are loyal supporters of Marconi. It has been pointed out often enough that wireless waves, as such, were first known as hertzian waves, after Hertz, German scientist who holds credit for their discovery. A correspondent has pointed out, however, that in December, 1889, an engineer, named Huber, wrote to Hertz and suggested the use of his oscillations for communications, but Hertz turned down the idea! Another correspondent points out that the preliminary experiments in the use of hertzian waves for communications were carried out by a Russian named Popov, who demonstrated reception before the Russian Physical-Chemical Society on May 7, 1895. This demonstration was not the mere starting of Popov's experiments, either, as he had lectured on the subject at the Marine Officers' Club in Kronstadt in the spring of 1889. Dealing with the recent interpretation by the Supreme Court in U.S.A., it is still far from clear that the court ruling did anything which could be defined as a contradiction of the generally-held view that Marconi was the father of radio communication. There seems little doubt that Marconi and his organisations reaped the honour, glory and financial reward to which they were rightly entitled.

1944[edit]

1944 01[edit]

Editorial

Lunching recently with Captain Knock (you would know him as Don Knock, radio editor of the "Bulletin" and a frequent contributor to "Australasian Radio World" in the good old days) the discussion veered to the influence of war on the future trends in radio set design and construction. It is very evident that the present demands in the matter of tropic-proofing will ensure that the commercial sets of the future will not be affected by humidity. Radio sets for the forces are tested by operating them with a hose playing on them. An army receiver is built in anticipation of being thrown overboard into saltwater, dragged up the beach on the end of a rope and then operating to perfection as soon as it is switched on! Country readers will be pleased to hear that the shelf life of batteries has been vastly increased through improved construction methods for providing better internal insulation. Post-war batteries should last nearly twice as long as previously. Australian technicians are also gaining valuable experience in handling communications-type receivers, some of the latest jobs being available "in official circles." It is expected that these designs will be studied intently and their best features digested so that Australian enthusiasts can hope to be catered for adequately with sets of a type which have previously existed only as pictures in American magazines. - A. G. HULL.

1944 02[edit]

Editorial

The prize contest announced in this issue is something considerably more than a mere essay contest. It has two major objects in addition to the worthy one dealt with at greater length in the announcement; the production of a standard circuit to relieve the pressure on design engineers. The first additional object is to provide suitable editorial matter, which is a great difficulty in these times of shortage of manpower. Technical radio has a most important role in the war effort and "Australasian Radio World" has its place in technical radio, yet we agree with manpower authorities that its publication should be carried on with as little drain on the manpower supply as is reasonable. Hence, if some radio enthusiasts can devote their leisure to indulging in a little journalism, it is going to be an indirect assistance to the war effort. The second additional object is to give us some guidance as to the prospects of securing the services of a suitable technical editor for a vast expansion programme which is ready to come into action immediately victory has been accomplished. The prospects of post-war radio are truly vast, and for our part we have laid our plans to maintain a position right out on the top of technical radio developments. Our choice of a suitable person for the congenial position of technical editor will be largely governed by the merit of technical articles contributed between now and then. - A. G. HULL.

1944 03[edit]

Editorial

In a recent issue we had a paragraph about a second-hand chassis which was advertised for £500. In the same issue we had an advertisement from one of our readers who was prepared to pay up to £150 for a really good short-wave set. These items have brought to notice several enquiries as to what can be expected from even the best of sets when it comes to receiving overseas stations on the short-wave band and long-distance stations on the broadcast band. Quite frankly, one needs to be a keen enthusiast in order to appreciate even the best of communications receivers. When a signal is so weak that it is below the normal noise level of the locality, it is quite useless to amplify it excessively, as the noise is also amplified. Communications sets sometimes cover from 9 metres, right through to 600, whereas the average dual-waver only covers from 16 to 47 metres and the broadcast band. But to the ordinary listener this extra coverage of wave-lengths is not a great advantage, as practically all the short-wave broadcasts worth hearing are available between 13 and 50 metres. Yet to the right type of enthusiast the communications set is worth every penny of its cost. The low internal noise makes medium strength stations into good entertainment, the extra selectivity allows a greater number of stations to be heard. But it is probably the minor refinements which create the right atmosphere; the smoothness of controls, the convenience of phone jacks, of a beat frequency oscillator for signal finding as well as morse reception, and so on. After all there is little fundamental difference between a cab horse and a racing thoroughbred. They both have legs at their four corners! - A. G. HULL.

1944 04[edit]

Editorial

We would not like to suggest that any of our readers could be unreasonable, but it is very apparent that a few of them are inclined to be completely carried away by their enthusiasm. They seem to get so carried away, in fact, that they completely overlook the problems of the times and expect to find that "Radio World" has an unlimited staff of technicians with plenty of time to spare to go into the most elaborate details of component design in order to maintain the queries service. Now, in case you are not aware, practically every radio magazine in the world has been forced to abandon its query service; we have stuck to ours so far in the hope that what little time we can afford will be duly appreciated. There are one or two points we would like to suggest, as they will make it possible for us to give better results for the time made available. Firstly, please write plainly, on one side of the paper, as briefly as possible, yet giving all the necessary facts, and attaching diagrams on a separate sheet of paper, so that they can be studied at the same time as the letter itself. Try and put yourself in our position and remember that the amount of time devoted to each query cannot possibly exceed ten minutes. Therefore it is quite useless to expect to have special power or output transformers designed to order. It is equally useless to ask to have a special set designed to use the junk or odd valves which you have on hand. - A. G. HULL.

1944 05[edit]

Editorial

In last month's issue we had an article about communications receivers and forecast their popularity in the post-war era. This suggestion has been challenged by an entrant in our Utility Circuit Contest Mr. P. Stevens, of "Westdale," Fletchers Avenue, Bondi, who says, "Weak or distant stations, marred by static and fading are seldom patronized except by the DX enthusiasts, and the same thing applies to overseas short-wave stations. The thrill of listening to the "truth" on Tokyo or Berlin radio through a more or less dense cloud of interference will end together with the war, and as the continuous sideband fading on short-waves makes the tonal quality rather poor, receivers should be built for broadcast only." Chatting with factory set designers about this subject has shown that there are quite a few who readily agree with the opinion expressed by Mr. Stevens, and there seems to be quite a chance that the preference for dual-wavers will fade like it has for other "selling features" such as clock dials and push-button tuning. We have not been able to conduct a "Gallup Poll" on lines extensive enough to be considered representative, but it is fairly obvious that not five per cent of the listening time of the average dual-wave receiver is spent on the short-wave band. Yet on the other hand we read of thousands upon thousands of pounds being spent on the erection of bigger and still bigger short-wave transmitters, and doubtless they expect to have vast audiences. - A. G. HULL.

1944 06[edit]

Editorial

Every now and then a new reader takes me to task for my rough and ready way of sketching out circuit diagrams without paying due attention to indicating suppressor grids, for example. Often enough I leave out the symbol for the heater, and my neglect of such things as iron cores in coils, or using the same condenser symbol for even electrolytics, is becoming almost notorious. I can only plead "guilty" to these crimes, but I would point out to my critics that there are several extenuating circumstances to be considered. I consider that "Australasian Radio World" is not the same as a text book, so there is not so much need to be pedantic. Most of our readers are men with a working knowledge of theory, and most of them are busy, so that they want simple circuits, easy to read at a glance, and with all essential details and values clearly shown but not cluttered up with intricacies. I consider, too, that the placing of capacity and resistance values right at the symbol is far more effective than giving each one a letter and then tabulating values, even if it doesn't look quite so professional. Not that it would make much difference if my style was all wrong, for it is now just as much a part of me as my handwriting and my signature. It would be a most difficult task to change either after all these years. - A. G. HULL.

1944 07[edit]

Editorial

With the invasion going well and the war news very bright at the moment of writing, it is perhaps natural to find that thoughts are turning more and more to the post-war problems and prospects. All over the world there will be huge stores of war material to be disposed, and the old parable of the "ill-wind" may be repeated. Here in Australia it has been estimated that when the war finishes there will be radio components in store to the value of about ten million pounds. Amongst these parts will be lots of transmitting valves, condensers and other parts which will not be suitable for use in broadcast receivers. They will be a wonderful windfall for those who operate experimental transmitters. There will be great stocks of components suitable for use in building the thousands upon thousands of receivers which ·will be required to satisfy the overdue demands of the ordinary listeners, and the whole of the radio trade will need to handle things carefully to ensure that these parts are put to good use without upsetting factory production or affecting normal trading. Some radio traders are apprehensive about the possible effects of the release of war surplus stocks, but others are quite confident that the matter can be easily handled by the trade, in close co-operation with the technical press, bringing about a boom in technical radio, with all-round benefits to the radio trade as a whole. - A. G. HULL.

1944 08[edit]

Editorial

The war effort has called upon the radio industry to supply huge quantities of equipment. Radio receivers and transmitters are required for fitting to practically every tank, plane, and boat. Hundreds are required for the maintenance of communications between various groups of men in action. The demand is being met in a marvellous way, considering the problems of production, but sometimes it is found that schedules cannot be maintained. Almost universally the explanation is that sufficient manpower is not available. Quite unofficially, we happened to go into this problem with a well-known factory executive and immediately formed the opinion that the problem was not really so much a matter of shortage of hands as the inefficiency of those employed. This was due, primarily, to the fact that the executives of the organisation were themselves overloaded with work. In this particular case the production was three times what would have been a rush in peacetime, yet there were fewer executives on the job. Needless to add, these executives were not in fit shape to get the best out of the employees. No one seemed to have the time to spare to see to the proper up-grading of the more intelligent "unskilled" workers, yet we feel sure that such time would not have been wasted. In fact we suggested that an intensive schooling of a few of the better-type staff, in this case especially senior females, would eventually lead to improved quality as well as quantity of production by removing a severe bottle-neck in the testing department. At any time, the overworking of executives does not lead to efficiency in the long run. - A. G. HULL.

1944 09[edit]

Editorial

Right in the midst of a lot of discussion about amplifiers there has been dropped a regular "block buster", full details of which we hope to reveal in next month's issue. Following closely on the heels of statements about "amplifiers beyond reproach", and "perfect direct-coupled amplifiers", a completely new and revolutionary circuit has come to hand. This circuit is so unconventional as to appear absurd, but is actually a definite step in the right direction and full of the most amazing possibilities. In a nutshell, it has been found that output impedance problems are solved if the output of a valve is taken by placing a load on the cathode circuit, instead of plate circuit. Tremendous loss of gain is incurred, but in these modern times this is of little importance, compared to the improved fidelity possible. As an example, an output valve required about twenty volts of signal input for ordinary use, but under the new operating conditions will require a signal input of 150 volts. One application of the scheme is for inter-stage coupling, using a cheap audio transformer, which then gives performance comparable with that of a super-duper high-fidelity one. Practical work with the new circuit has proved highly interesting and results are right up to expectations. Working with an audio transformer which cost 6/6 we have been able to get quality reproduction of a high standard, at the same time obtaining the advantage of low resistance in the grid circuit. This is highly desirable, but hard to achieve with resistance-capacity coupled amplifiers. - A. G. HULL.

1944 10[edit]

Editorial

Frequency modulation is headline news in the papers these days, following on statements which have emanated from Canberra. Following the usual routine, these statements have in due course been denied, and counter-statements have been issued. But where there is smoke you usually find fire, and so people gain the impression that there must be something to this frequency modulation business. The talk about frequency modulation has caught many radio engineers "on the hop", and we have been inundated for the back numbers in which the subject was dealt with, but these are no longer available. We have not had time to get a full story ready for this issue, but we plan to cover the whole subject in detail in next month's issue, including the possibilities which the scheme may open up. We do not under-estimate these possibilities, but at the same time we feel sure that they will take a considerable time to reach fruition and there is not quite as much need for a rush as some of our readers seem to feel. First the war has to be completely cleaned up, then the plans have to be laid, and we cannot imagine that frequency modulation will be a completely established service until at least a couple of years after the cessation of hostilities. In the meantime, radio technicians will have ample time to become thoroughly acquainted with the new technique.

1944 11[edit]

Editorial

To some outsiders it is difficult to understand the inspiration which motivates the radio enthusiast. Business acquaintances are amazed at the circulation of "Australasian Radio World." They cannot see why it sells so well at a time when radio parts are difficult to obtain, set construction is controlled and, generally, conditions are adverse for the experimenter. At the moment our sales are more than double the figure they were in 1939, and our subscribers number four times as many. What is the reason? You know the reason as well as I do. Radio is interesting. Reading about circuit developments is instructive and enjoyable. With simple equipment and a few "junk" parts it is possible to carry out practical experimenting which has excitement, even thrills for the keen radioman. Routine repairs of broken-down sets is not hum-drum work. In most cases it calls for the skill of the fictional detective, tracking down the trouble by careful analysis of clues which point the way. Sometimes the puzzle is quite baffling and the alert radioman pursues a most enjoyable hunt to locate the culprit component. Considering the practical angles only, the hard-headed realists have long pointed out that you can buy a radio set almost as cheaply as you can build one. But have you ever known anyone to derive so much enjoyment from a factory-built set as he gets from one built with his own hands, adjusted to suit his own taste and inside which he can visualize each component "doing its stuff" as the signal passes from aerial to speaker? The more we think of it, the greater is our faith in the future of the technical radio enthusiast.

1944 12[edit]

Editorial

Those of our readers who are enthusiasts on the subject of quality reproduction must be a little bewildered at the moment. We had hardly finished publishing an amplifier circuit "to end all amplifier circuits" when along came the cathode-follower scare. To add to the confusion, then came the results of the Victorian Amplifier Championship, indicating that beam power valves, even with inverse feedback, do not give the practical results which can be calculated for them by theory. Even direct-coupled enthusiasts were disappointed. In fact, it might be said that the Victorian contest puts us all back about fifteen years in our theories. To cap it all, along comes the latest issue of the famous Wireless World from London, with an article by well-known quality exponent H. A. Hartley, who now confesses that high fidelity reproduction is not desirable. The article is so complete in its coverage and so full of interest in every way that we feel bound to reprint it for the benefit of our many readers who are unable to obtain a copy of the English publication. At the same time we feel that some sort of explanation is needed to clarify our policy in these matters. Some letters have been received from irate readers who claim that we seem to be deliberately misleading them by publishing contradictory stories in quick succession. Briefly, our policy at the moment is to present all these theories as they come to hand. We leave it to you to use your own discrimination as to what you decide to follow.

1945[edit]

1945 01[edit]

EDITORIAL.

As this is the first issue in the year 1945 it may be permissible to reflect on the problems that have been surmounted in the past and mention the bright prospects for the New Year. It has been a part of editorial policy to avoid stressing the problems of the times and it has been gratifying to note that our subscribers seem to have appreciated them without our belabouring the subject. Now, these actual lines are being written in a caravan on Phillip Island, for the holidays. A koala bear is grunting as he nibbles the gum leaves overhead. The prospects are quite rosy. Charlie Mutton has recovered from the Amplifier Contest and several articles from his pen are already in the kitty waiting for future issues. Included is a new series on electronics. From a newcomer, J. G. Du Faur, are some handy articles, too, and there isn’t any doubt that these will be highly appreciated. They are of a high standard, like the Du Faur article in this issue. Enough to make any Editor happy is a fine series of articles on radio theory and fundamentals, written by Charles Aston, already well-known to our readers as a contributor who really can make difficult theory both easy and interesting. With the paper position easing and the above articles in hand it is clearly evident that 1945 is going to be a happy year for "Radio World" and its readers. — A. G. HULL.

1945 02[edit]

EDITORIAL.

Great interest will be aroused by the announcement in this issue that John Straede is to organise an amplifier contest of his own. Mr. Straede must fully appreciate the problems associated with such an undertaking, but is not deterred. He is buzzing around in his little car in search of advice about the many difficulties which may arise, hoping to nip them in the bud. In order to avoid disputes about the judging it is intended to have the decision reached by the audience as well as by competent judges who are not connected with the radio trade or with prize donors. Six major factors are to be taken into consideration in the judging: (1) volume; (2) freedom from distortion; (3) fidelity; (4) portability and flexibility; (5) accessibility and reliability; (6) cost of building. It is hoped to run a linearity curve for each amplifier submitted, also a frequency response curve, and to measure power output at actual grid current point. Every amplifier enthusiast will agree that the objects aimed at by Mr. Straede are indeed worthy, but many will have doubts about the ability of any single human being to handle the detail work involved in conducting such a contest with a representative entry of from fifty to a hundred amplifiers. To Mr. Straede we extend our best wishes for success to his ambitious proposal, but we hope that he will not be unhappy if, in spite of all precautions, the contest fails to settle the many debatable points about amplifier design and performance.

1945 03[edit]

EDITORIAL.

The future of the radio enthusiast who wants to experiment with transmitting appears to be assured. Those who want to own and operate their own transmitters should receive every encouragement and there is every evidence that this will become official policy in the immediate future. There is even a possibility that "hams" will be back on the air before the war is completely cleaned up. Restrictions will be unavoidable, of course. Considerable control will be necessary to prevent the ether being cluttered up, but it must be gratifying to hams to know that their war effort has been fully appreciated. Modern warfare is a matter of the finest of technicalities and it has now been revealed that one of the biggest factors in the winning of the Battle of Britain was the successful application of radiolocation technique, or radar, as we now call it for short. Just how many "hams" were directly connected with the development and application of radar is not known, but it is a pretty safe bet to say that probably 90 per cent gained a lot of their practical knowledge from radio experimenting. Now, with the return of peace, the logic of encouragement is clearly evident. Recently, several committees in the United States have been considering proposals for the allocation of post-war frequencies. It is noteworthy that not one committee has suggested any curtailment of the amateur bands and the only point in doubt concerns just how many additional bands should be handed over to the "ham." One suggestion is to add a "ham" band at around 15 metres and this would appear to be a most excellent one for DX work. A. G. HULL.

1945 04[edit]

EDITORIAL.

Several readers have written to let me know how much they appreciate the varied style of the articles now being presented in Australasian Radio World. From near and far come contributions, some of them possibly lacking in the niceties of journalism, but all from the hearts of enthusiastic radio men just like you and me. It takes an exception to prove the rule, and so I also find that some people are not in agreement with views expressed by contributors, and so they abuse me for not exercising greater editorial supervision. I can imagine that I am going to get into really hot water for publishing Mr. Stevens' article in this issue. Paul Stevens claims that Australian radio engineers have slavishly followed American design, thereby doing the wrong thing. Personally I do not think that Mr. Stevens has presented both sides of the case, nor do I think that his arguments are all entirely sound, yet I feel that the article is well worth publishing exactly as submitted. Some of my thin-skinned friends are going to be hurt by the inferences; others may be shocked by the audacity of anyone daring to suggest that our set designers are not infallible. My courage comes from the thought that in these days of so much talk about freedoms, that my readers should have the right to freely criticise, so long as their criticism is within the bounds of reason. Those who do not agree with views expressed will be gladly afforded space to state their claims and present their cases.

1945 05[edit]

EDITORIAL.

Now that censorship is being relaxed it is possible to tell some of the facts about the part which radio played in winning the war in Europe. It is now freely admitted that the British supremacy in radiolocation was of tremendous help. In the Battle of Britain we were using radiolocation so effectively that every time a German bomber arrived over England there was a team of Spitfires and Hurricanes waiting for it and a few thousand feet above it. The Germans gained the impression that England had unlimited numbers of fighter aircraft, whereas it was the work of the British radio engineers which told the R.A.F. just where and when to expect the German bombers. It has also been revealed that the Navy pays due tribute to radiolocation. It has been stated in English papers that the success of the Allied naval gunnery was due to the use of radar aiming and distance finding. The scientific application of radio knowledge is given full credit for victory in the Battle of Matapan. Directly and indirectly the radio enthusiast and the keen amateur transmitter have been responsible for the Allied supremacy in radar and communications. It is therefore only right and logical to expect the authorities to give every possible encouragement for the further development of radio as a scientific hobby. So far there is every indication that this is so, but it is the duty of everyone interested to get behind the Wireless Institute of Australia, as the recognised mouthpiece of amateur radio, and make sure that the subject is kept clearly before the minds of those officials who have been appointed to control the ether. — A. G. HULL.

1945 06[edit]

EDITORIAL.

Of tremendous interest to all radiomen and to the radio trade as a whole are the announcements from both England and America that the use of the walkie-talkie in peacetime is to receive official encouragement. Elsewhere in this issue we give details of the American plan, which sets out to encourage manufacturers to market cheap transmitter-receivers for civilian use. Applications of walkie-talkie will become accepted as just another modern convenience. The wavelengths allotted for use with walkie-talkie may appear startling to those who have not been in close touch with recent radio development. The use of wavelengths below one metre calls for special technique, but there is nothing to be afraid about and we look forward to that not too far distant day (we hope) when we will be running constructional articles telling you how to build and operate your own transmitter for use on this band. It is expected that some sort of licence will be required, but no qualification tests, such as a theory examination or a speed test in morse code as was, and probably will be, required for the licence to operate an experimental transmitter working on the longer wavelengths. It should be clearly understood that there is no question of the walkie-talkie licence replacing the amateur experimental licence, and, if everything turns out as we have every reason to hope, the two classes of transmitting licences will be complementary to each other, co-operating to create even greater interest in technical radio than ever before. The prospects are exceedingly rosy.

1945 07[edit]

EDITORIAL.

The Wireless Institute of Australia has issued a "white paper" in the form of a list of draft proposals for post-war experimental radio. The suggestion is made that there should be three types of amateur licences. The new licensee is to pass the usual type of examination and is then allowed to operate a power of 50 watts on morse code for the first six months. If all goes well he is then allowed to operate telephony, still on 50 watts for another six months. Having operated for twelve months without falling foul of any trouble, the ham is then allowed to step up to a "B" licence, which allows him to use 100 watts of power. After operating under "B" class conditions for six months; and passing a test in Higher Radio Technology and Electrical Theory and morse code at 16 words per minute, the amateur operator will then qualify for a licence to operate an "A" class station at 250 watts of power. Many other matters are covered, such as minimum ages for class "C" at 16 years and class "B" at 18 years, but the above outline gives a fair idea of the plan. To us the scheme seems sound, except for that one sore point of ours, the morse code test. In both England and America there appears to be a trend to abandon the code test as having little use. War experience has shown that morse code communication is slow, unsatisfactory and generally considered quite out-of-date. To some people the code comes easily, to others it means hundreds and hundreds of hours wasted in "swotting," ending in sad disappointment to the nervous candidate when he makes a few errors at the examination. A. G. HULL.

1945 08[edit]

EDITORIAL.

It is unfortunate that censorship has made it necessary to suppress the telling of the wonderful tale of what radio and radar have done to ensure victory, to save lives and to make the winning of the war so much more pleasant than would otherwise have been the case. I recently encountered (and I don’t mean met) a National Service Officer who really thought that the only use for radio in the forward areas was to provide the troops with light entertainment! There was a man who held the destiny of hundreds in the palm of his hand, yet knew nothing of the achievements of electronics. Needless to add, when I left him he had an impression that there was something more to radio than horror serials. I hope that I did not reveal any of the "Confidential" and "Top Secret" angles on the latest methods of gun aiming, shell velocity measuring, and so on. I feel that it is the duty of every one of our readers to do what he can to spread the gospel about radio and radar, even if he can only go as far as to tell what has already been released in our recent articles on radar and the vital part it played in the Battle of Britain. There is so much about radio that is not worthy. Many of the abuses of broadcasting must make the radio pioneers squirm in their graves, but at least radio's part in the fight for freedom is something worth while for the poets to write about. Let’s all do our part and make the most of it. It is a fine topic for conversation with your friends and customers. A. G. HULL.

1945 09[edit]

EDITORIAL.

You will be interested in Mr. Langford Smith’s article in this issue in which he announces, on behalf of the Amalgamated Wireless Valve Company, the type numbers of the valves which are to be recommended as the standard or preferred-type valves for the immediate future. In his article Mr. Langford Smith gives a full explanation of the reasons behind the choice of these valves, giving the article added interest. After reading the article you will doubtless agree that the policy adopted is sound and logical. It is to be hoped, however, that the powers-that-be will appreciate that it is not reasonable to expect the local factories to produce every type of valve that the fertile mind can conceive, and make due allowance by making it easy for importers to land stocks of those particular valve types which cannot be produced locally on an economical basis. Valves such as the 6SN7GT and other twin types, for example, have many special applications and if the local experimenters are denied a chance to obtain small quantities of these valves it may tend to retard progress. It almost looks as though we need two classifications for considering the importation of valves, giving preference to the types which are not locally-made. The locally-made valves are reasonably satisfactory and doubtless they can supply the need for all standard types. Whilst on the subject of valves, we hope that a more legible branding of type numbers can be made, and that a handy abbreviation can be found for the mouthfuls like "6SN7GT." How about starting off a new run of serial numbers or letters say, a single type letter, such as "A," "B," "C," etc., stamping it into the bakelite base and painting on a colour code as well? A. G. HULL.

1945 10[edit]

EDITORIAL.

My editorial in the July issue has drawn sharp criticism from a reader who has just returned from four years service with the R.A.F. He says that he hates to see personal bias creeping into a fine magazine. The subject under discussion, to save you turning up the July issue, was that old one of morse code versus phone for ham licence qualification. I fail to appreciate the crack about personal bias, as I did not make any effort to disguise the fact that the opinions expressed were my own, carried my own signature at the bottom and were published for the sole purpose of letting readers know what I thought about the subject. I am not unreasonable enough to expect every reader to agree with everything I say, but surely I have just as much right to express my views as anybody else. To make quite sure that nobody can have cause to grouch I will hand over the editorial column this month to the morse code exponent, Con. A. Stiglish (ZL4DU) of New Zealand. Amongst many other things this is what he thinks about it: "My experience in the R.A.F. as a wireless operator has proved to me the value of c.w. To my knowledge, the R.A.F. had no overseas radio telephone links. Inter-comm and circuits were all c.w., some hand speed, some high speed. Spelling out words by phone is slower than sending letters by c.w. For copying through QRM or QRN and on a busy channel, give me c.w. every time. In cases of emergency it is easier to rig up a c.w. outfit and power drain is lower. Using a given power you will get further on c.w. I think that an amateur should be an all-rounder, equally efficient on phone or c.w., as each has its advantages and disadvantages." All of which is sound and logical, but doesn’t explain the reason why four words per minute greater speed in morse code should be the deciding factor as to whether a ham should be allowed 50 watts or 250 watts. — A. G. HULL.

1945 11[edit]

EDITORIAL.

During the war years no new radio receivers were manufactured for civilian use, yet sets were operated day after day for many hours. It was expected that when the war ended and civilian sets came on the market again there would be a rush to buy them. It is, therefore, with considerable dismay that some traders who have advertised sets in recent weeks have found that enquiries are not up to expectations. Whereas a few months ago it was possible to sell a secondhand radio set for almost any price, the position today is quite different. With a view to finding a satisfactory answer to the problem we have recently conducted a sort of "Gallup Poll" on a small scale, and it is evident that people are not necessarily going to rush first sets to come on the market. We heard from plenty who are saving up for a new home, and may buy a set after they get the home. In other cases it is a new car they are saving up for. One naive person told us that he was going to wait until American sets were available in Australia! But the worst feature of the replies was the number who said they were going to wait for television, frequency modulation and the other "wonderful improvements" to be expected after so much war-time research. Which goes to show a regrettable lack of technical knowledge on the part of those who make the wild statements, as well as those who believe them. It seems the trade may have cause to regret that it has done so little to encourage a public appreciation of technical radio topics. — A. G. HULL.

1945 12[edit]

EDITORIAL.

THE PERSONAL TOUCH There is another aspect of postwar radio trading which is now making itself felt. It appears that Mrs. Subbubb has been calling in the local radio repairman, Tommy Twistem, and she has become greatly impressed by the way he twiddles the knobs and cocks his head on one side whilst mouthing extraordinary technical phrases. In a nutshell, she has great confidence in his radio knowledge. Now, Mrs. Subbubb has decided that she needs a new set. Will she buy a "Multiplane Diallo" or a "Synthetic Atomiser?" She won’t have either; she insists that Tommy Twistem build her a special set of his own, built just the way he thinks a set ought to be built and put together with the same personal touch that kept the old set in such good form during the war years. Live radio dealers are making the most of the above set of circumstances, for they may not last long. The war period will soon fade into the dim past, especially when the big factories get their new plans into production, including horrible under-sized, under-powered midgets at retail prices of £10 and less. Such midgets are awful to contemplate, but apparently represent the heights of ambition to some factories. A. G. HULL.

1946[edit]

1946 01[edit]

EDITORIAL

I laughed at a comic drawing in the local paper recently. In the first picture a man was struggling on to the step of an overcrowded bus, m uttering to himself, "There’s lots of room if the people on board would just move up a bit." In the second picture the bus has reached the next stop and this time our hero is muttering, "Surely these silly fools don’t think they can get on this bus; they ought to be able to see that it is overcrowded already." The radio trade is like that, too. You find that many people with a handy knowledge of the radio game change over from amateur to professional status, set themselves up in business and, when firmly established, they take on a high and mighty air of superiority and mutter, "The Government ought to stop people starting up in the radio business unless they are fully qualified." Few people in the radio trade are able to boast that they can pass examinations in every phase of radio theory, but this does not mean that they need be unable to give the public service or make profits. On the contrary, they may be endowed with more commonsense, business acumen and general knowledge than those who have spent the best years of their lives in the cloistered halls of a University. A reasonable amount of healthy competition is likely to be a far better safeguard to the public than any government regulations or examinations. A. G. HULL.

1946 02[edit]

EDITORIAL

It is high time the authorities took a more realistic view of the relationship between radio and foreign spies. Twenty years ago it was reasonable enough to expect to find that every enemy spy, in books of course, had a radio transmitter with which to pass on the secret codes. But in these enlightened days it is quite ridiculous to find that a special form has to be filled in before a type 807 valve can be purchased, apparently to prevent it being put to nefarious uses by enemy agents! Any person with the remotest knowledge of radio transmitting should be able to appreciate that any old 6L6 will do exactly the same job as the 807 for the brief space of time which a spy would need to send his messages. The 807 would have a life of so many thousand hours, whilst the 6L6 would be so overloaded that its life might be curtailed to a few hundred hours, but would that worry the spy? Any spy worthy of the name could make up a most effective transmitter from receiver parts, so why the fancy forms for the poor 807, for condensers of high voltage rating and so on? Then again in the matter of penalties. If an over-enthusiastic lad can't wait to turn 18 in order to get his ham licence and goes on the air as a pirate, he commits a crime far worse than burglary or arson. Apparently it is still another echo of the bad old days when spies used radio transmitters! How many decades will it be before Those-in-Charge recognise radio transmitting as a reasonable hobby for intelligent people? A. G. HULL.

1946 03[edit]

EDITORIAL

Whether the war is over or not seems to be a matter of legislation, but so far as "Radio World" is concerned we are a long way from being back to where we started. Owing to a chain of unavoidable circumstances we find that the only roof under which the "Radio World" typewriter can find shelter is located in Melbourne, whilst the printing press is still in Sydney. To obtain office or personal accommodation in Sydney seems to be well beyond the limit of possibility at the moment and so we are making the best of things as cheerfully as possible. As is often the case, when you have high expectations you may feel disappointment more acutely. Conversely, when you are not over-expecting you can be happily surprised. So it happens in this case. We conjured up many visions of the problems which would arise with such an arrangement, but now that we are settling down to it there appears much to be happy about. The Melbourne radio trade is giving splendid co-operation and as a result our readers can look forward to many new components designed especially to suit their requirements and embodying new lines of thought. The Sydney trade has its own particular problems, but is also concentrating on new products to suit the changing times. We are in a handy position to co-operate with both sources of supply and so we should be able to give our readers far more interesting articles than if we were only associating with the Sydney trade. A. G. HULL.

1946 04[edit]

EDITORIAL

There seems to be considerable disappointment expressed by our readers in regard to the lack of startling developments in receiver design. Not only our readers, but the public in general seems to feel that the amount of work done on radar and radio equipment for the forces should have brought to light something worthwhile for incorporation in post-war receivers. The commercial receivers now being placed on the market seem to be very little different from pre-war sets, except in regard to prices, these having gone up with the general trend of the money market. Neither do our own issues bristle with new ideas in technical development, as several of our readers have pointed out to us in no uncertain terms. Frankly, that is just how it is. The wartime developments will be very much in evidence when we get around to battery portables, with the new peanut valves and the lightweight minimax batteries; there is also plenty of scope for experimentation on the higher frequencies, but ordinary broadcast receivers appear to have reached a certain amount of stagnation. We don't expect this position to remain indefinitely and we have two outstanding developments in hand in our own lab., waiting for a bit more work to be done before they are released, but otherwise we feel that we can best fill in time by commercial organisation, keeping the needs of the experimenter before the manufacturers of components, and generally paving the way for the radio enthusiast to pursue his hobby under ideal conditions. A. G. HULL.

1946 05[edit]

EDITORIAL

Ten years ago "Australasian Radio World" was launched. Since then, despite the eventful times, it has made steady progress and gained the widest coverage of the Commonwealth and New Zealand. Every reader is a keen and active radio enthusiast, varying in status from amateur to professional. All are associated in the turnover of a big amount of money in the radio trade. Our recent co-operative effort with Mr. Magrath and his "Little Companion" kitset brought in orders for many thousands of pounds' worth of kits. That we know, but just who are our readers, how they are connected with technical radio and why they read "Radio World," are a few of the things we would like to know more about. In a nutshell: we'd like a closer personal contact with our readers. To start the ball rolling, we have in this issue a number of personal paragraphs telling the background of some of the contributors who have done so much to provide fine technical articles. This is just a step in the general direction of a new trend in editorial policy: the introduction of the personality angle. In this issue we deal with ourselves, but in future issues we hope to deal with you — our readers. After you have read this month's issue, we expect that you will find it easy to sit down and write us a line, telling about yourself and your work. All letters will be gratefully received; paragraphs from them will be used in future issues and are sure to interest all our readers. A. G. HULL.

1946 06[edit]

EDITORIAL

Congratulations on last month's birthday issue have poured in from all parts of the Commonwealth, but unfortunately these have been punctuated by the sad cries of those who missed the issue. Expecting it to be rushed, we arranged for the extra printing of a couple of thousand issues, but it was not nearly enough. In the hope that it will save disappointment we would like it clearly understood that we do not have any spare copies available and it is useless to write direct for them or to request that new subscriptions be dated back to start with the May issue. On the happier side, however, the response was equally terrific, and, as you will soon see as you glance through this issue, it has brought forth a fresh crop of interesting contributions from readers. We know that no matter how many staff writers we employ we can never hope to cover the many angles and aspects of technical radio and its associated electronic applications, but if each and every reader will co-operate from time to time by sending along a short article about the subject with which he is most closely acquainted then we will, in the aggregate, have worthy editorial content in every issue. This month's issue shows what co-operation can do and it only remains to again ask you all to write us a note every time you think of something likely to interest other radio enthusiasts like yourself. A. G. HULL.

1946 07[edit]

EDITORIAL

Many of our readers, in the course of their letters, reveal that they are disappointed at the rate of progress which the radio game is making on its journey from the shadows of war to the sunshine of peace. Frankly, we disagree with this attitude. Being in a position to know something of the problems of the moment, we feel sure that everybody concerned is doing a good job, and steady progress is being made, even if it is not spectacular. Some readers seem to think that the heavy income tax is having a crippling effect on initiative; others seem to have an idea that production would be stepped up by manufacturers if they were free from price control. Possibly these factors are having a slight influence on the trend of affairs, but I feel sure that most of us are fully aware of our obligations and are making a definite effort to give customers the fullest service and attention which is possible under present circumstances. Taking our own particular case, we realise that our present issues are not yet back to the full size which we were able to publish before the war, but it must be remembered that our production costs are more than double; yet the price of each issue is still the same as pre-war. Likewise, our advertising rates have not been increased, although our printing bill (due partly to increased circulation and partly to increased cost of paper and printing) is more than double what it used to be. Readers can rest assured that we are keenly on the job and, just as soon as we can, we will publish bigger and better issues.

1946 08[edit]

EDITORIAL

Further to last month's editorial, the progress of the radio trade is not very rapid in regard to peak production of new components. Apart from one or two real battlers, the rest seem to be happy enough to jog along with their old-style components, and with a comparatively limited production rate of even those. There are so many obstacles to the production of new lines; so many hurdles to be overcome in order to obtain big quantities of raw materials and so little encouragement (from an income tax point of view) that it is not surprising that we find considerable difficulty in getting bright articles to fill our issues. We had a big stunt lined up for this month's issue, but production difficulties held it up at the last minute. Fortunately, however, another interesting receiver turned up on time and so we are able to have a main feature article well up to standard. With regard to the support, too, we managed to find a way out of the difficulty which seems to have proved a lot better than we first expected. This takes the form of a trip into the past; a review of some of the articles which were published in Volume No. 1 in 1936 and 1937. These circuits were all popular in their time, proved themselves capable of giving splendid results and are just as useful today as when they were first published. Since our circulation figures are four times greater today than they were when these circuits were published it is certain that they will be new to many of our present readers, and even to our long-time supporters they should not lack interest. - YOUR EDITOR.

1946 09[edit]

EDITORIAL

Again and again crops up the matter of the application of the morse code test as a gauge of a person's suitability to be granted an operator's certificate. In this morning's mail is a letter from a radio enthusiast who is undoubtedly a fellow of the type who would make the best possible use of a transmitting licence, and who has seen several years of service as a radio mechanic, with the R.A.A.F. But his doctor has given him strict orders that he is not to tax his nerves by attempting the strenuous concentration necessary to master the code. To some people the morse code comes easily, to others it is a nightmare. Strangely enough, it is not the intelligently dumb or the reckless irresponsibles who have the most difficulty with the code. For fifteen years past I have battled on this particular subject without making any noticeable impression on anyone, except to offend several people with an editorial I wrote for "Wireless Weekly" about ten years ago, when I said something about the morse code test being proof that a person has the mentality of a parrot, rather than proof of his ability to handle a transmitter. There may be justification for a knowledge of morse code by those who use the communication bands, but is there no chance of a relaxation of the Regulation for those who want a licence to operate radio-controlled models? - A. G. HULL.

1946 10[edit]

EDITORIAL

Bricklayers are hard at work on a new home for "Australasian Radio World" and the proprietor-editor, A. G. Hull. The site of the new combined office, laboratory and home is on the Beleura Hill, overlooking Mornington, bayside holiday resort about thirty miles out of Melbourne. The choice of such a site may come as a surprise to many, but it is the considered opinion of Mr. Hull that there is much to be said for decentralisation, especially as regards a business such as the publishing of "Australasian Radio World," which is largely carried on by mail. In an ideal country setting, with a view extending over Port Phillip Bay from Melbourne to the Heads on one side, and over the rolling hills from the Dandenongs to the Western Port Bay on the other, a brick home has been planned with all the usual features of a country home on the ground floor, but with all the city conveniences as well. Upstairs a large attic is divided into an office, studio, radio laboratory, workshop and photographic darkroom. Mr. Hull hopes to be settled in the new home within a month or six weeks. Working under such ideal conditions he intends to launch an intensive editorial campaign, backed by a technical development programme. At the same time he hopes to be able to catch up with his somewhat overdue task of acknowledging the many hundreds of letters which are at present on hand. - A. G. HULL.

1946 11[edit]

EDITORIAL

A number of readers are annoyed at the slow progress being made towards the introduction of communications-type receivers on the Australian market. Just before the war we had occasion to mention this subject several times, without much success. Then came the war and several local factories made communications receivers to the order of the Ministry of Munitions. The local receivers were excellent in every way, quite up to world standard. Now many short-wave enthusiasts can't understand why these receivers cannot be bought for love or money. Enquiry reveals that in most cases the communications-type receivers that were manufactured in local factories were complete projects of the Ministry of Munitions. The Ministry stood the initial cost of the development and tooling up for these receivers and it is not possible for the factories concerned to use this equipment for ordinary commercial set production. Eventually the special tools, dies and jigs may be declared as surplus to the requirements of the Ministry, then handed over to the Disposals Commission for sale, and finally come to be put to good use in the production of communications-type sets for ready sale to our many eager enthusiasts. In the meantime, one possibility is the indenting of English receivers of this type, which appear to have been considerably improved as a result of war-time research. They are available in England at comparatively easy prices and can be imported without much trouble. - A. G. HULL.

1946 12[edit]

EDITORIAL

How times have changed! Before the war we used to run special Christmas issues, with many extra pages of editorial matter and dozens of extra advertisements, mostly directed at drawing in more business for Christmas. This year the position is very different. Even some of our keenest supporters are asking us to leave out their advertisements because they already have more business than they can handle and they just don’t know how they can possibly get through the Christmas rush. Twelve months ago we were looking forward to all sorts of good things; we expected that communications-type receivers would be available in hundreds at reasonable prices; we hoped that everything would be back to normal within six months. Now, as the year draws to a close, we look back and find that there have been many disappointments — the communications-type receivers have not materialised, even the old-style components have not come through in anything like sufficient quantities to meet demands. In our own particular line the paper situation showed signs of improving, and we managed to get hold of a little amount of paper of almost pre-war quality, but this is getting harder and harder to obtain and we may yet be forced to go back on to the poorer quality news-print which we had to use during the war. It all seems such a pity, for now is the ideal time to attain the millennium. If everybody who is capable of working would concentrate on doing something useful in the way of production, we could soon reach a state of affairs where everybody would be able to have every thing they can think of: a new car, new home, new furniture, new radios. It only needs a successful production drive instead of strikes, go-slow policies and lack of initiative. — A. G. HULL.

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