History of Western Theatre: 17th Century to Now/Russian Realist

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The dominant playwright of the Russian realist school is Anton Chekhov (1860-1904), whose main play in the 19th century is "Дядя Ваня" (Uncle Vanya, 1899), characterized like the rest of his mature plays by tragicomic characters ridden with anguish and purposelessness, some of whom with great hopes that their life, contrary to what may seem, has not spent in vain, but serving as a harbinger of humankind's future happiness. An important precursor of these plays is "Месяц в деревне" (A month in the country, 1855) by Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883). Of great interest as well is gritty peasant play: "Власть тьмы" (The power of darkness, 1886) by Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910). Another dramatist of interest is Alexander Ostrovsky (1823–1886), author of "Гроза" (The storm, 1859), like the above a play of social criticism.

Anton Chekhov was the dominnat playwright of late 19th century Russian theatre, 1901

"Uncle Vanya"[edit]

"Uncle Vanya". Time: 1890s. Place: Russia.

"Uncle Vanya" text at http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Uncle_Vanya

From left to right: Artem as Telegin, Lilina as Sonya, Raevskaya as Maria Voynitsky, Constantin Stanislavsky (1863-1938) as Dr Astrov, Olga Knipper (1868-1959) as Elena, Vishnevsky as Voynitsky, Moscow Art Theater, 1899

Astrov, a country doctor, is called to attend to a retired professor, Alexander Serebryakov, master of an estate, mainly under the management of Vanya, the brother of his deceased wife, and Sonya, his daughter by this previous marriage. Vanya complains about how the order of the household is disrupted with the arrival of the professor. He virulently criticizes himself for misjudging the intellectual quality of his former brother-in-law in front of Dr Astrov, having wasted twenty-five years at the service of a charlatan, to which Vanya’s mother mildly objects. However, Vanya only has praises for his present wife, Elena. After noting that Alexander has no physical ailment as such, Astrov criticizes the idleness and indifference of country life, particularly in regard with the mismanagement of the environment. Alone with Elena, Vanya declares his love for her, but she rejects him. Late that night, Alexander complains to his wife of breathing problems and old age. As a result of her father's complaints, Sonya sends for Astrov again, but the professor, feeling better, nonchalantly leaves without seeing him. Elena is distraught by discords in the house, Vanya by lost hopes. He met Elena too late, and the professor is not the genius he first thought he was in his youth, having accomplished nothing of worth. Concerned with their own woes, Astrov and Vanya drink heavily. Sonya scolds Vanya for it, being of the opinion that the only way out of their doldrums is through work. Sonya also laments Astrov's heavy drinking in a tone suggesting love and concern of him, to which he appears unaware. Sonya meets Elena, intent on resolving their past differences, but both are fixated on their own problems. Elena is unhappy about her marriage, Sonya hoping to marry Astrov. The following day, Alexander calls for a family meeting. Aside with Elena, Vanya urges her to break free from her husband, but once again she rejects him. Noticing Sonya's love for Astrov, Elena proposes to sound him on his feelings towards her. When she does so, Astrov reveals he has no amorous passion for Sonya whatsoever, laughingly concluding that this question is meant to sound his eligibility for her own passion towards him. Astrov kisses Elena as Vanya pathetically enters with a bunch of roses. More distraught than ever, Elena pleads Vanya to use his influence on her husband so that the married couple may leave the house immediately. As the retired professor enters, Elena briefly signals to Sonya Astrov's negative response. Alexander proposes to sell the estate, at which, Vanya, crushed, asks him where does he propose he and Sonya should live. Vanya casts in his former mentor's teeth his ingratitude, for it is he and Sonya who have managed his estate. After angry words are exchanged, Vanya quickly leaves the room. Alexander follows to placate him. A pistol shot is heard. Alexander returns, chased by Vanya, who fires, misses, laughs at himself, and sinks into a chair. Later, Astrov asks Vanya to give him back a vial of morphine, enough to kill a man, which he relunctantly does after Sonya's intervention. Alexander and Elena bid everyone farewell. As so many times in the past, Sonya and Vanya remain to calculate house accounts, she expressing her belief that personal salvation comes through work and that eventually they will "find rest".

Ivan Turgenev described the pains of unrequited love. Photo by Félix Nadar (1820-1910)

"A month in the country"[edit]

"A month in the country". Time: 1850s. Place: Russia.

"A month in the country" text at http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks03/0300831h.html

Constantin Stanislavski (1863-1938) as Mihail and Olga Knipper (1868-1959) as Natalia in the 1909 production at the Moscow Art Theatre

In the house of Arkady Islayev, a wealthy landowner, a friend of the family, Mihail Rakitin, spends much time in the company of his wife, Natalia. Mihail questions Alexey, the recently hired tutor to their son. Alexey mentions he once translated a French novel without knowing any French at all. A neighbor of theirs, Afanasy Bolshintsov, owner of over three hundred serfs, asks the advice of their family doctor, Ignaty Shpigelsky, concerning a possible marriage between himself and Vera, orphaned ward of the Islayevs. Should this be accomplished, Afanasy will give him three horses. Ignaty introduces the subject to Mihail, who, in turn, does so to Natalia. She does not like the idea, considering the man a "stupid creature". Of greater importance to himself, in view of his love of her, Mihail notices Natalia's infatuation for Alexey. When Natalia mentions Afanasy to Vera, she miserably answers: "I'm in your power, Natalia Petrovna." Natalia assures her she will not be forced into this marriage. Then she learns that Vera loves the man she loves herself, Alexey. A worried Mihail selfishly advises Natalia to dismiss Alexey. Instead, Natalia seeks to find out whether Alexey loves Vera. He does not seem to. Meanwhile, Ignaty courts Lizaveta, another family friend, seeming to make some headway there. Vera discovers that Alexey does not love her and also that Natalia loves him, perhaps planning to marry her off to Afanasy after all. To Alexey's astonishment, Natalia declares her love to him, but she hesitates on whether he should leave the house, finally deciding she cannot have him go. Meanwhile, Arkady notices Mihail's attachment towards Natalia. A sad witness to Natalia's love of another, Mihail decides to leave. Also unable to live any longer with Natalia, Vera questions the doctor about Afanasy, who assures her he is most kind-hearted and "like dough". To Natalia's grief, Alexey, uncomfortable with his position as the recipient of his mistress' love, decides to leave the house as well. Mihail grits his teeth while Arkady expresses his gratitude for this sacrifice to their friendship. Lizaveta is also to go, having agreed to marry Ignaty, glad at obtaining the horses.

Leo Tolstoy reported on greed and murder in the peasant class. Portrait by Ilya Repin (1844–1930), 1887

"The power of darkness"[edit]

"The power of darkness". Time: 1880s. Place: Russia.

"The power of darkness" text at http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Power_of_Darkness

Illustration of the power of darkness, from Russian Theatre, Brentano's, New York, 1922

Nikita, a laborer on Peter Ignatitch's estate, is forced by his father to marry Marina. Anisya, Peter's wife but Nikita's lover, weeps at these news and feels betrayed. "My old man will die one of these fine days, I'm thinking; then we could cover our sin, make it all right and lawful, and then you'll be master here," she says, consoling herself. Matryona, Nikita's mother, observing their embraces, is content merely to say: "What I saw I didn't perceive, what I heard, I didn't hearken to. Playing with the lass, eh? Well,- even a calf will play. Why shouldn't one have some fun when one's young?" She is against the marriage, preferring Nikita to keep his well-paid position, and so she buys poison so that Anisya may use it on her husband, at which the latter pays her back. Matryona's husband, Akim, finds a job in town cleaning cesspools and prefers to have his son stay at home, all the more so because otherwise he will wrong Marina if he does not marry her, but Matryona calls her a common slut and her son suggests in a roundabout way the same. Marina accuses Nikita of deceit, knows he does not love her any more, and knows whom he loves at the moment, at which he brutally sends her on her way. As Peter is being slowly poisoned over the course of several months, Anisya's anxieties grow because she does not yet know where her husband hides his money. He may give it to his sister, Martha. While tea is prepared, Matryona assures the suffering Peter he will obtain a fine burial service. As Matryona helps him into the house, she feels the money on his person, so that Anisya succeeds in retrieving it and gives it to Nikita to bury. She then re-enters the house and comes out screaming. Matryona rolls up her sleeves to lay out the body. As Anisya wished, Nikita becomes the new master, but he quickly becomes enamored of Anisya's step-daughter, Akoulina, and squanders on her the money his wife killed for. He puts on airs with Akoulina and throws money at Akim, who finds such doings filthy, but nevertheless keeps the money. Akoulina quarrels with Anisya and accuses her of murdering Peter. To settle the quarrel, Nikita pushes Anisya out of the house, but after a while calls her back and gives her a present. Even more disgusted at such doings and considering he is heading for ruin, Akim gives back the money to his son. Several months later, Akolina is about to give birth as Matryona tries to arrange a marriage for her. Since she is unmarried, Anisya and Matryona plot to get rid of the baby, asking Nikita to dig a hole in the cellar, which he reluctantly does. Anisya retrieves the newborn wrapped in rags and throws it for Nikita to take care of, who is surprised to see it still alive. "Be quick and smother it, and then it won't be alive." she says. "It's your doing and you must finish it." Nikita comes out of the cellar trembling and upset: "How the little bones crunched under me!" he exclaims. He imagines he hears it whimpering still. In mortal conflict, he chases Anisya about with the spade. "How can it whimper?" asks his mother. "Why, you've flattened it into a pancake. The whole head is smashed to bits." During Akolina's wedding ceremony with another man, Nikita feels unable to give the blessing. Instead, he ties a rope around his neck. Matryona removes it. Anisya invites him back to the party. As they go, he picks up the rope again, but one of his laborers hangs on to it laughingly and drunkenly till he gives up. On entering the room with the guests, he falls drunkenly and declares: "Christian Commune, I have sinned and I wish to confess!" Very much alarmed at the beginning of this speech, Matryona says her son must be taken away. Despite her intervention, he confesses to Akim's joy to the murder of Peter and the baby, which Akoulina confirms to have borne. He says he did everything alone.

Alexander Ostrovsky described the conflicts between a mother, her son, and his wife, 1870s

"The storm"[edit]

"The storm". Time: 1850s. Place: Kalinov, Russia.

"The storm" text at http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/7991

Being an orphan, Boris' grandmother leaves a will whereby his uncle, Dukoy, a merchant, is to pay him and his sister a fair share of her fortune provided he shows a proper respect for his authority. But Dukoy takes advantage of the situation by pretending never to be satisfied and thereby keeping the money for himself. In the Kabanov household, Marfa is unhappy about the way her son, Tihon, handles his wife, Katerina. Tihon does not understand why he should foster fear in his wife. "Why should she fear you!" she exclaims. "What do you mean? Why, you must be crazy. If she doesn't fear you, she's not likely to fear me." Katerina confesses to Varvara, Tihon' sister, that she is in love with another man. Varvara promises to help her. "No, no, that must not be," she says. "What are you saying! God forbid!" She fears a storm is brewing. "Don't talk of not being afraid," she says. "Everyone must be afraid. What is dreadful is not it's killing you, but that death may overtake you all of a sudden, just as you are, with all your sins, with all your erring thoughts. I have no fear of death, but when I think that I shall be brought all at once before the face of God just as I am here, with you, after this talk,- that's what is awful! What I had in my heart! What wickedness! Fearful to think of!" Varvara guesses correctly that Katerina loves Boris. One day, Tihon prepares to leave on a two-week journey. "Lay your commands on your wife, exhort her how she is to live in your absence," his mother insists, "and then when you come back, you can ask if she has performed everything exactly." Varvara steals the garden-key from her mother, so that Katerina can meet her lover in the summerhouse and delivers as well a message to Boris that he must be near. While waiting for her, he confides to a friend, Kudriash, that he loves a married woman. Kudriash guesses who it is. Katerina comes to Boris, veiled. "Do you know that never by any prayer can I be free of this sin, never again'" she says. "Like a stone it will lie on my soul, like a stone." But yet she is determined to continue. "If they lock me up, that will be my death. And if they don't lock me up, I will find some way to see you again," she adds. As they retire together, Kudriash meets Varvara. They kiss and yawn. Tihon returns and Marfa notes how unhappy Katerina appears at this. A storm is on its way and Katerina is afraid. Tihon says that being afraid of storms is a question of temperament, to which Marfa comments: "The heart of another is darkness." Katerina shrieks as Boris suddenly appears for a visit. After he leaves, she reveals to her husband and his mother as thunder claps that from the first night and every night of his voyage, she went out with Boris. "Well, son! You see what freedom leads to," says Marfa triumphantly. "I told you so, but you wouldn't heed me. See what you've brought on yourself!" Tihon tells a friend it is not his fault, but his mother's. He still loves her, cannot hurt her, only giving her a few blows now and then at his mother's bidding. Meanwhile, Dukoy orders Boris away to Siberia. Varvara flees the house with Kudriash. Tihon then learns that Katerina has disappeared. By chance, Katerina finds Boris and asks to go with him, but he, being dependent on his uncle's will, says he cannot. Her condition is miserable, her husband's kindness being worse than his blows. They go their separate ways. A bystander notices a woman in the river. As a fearful Tihon heads in that direction, his mother holds him. When Katerina's corpse is carried in, Tihon blames his mother for her death, crying out to her ghost: "It is well with you, Katia, but why am I left to live and suffer!"