Haitian Creole/Articles

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Definite article[edit]

Singular nouns[edit]

Haitian Creole has a definite article, roughly corresponding to English "the" and French le/la. It is placed after the noun, and the sound varies by the last sound of the previous word. If the last sound is an oral consonant and is preceded by an oral vowel, it becomes la. Recall that in Haitian Creole, y is always a consonant.

Haitian Creole English
kravat la the tie
liv la the book
kay la the house

If the last sound is an oral consonant and is preceded by a nasal vowel, it becomes lan:

Haitian Creole English
lanp lan the lamp
bank lan the bank

If the last sound is an oral vowel and is preceded by an oral consonant, it becomes a:

Haitian Creole English
kouto a the knife
peyi a the country

If the last sound is an oral vowel and is preceded by a nasal consonant, it becomes an:

Haitian Creole English
fanmi an the family
mi an the wall

If the last sound is a nasal vowel, it becomes an:

Haitian Creole English
chien an the dog
pon an the bridge

If the last sound is a nasal consonant, it becomes nan:

Haitian Creole English
machin nan the car
telefòn nan the telephone
madanm nan the woman

Plural nouns[edit]

The definite article for any plural noun is yo. Recall that yo can also mean "they", "them" or "their".

Placement[edit]

The definite article goes after the noun, and also after anything that modifies the noun, including relative clauses.

Haitian Creole English
zanmi mwen an my friend
fè mwen konnen an the fact [that] I know
bagay ki nan bwat li a The thing that is in his/her/its box

Usage[edit]

The usage of the definite article is slightly different in Haitian Creole. It can be used to indicate singular vs. plural if the word sa is used with the same noun, or if there is a possessor indicated.

Haitian Creole English
moun sa yo these/those people
moun sa a this/that person

Indefinite article[edit]

Recall that the indefinite article is yon. It means "a" or "an". It goes before the noun it modifies.

Extra Practice
A worksheet covering this material is available at Wikiversity.