Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...e5/2. d4/2...exd4/3. c3/3...dxc3/4. Bc4/4...cxb2

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< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. e4‎ | 1...e5‎ | 2. d4‎ | 2...exd4‎ | 3. c3‎ | 3...dxc3‎ | 4. Bc4
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Danish Gambit Accepted
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation (FEN)

rnbqkbnr/pppp1ppp/8/8/2B1P3/8/Pp3PPP/RNBQK1NR

Danish Gambit Accepted[edit | edit source]

White is almost forced to recapture the pawn with his bishop. This regains a pawn, prevents black's pawn from promoting,and develops the dark squared bishop to a great square. The most likely line is: 5. Bxb2 d5 6. Bxd5 Nf6 7. Bxf7+ Kxf7 8. Qxd8 Bb4+ 9. Qd2 Bxd2+ 10. Nxd2 Re8 with even chances.

A risky trap in this line is to play 5. Qh5??, allowing Black's b-pawn to fork the rook and bishop with a promotion. However, if Black captures the more materially valuable rook with 5 . . . bxa1=Q??, White can end the game the next move with 6. Qxf7#. Black refutes the trap taking the bishop with 5 . . . bxc1=Q+.

Position after 10. ...Re8
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation (FEN)

rnb1r3/ppp2kpp/5n2/8/4P3/8/PB1N1PPP/R3K1NR