Chess Guide for the Intermediate Player/Example Games/Game1

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Hi there! This is the analysis of one of my game.

U$3rname008 vs Somewhat Weak Computer

I plays Black.

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Nc6 5. Bg5 Be7 6. a4 O-O 7. c5 b6 8. h4 bxc5 9. g3 Rb8 10. Bc1 cxd4 11. Nxd4 Nxd4 12. Qxd4 c5 13 Qd1 d4 14. f3 Bd6 15. Rh3 Qc7 16. f4 dxc3 17. bxc3 e5 18. Qc2 exf4 0-1

Opening[edit]

Here I played Indian Game, Anti-Nimzo-indian(E10). It's a variation of Queen's Pawn.

Almost equal. White has a very-small advantage.

It's like this.

Indian Game, Anti-Nimzo-indian(E10)
a b c d e f g h
8{{{square}}} black rook{{{square}}} black knight{{{square}}} black bishop{{{square}}} black queen{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black bishop{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black rook8
7{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn7
6{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black knight{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king6
5{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king5
4{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king4
3{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white knight{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king3
2{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn2
1{{{square}}} white rook{{{square}}} white knight{{{square}}} white bishop{{{square}}} white queen{{{square}}} white king{{{square}}} white bishop{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white rook1
a b c d e f g h

3. ... d5[edit]

a b c d e f g h
8{{{square}}} black rook{{{square}}} black knight{{{square}}} black bishop{{{square}}} black queen{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black bishop{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black rook8
7{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black pawn7
6{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black knight{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king6
5{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king5
4{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king4
3{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white knight{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king3
2{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn{{{square}}} white pawn2
1{{{square}}} white rook{{{square}}} white knight{{{square}}} white bishop{{{square}}} white queen{{{square}}} white king{{{square}}} white bishop{{{square}}} black king{{{square}}} white rook1
a b c d e f g h
After 3. ... d5.

Here I begin with this natural move. So it's White's turn. If you plays White, what do you wanna do?

Of course 4. Nc3, because it develops a piece, and also allows playing Nxd5, guards b5, controls d4.

Allows playing Nxd5[edit]

Nc3 attacks Black's d5 pawn, so Black must pay attention to his pawn structure. For example:

4. Nc3 c5 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bg5 and Black cannot play cxd4?, because of 7. Bxf6 Qxf6 Nxd5 captures the pawn.

Guards b5[edit]

Also, it guards b5, and b5 is a useful square to attack c4 for Black. For example:

4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 and Black cannot play 5. ... dxc4? because after 6. e4 b5 7. Nxb5 captures the b5 pawn. Then, c4 pawn becomes an isolated pawn, that's not good!

Controls e4[edit]

Nc3 also helps a bit about controling center - it supports e4, and White can push the e-pawn now. For example:

4. Nc3 dxc4 5. e4 and Black cannot play 5. ... Nxe4? because 6. Nxe4 captures the knight.

Sidenote: After 4. Nc3 White can respond to 4. ... Be7 with 5. Bg5.

Pay attention to[edit]

The White pawn at c4 can capture the Black pawn at d5[edit]

For example:

4. Nc3 c5 cxd5 exd5 Now the pawn that shields Black king is removed from that line, and White can easily attack the king.

The white bishop at c1 can move to g5 or g5-h4 to capture the black knight at f6[edit]

This can draw the Black queen away, because after capture the black knight, Black must recapture with his queen. However, the queen is protecting the d5 pawn, therefore, White can take the d5 pawn, in other words, the queen is "overloaded".

The white bishop at f1 supports the white pawn at c4[edit]

Which means, if Black captures the c4 pawn, then he has an isolated pawn, and White can free his bishop to capture it. For example:

4. Nc3 Nbd7 5. e3 dxc4 6. Bxc4

The unsupported white pawn at c4 is attacked by the black pawn[edit]

c4 pawn is floating and in danger, so if he plays a move like g3, didn't support c4 or create a counter attack, then Black can take it immediately.

4. g3 c5 5. Bg2 dxc4

The black knight at f6 supports the black pawn at d5[edit]

4. e3 c5 5. cxd5 Nxd5