CS Command Line Tools - Setup Manual (wiki version)/Printable version

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CS Command Line Tools - Setup Manual (wiki version)

The current, editable version of this book is available in Wikibooks, the open-content textbooks collection, at
https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/CS_Command_Line_Tools_-_Setup_Manual_(wiki_version)

Permission is granted to copy, distribute, and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.


Introduction

This manual explains how to install and setup CS Command Line Tools, so you can run any of these commands from any point in the command line. This manual is focused on DOS and Windows command line environments. Other OS environments may have equivalent or near equivalent commands but the command line tools for those will be different and the design philosophy of those tools may be different. Care should be taken to find out the differences between near equivalent command line tools if you are in a multi-OS environment.

First, you should download all the files you need from the sourceforge.net project named "CS Command Line Tools": http://sourceforge.net/projects/cs-cmdtools/. If you wish to install CS Command Line Tools you have to download the installer (cscltYYYY[MM]_ins.exe). Alternately you can download the companion compressed packages (cscltYYYY[MM]_pak.zip or cscltYYYY[MM]_pak.7z), which contains the same files as the installer. You should pay attention to the launch date of both the installer and the packages; you may need to download more tools or newer versions of some tools, as these packages only contain software made until that date.



Installing CS Command Line Tools

The installer is little more than a self-extracting archive, since it does not perform any kind of setup for you. You still have to refer to section 3 and make the required system modifications. In order to extract all tools contained in the installer, take the steps below:

  1. Execute the installer by left-clicking on its icon.
  2. Click the "Next" button after the welcome window appears.
  3. In the new window, check the checkbox left to "I accept the terms in the License Agreement". Then click the "Next" button again.
  4. Check the components you want to install (all components are checked by default) and click the "Next" button.
  5. The installer showing the component selection windowThe installer showing the component selection window
  6. Choose the directory where you want CS Command Line Tools to be installed (default is C:\WINDOWS\Command or C:\WINNT\Command). After checking, click the "Next" button once more.
  7. Choose the Start menu directory for CS Command Line Tools. Click the "Install" button to proceed to installation.
  8. Check the actions you wish to do after the installation process and click the "Finish" button to close the installer.

Note: If you check the option "Run CS Command Line Tools YYYY[-MM]", you will run "CmdLine.bat". You can call any of the installed commands from that console. However, they may not run from another console.



Setting up CS Command Line Tools

3.1 · Under Windows 95/98[edit | edit source]

If you extracted the executables to the directory "C:\WINDOWS\Command", then you are done with the setup. Otherwise take the following steps (we refer to the directory "C:\Command" as an example):

  1. Extend the Start menu and choose "Run...".
  2. Type "sysedit" in the edit box of the new window and click the "OK" button below.
  3. In the System Configuration Editor, select the child window titled "C:\AUTOEXEC.BAT" to see the contents of that file.
  4. Add the path ";C:\Command" to the entry starting with "SET Path", as shown in the image below (do not forget the semicolon). If that entry does not exist, type "SET Path=C:\Command" in a new paragraph .
  5. Save changes before you exit the editor and reboot the computer so the changes take effect.

3.2 · Under Windows NT/2000/XP[edit | edit source]

Assuming that you have administrator privileges, take the steps below:

  1. Extend the Start menu, choose "Settings" and then "Control Panel".
  2. In the new window, double-click the "System" icon.
  3. In the "System Properties" window, select the "Advanced" tab and then click the "Environment Variables" button.
  4. 4. In the "Environment Variables" window, highlight the "Path" system variable (located in the box at the bottom) and click the "Edit" button, as shown in the image below.
  5. Add ";C:\WINDOWS\Command" to the contents of the edit box located at the bottom of the new window (do not forget the semicolon) and click the "OK" button.

Note: If you extracted the executables to other directory, then you must add the path for that directory instead.

If you do not have administrator privileges, then you have to take the following steps:

  1. Take the necessary steps (indicated above) to open the "Environment Variables" window.
  2. Click the "New" button located at the middle of that window, as shown in the image below.
  3. 3. In the new window, type "Path" in the first edit box and type "C:\WINDOWS\Command" in the edit box below that one, as shown. Then, click the "OK" button.

Note: If you moved the executables to other directory, then you must type the path for that directory instead. Also, if the "Path" user variable exists, you only have to add the path to that directory (do not forget to use a semi-colon to separate the fields).



Under Windows 95/98

If you extracted the executables to the directory "C:\WINDOWS\Command", then you are done with the setup. Otherwise take the following steps (we refer to the directory "C:\Command" as an example):

  1. Extend the Start menu and choose "Run...".
  2. Type "sysedit" in the edit box of the new window and click the "OK" button below.
  3. In the System Configuration Editor, select the child window titled "C:\AUTOEXEC.BAT" to see the contents of that file.
  4. Add the path ";C:\Command" to the entry starting with "SET Path", as shown in the image below (do not forget the semicolon). If that entry does not exist, type "SET Path=C:\Command" in a new paragraph .
  5. Save changes before you exit the editor and reboot the computer so the changes take effect.



Under Windows NT/2000/XP

Assuming that you have administrator privileges, take the steps below:

  1. Extend the Start menu, choose "Settings" and then "Control Panel".
  2. In the new window, double-click the "System" icon.
  3. In the "System Properties" window, select the "Advanced" tab and then click the "Environment Variables" button.
  4. 4. In the "Environment Variables" window, highlight the "Path" system variable (located in the box at the bottom) and click the "Edit" button, as shown in the image below.
  5. Add ";C:\WINDOWS\Command" to the contents of the edit box located at the bottom of the new window (do not forget the semicolon) and click the "OK" button.

Note: If you extracted the executables to other directory, then you must add the path for that directory instead.

If you do not have administrator privileges, then you have to take the following steps:

  1. Take the necessary steps (indicated above) to open the "Environment Variables" window.
  2. Click the "New" button located at the middle of that window, as shown in the image below.
  3. 3. In the new window, type "Path" in the first edit box and type "C:\WINDOWS\Command" in the edit box below that one, as shown. Then, click the "OK" button.

Note: If you moved the executables to other directory, then you must type the path for that directory instead. Also, if the "Path" user variable exists, you only have to add the path to that directory (do not forget to use a semi-colon to separate the fields).



Testing the setup

You can verify if the setup was done correctly by taking these simple steps:

  1. Open the command prompt. You can open it by extending the Start menu and choosing "Programs", then "Accessories" and finally "Command Prompt".
  2. In the new window type the name of a command that you have downloaded, for example "typehex" (if you have it), and press ENTER.

You should see something similar to the output represented in the image below (actually, the output can vary depending on the command that you just typed and also on the version of that command). If you see a message like "'typehex' is not recognized as an internal or external command operable program or batch file.", then it is most likely that you did not set the "Path" environment variable correctly.