Arabic/Being Polite

From Wikibooks, open books for an open world
< Arabic
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Being polite is important. It is rather simple to be polite in Arabic. Just learn some of these and use them, at the right time. And remember a few golden rules.

  1. If you refuse a gift, an Arab will insist that you take it (This insisting and refusing can go on for up to a minute, between Arabs). So if an Arab offers you meat, and you are a vegetarian, either eat it or have a good excuse (medical excuses are often acceptable).

أهلا

ahlan
ah-lan
Hello
It means more than hello, but its usage is very similar to hello.

*السلام عليكم

al_salaamu `alaykum
as-sa-laa-mu-`a-lay-kum
Peace be upon you.
This is a very common greeting, although its usage is approved religiously. It is very common among Muslims; even muslims who understand no Arabic attempt to say it, whenever greeting someone. It's always better to say this greeting.




*مع السلامة

ma`a al_salaamah(-ti)
ma-`as-sa-laa-mah
with peace
Only said when leaving someone. If you said this when you just met someone, it would seem awkward.




الله يسلمك

allahu salmik(a/i)
aL-laa-hu-sal-mik
(May) God keep you in peace.
Often a reply to مع السلامة (ma`a alsalaamah).

أهلا وسهلا

ahlan wa sahlan
ah-lan-wa-sah-lan
Usage: Expressing great happiness at seeing someone.

وداعا

wa-daa-`an
bye




شكرا

shukran
shuk-ran
thanks

شكرا لك

shukran
shuk-ran-lak(a/i)
thank you

شكرا جزيلا

shukran jazeelan
shuk-ran-ja-zee-lan
thanks a lot
Note this is not the sarcastic usage in Arabic.

من فضلك

min faDlik(a/i)
min-faD-lik
please

أرجوك

arjook(a/i)
ar-jook
I'm begging you.

تفضل

tafaDDal
ta-faD-Dal
Please help yourself (when speaking to a man).

تفضلي

tafaDDalee
ta-faD-Da-lee
Please help yourself (when speaking to a woman).

تفضلوا

tafaDDaloo
ta-faD-Da-loo
Same as above but when talking to a group, as long as the group is not all female.

كيف حالك

kayfa Haaluk
kay-fa-Haa-luk
How are you doing? You must know this saying, every Arab asks every other Arab of the same gender and his son this question.

بـخيـر

bikhair
bi-khair
fine
Only used when answering "How are you doing?"

الـحمد لله

al_Hamdu lillaah
al-Ham-du-lil-Laah
Thank God.
Of course its meaning is not that simple.
Often used to answer "كيف حالك؟ ", and said when good news is heard (like a relative passed their final exam).
Literally it means: Praise be to God, that is, when answering the above questions with al-Ham-du-lil-Laah, you're praising God for the goodness received.

مرحبا

MarHabaan
"Hello", when talking to anyone