Speech-Language Pathology/Parkinson's

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A survey of Parkinson's patients found that[1]

  • 27% reported "difficulty getting started."
  • 9% reported "stuttering."
  • 9% reported "fast speech."
  • 9% reported "impaired stress of rhythm of speech."

The speech disorder associated with Parkinson's disease is also characterized by low volume and poor articulation. The combination sounds like mumbling. The standard treatment for Parkinson's speech is Lee Silverman Voice Therapy. LSVT focuses on increasing vocal volume, largely through consciously increasing airflow and vocal fold activity. A secondary benefit is improved articulation or vocal clarity.

Studies found varying results of DAF with Parkinson's patients.[2]

References

  1. ^ Blanchet, Paul. "Treating Fluency and Speech Rate Disorders in Individuals with Parkinson's Disease: The Use of Delayed Auditory Feedback (DAF)," Journal of Stuttering Therapy, Advocacy and Research, Volume 1, Number 2.
  2. ^ Blanchet, Paul. "Treating Fluency and Speech Rate Disorders in Individuals with Parkinson's Disease: The Use of Delayed Auditory Feedback (DAF)," Journal of Stuttering Therapy, Advocacy and Research, Volume 1, Number 2.