Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...e5/2. Nf3/2...Nc6/3. Bc4/3...Bc5/4. d3

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Giuoco Pianissimo
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

r1bqk1nr/pppp1ppp/2n5/2b1p3/2B1P3/3P1N2/PPP2PPP/RNBQK2R

Giuoco Pianissimo[edit]

With 4.d3, White plays the Giuoco Pianissimo (Italian: "very quiet game"). White aims for a slow buildup deferring d4 until it can be prepared. By avoiding an immediate confrontation in the center White prevents the early release of tension through exchanges and enters a positional maneuvering game. If White plays c2-c3, the position can take some characteristics of the Ruy Lopez if his bishop retreats to c2 via Bc4-b3-c2. (The alternative move order 4.c3 Nf6 5.d3 is common in master play.) Despite its drawish reputation, this variation became more popular after being taken up by Anatoly Karpov in the 1978 World Championship[citation needed].

Theory table[edit]

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.d3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1 ...
d6
O-O
Nf6
Nc3
h6
h3
O-O
a3
a6
b4
Ba7




-/+1
2 ...
...
c3
Nf6
Bb3
O-O
h3
Be6
Nbd2
a6
Qe2
Ba7
g4
Nd7
Bc2
d5
-/+
3 ...
Nf6
Bg5
h6
Bh4
d6
Nbd2
a6
a4
g5
Bg3
Nh5
c3
Qf6
Qe2
Nf4
=
4 ...
...
Bb3
d6
c3
a6
O-O
Ba7
Nbd2
O-O
h3
Be6
Bc2
h6
Re1
Ne7
-/+
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
-/+

Notes[edit]

1: Good chances for Black

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References[edit]

  • Batsford Chess Openings 2 (1989, 1994). Garry Kasparov, Raymond Keene. ISBN 0-8050-3409-9.