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  • After finding Dante astray, Virgil guides him back to his proper path in life. Dante and Virgil must first pass through Hell, where they cross its nine
    868 bytes (159 words) - 18:37, 28 October 2010
  • succour the wretched. The narrator (Bloom?) has adapted a line (1:630) from Virgil's epic poem the Aeneid: Non ignara mali, miseris succurrere disco (Not unacquainted
    430 bytes (66 words) - 14:34, 23 January 2012
  • leads from Hell, Dante and Virgil encounter a group of people who have recently arrived in Purgatory. As Dante and Virgil climb the mountain of Purgatory
    650 bytes (116 words) - 01:55, 29 April 2009
  • gestures.[2] Publius Vergilius Maro (70 BC-19 BC), known in English as Virgil, was a Roman poet. His works included the Eclogues, the Georgics and the
    6 KB (1,024 words) - 13:08, 9 September 2009
  • Malabranche. Barbaricca is the leader of a troop of demons who escort Dante and Virgil through the fifth of the Malebolge that comprise the Eighth Circle of Hell
    1 KB (246 words) - 14:37, 14 July 2012
  • Upon meeting Beatrice and leaving Virgil, Dante travels through Heaven, which takes the form of the solar system. Canto I Canto II Canto III Canto IV
    453 bytes (84 words) - 01:55, 29 April 2009
  • cabin fire inside the Command Service Module killed three crew members (Virgil "Gus" Grissom, Edward H. White, and Roger B. Chaffee). After the accident
    12 KB (1,477 words) - 02:26, 7 December 2014
  • knowledge of agricultural practices seems to have been gleaned largely from Virgil and other noblest Romans. Carr often had a hard time persuading his distant
    10 KB (1,718 words) - 16:32, 17 December 2007
  • fecit     (Latin) a god has made these comforts for us. The line is a quotation from Virgil's collection of pastoral poems, Eclogues 1:6. Gifford (1988) 153. Thornton
    220 bytes (36 words) - 16:24, 11 December 2011
  • Rastapopoulos (The Adventures of Tintin) Sebastian Shaw (X-Men: First Class) Virgil Sollozzo (The Godfather) Winston Wolf (Pulp Fiction) Zeus Harvey Specter
    5 KB (734 words) - 16:51, 28 October 2015
  • Laocoön and His Sons or The Laocoön, which depicts the scene described by Virgil in Book 2 of the Aeneid, in which the Trojan priest and his sons are crushed
    14 KB (993 words) - 09:41, 18 May 2015
  • that of Cuban-American writer Virgil Suarez. Both are children of the 60’s and foreign-born Latinos. Both Junot and Virgil received MFA’s and are professors
    6 KB (1,041 words) - 10:56, 15 June 2014
  • Achates     (Latin) faithful Achates. Achates is the friend and companion of Aeneas in Virgil's epic poem the Aeneid. He is referred to by this phrase on three occasions
    553 bytes (88 words) - 15:11, 9 December 2011
  • Fuit Ilium!     (Latin) Troy has been! The quotation is from Virgil's epic poem the Aeneid 2:325: Ilium is a Latinized form of Ilion (Ἴλιον), another name
    436 bytes (68 words) - 15:47, 11 December 2011
  • should begin with a capital: as, "Remember this maxim: 'Know yourself.'" "Virgil says, 'Labour conquers all things.'" "Jesus answered them, Is it not written
    30 KB (4,620 words) - 20:16, 1 November 2014
  • historical and contemporary individuals. The most important of these figures is Virgil, the Latin poet, who plays the role of Dante's guide through the afterlife
    26 KB (3,932 words) - 17:29, 24 September 2015
  • describes the ideal epic poet: The Homeric epics the Iliad and the Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid all begin in medias res. Gifford (1988) 561. Thornton (1968)
    301 bytes (51 words) - 15:03, 29 January 2012
  • They had reproduced the writings and works of Aristotle, Plutarch, Plato, Virgil, and other notables. The Arabs formulated algebra and explored science and
    1 KB (247 words) - 18:02, 31 January 2013
  • Carmina in detail, along with many other Latin texts. Other examples include Virgil's Aeneid, Horace's Odes and passages from Livy. Outside of school he has
    2 KB (270 words) - 06:59, 28 April 2009
  • the limbs Agitates the whole mass, and mixes itself with GREAT MATTER" (Virgil: "Aeneid," vi., 724 ff.) ur Socrates (c.470 – 399 BC) (Greek Σωκράτης Sōkrátēs)
    11 KB (1,778 words) - 09:03, 4 February 2016

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